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Canon digital cameras with internal rechargable battery and highshutter speed??

 
 
Neil Jones
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      12-02-2007
Hello,

I have a Canon Powershot G-5 camera which I purchased in 2003. It is a
great camera and it is still working. Last winter, I started
experiencing problems with zooming (might be something to do with the
cold weather) but in summer the problem has disappeared. Anyway, now I
am ready to upgrade my camera to a different Canon model. There are too
many choices with varying options. The 2 most important choices for me are:
1. High shutter speed (>2800)
2. Rechargeable internal battery

Does Canon have these choices available in a point and shoot type camera?

Thank you in advance for any information.

NJ

---------------------
Random URL found on the Internet
http://memoriter.net/flash/test.html
 
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Joseph Meehan
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      12-02-2007
By internal, do you mean, not owner accessible? I don't know of any
camera that has only external batteries. Some have that as an option for
extended capacity.

I would prefer batteries I can change. I like the ability to carry a
spare and to be able to easily replace a battery when it starts to wear out.

"Neil Jones" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed). ..
> Hello,
>
> I have a Canon Powershot G-5 camera which I purchased in 2003. It is a
> great camera and it is still working. Last winter, I started experiencing
> problems with zooming (might be something to do with the cold weather) but
> in summer the problem has disappeared. Anyway, now I am ready to upgrade
> my camera to a different Canon model. There are too many choices with
> varying options. The 2 most important choices for me are:
> 1. High shutter speed (>2800)
> 2. Rechargeable internal battery
>
> Does Canon have these choices available in a point and shoot type camera?
>
> Thank you in advance for any information.
>
> NJ
>
> ---------------------
> Random URL found on the Internet
> http://memoriter.net/flash/test.html



--
Joseph Meehan

Dia 's Muire duit



 
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Mark B.
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      12-02-2007

"Neil Jones" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed). ..
> Hello,
>
> I have a Canon Powershot G-5 camera which I purchased in 2003. It is a
> great camera and it is still working. Last winter, I started experiencing
> problems with zooming (might be something to do with the cold weather) but
> in summer the problem has disappeared. Anyway, now I am ready to upgrade
> my camera to a different Canon model. There are too many choices with
> varying options. The 2 most important choices for me are:
> 1. High shutter speed (>2800)


You can go here: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/compare.asp to do a search
by camera type and shutter speed, along with just about any other feature
that is important to you.

> 2. Rechargeable internal battery
>


Not sure what you mean here. All digital cameras use rechargeable
batteries, either AA or proprietery Li-ion. I'm not aware of any that use a
non-removeable battery and personally I would steer clear of any such
camera. For AA you can use non-rechargeables in a pinch. Energizer
Lithiums seem to be popular for emergency use. The new hybrid type
rechargeable NiMH (such as Sanyo Eneloop) offer the best of both worlds -
they hold the charge much longer than normal NiMH which typically deplete by
a few % each day even when sitting unused.

Mark


 
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irwell
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      12-02-2007
On Sun, 2 Dec 2007 10:23:48 -0500, "Mark B."
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>


>>

>
>Not sure what you mean here. All digital cameras use rechargeable
>batteries, either AA or proprietery Li-ion. I'm not aware of any that use a
>non-removeable battery and personally I would steer clear of any such
>camera.


Oregon Scientific had such a camera, the internal battery
is charged via a USB cable from the computer.
 
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irwell
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      12-02-2007
On Sun, 02 Dec 2007 09:08:35 -0800, irwell <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Sun, 2 Dec 2007 10:23:48 -0500, "Mark B."
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>

>
>>>

>>
>>Not sure what you mean here. All digital cameras use rechargeable
>>batteries, either AA or proprietery Li-ion. I'm not aware of any that use a
>>non-removeable battery and personally I would steer clear of any such
>>camera.

>
>Oregon Scientific had such a camera, the internal battery
>is charged via a USB cable from the computer.


CHARGING THE BATTERIES
Long battery life is one of the key benefits of this camera compared
to other digital
cameras. On a full charge, the camera will take hundreds of images.
Your camera
battery has already been charged prior to shipment. So, you should be
able to take
pictures without recharging it. However, just to be safe, you may want
to follow the
instructions below to make sure that your camera is fully charged
before leaving
home.
The lithium-polymer battery used in the camera recharges automatically
when the
camera is plugged into a PC via the USB cable. To charge the battery
for the first
time:
1. Install the included
software (see Installing
the Software in section 4).
2. Plug the camera into your
computer using the
provided USB cable.
3. When the battery is
charging, the green LED
will blink. When charging
is complete, the green
LED will be solid.
LITHIUM-POLYMER BATTERY TIPS
SAFETY NOTE
Always observe the precautions described in Section 8.
It takes approximately 3 hours to fully charge a depleted battery.
The camera can be charged at ambient temperatures between 0C and
+40C.
The battery does not need to be fully discharged or exhausted before
being
recharged.
Lithium-polymer batteries lose their charge even when not used. So,
be sure to
charge the battery before taking pictures.
To ensure that your battery lasts as long as possible, switch the
camera off when
you are not using it.
The number of available shots will be lower at low temperatures. You
can
increase the amount of power produced by putting the camera in your
pocket or
another warm place to heat it just before taking pictures. If you are
using a
heating pad, take care not to place the camera directly against the
pad.
 
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NeilD
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-02-2007
On Sun, 02 Dec 2007 07:57:31 -0500, Neil Jones
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Hello,
>
>I have a Canon Powershot G-5 camera which I purchased in 2003. It is a
>great camera and it is still working. Last winter, I started
>experiencing problems with zooming (might be something to do with the
>cold weather) but in summer the problem has disappeared. Anyway, now I
>am ready to upgrade my camera to a different Canon model. There are too
>many choices with varying options. The 2 most important choices for me are:
> 1. High shutter speed (>2800)
> 2. Rechargeable internal battery
>
>Does Canon have these choices available in a point and shoot type camera?
>
>Thank you in advance for any information.
>
>NJ
>


You might be interested in any of the inexpensive Canon Powershot
P&S cameras that can run CHDK. Shutter speeds up to 1/10,000th of
a second with high-speed flash sync included for all shutter
speeds up to the highest.

http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/CHDK

I don't think you'll find too many cameras these days that allow
for in-camera recharging. There was too much risk of battery
failure and explosion during charging process as well as generous
heat given off by any that use NiHM battery types during
charging. Not that I've heard of this destroying many, or any,
cameras but it can happen under the right circumstances. It's a
risk that's not worth testing. I have a Li-Ion camera that
charges internally and it's still fine even 6 years later, but I
do like having that little extra safety factor of charging
batteries externally. This is what makes AA's so nice. Chargers
and batteries available anywhere.


 
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Mark B.
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      12-02-2007

"irwell" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Sun, 2 Dec 2007 10:23:48 -0500, "Mark B."
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>

>
>>>

>>
>>Not sure what you mean here. All digital cameras use rechargeable
>>batteries, either AA or proprietery Li-ion. I'm not aware of any that use
>>a
>>non-removeable battery and personally I would steer clear of any such
>>camera.

>
> Oregon Scientific had such a camera, the internal battery
> is charged via a USB cable from the computer.


So you have to wait for the battery to charge again before you can use the
camera again. I wouldn't like that at all.

Mark



 
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shawn chambers
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-02-2007
On Sun, 2 Dec 2007 16:09:00 -0500, "Mark B." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
>"irwell" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news:(E-Mail Removed).. .
>> On Sun, 2 Dec 2007 10:23:48 -0500, "Mark B."
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>>

>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>Not sure what you mean here. All digital cameras use rechargeable
>>>batteries, either AA or proprietery Li-ion. I'm not aware of any that use
>>>a
>>>non-removeable battery and personally I would steer clear of any such
>>>camera.

>>
>> Oregon Scientific had such a camera, the internal battery
>> is charged via a USB cable from the computer.

>
>So you have to wait for the battery to charge again before you can use the
>camera again. I wouldn't like that at all.
>
>Mark
>
>


True, it's an inconvenience if you don't plan ahead properly and don't limit
yourself to what comes in the camera box. Always keep a spare one charged in
your pocket. Charge the dead one during any free-time and access to mains or
other power source. During an extensive trip into a remote area I've even used
an external emergency battery-pack a few times to charge the internal battery,
worked just as good. As long as the external power supply has slightly higher
voltage it'll flow into the one in the camera. Also, considering that most
in-camera charge models have exceptional battery life you can easily go a couple
days of intensive shooting before having to swap out batteries. As long as
you're not one of those silly machine-gun snap-shooters who think that if they
only shoot enough images one will finally turn out right. Or buy any of the many
stand-alone chargers that have interchangeable adapter plates to take any design
of Li-Ion batteries, or a dedicated charger just for that battery line or model.

There's many workarounds. None of which are a make or break selling point.

 
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Mark B.
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-02-2007

"shawn chambers" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Sun, 2 Dec 2007 16:09:00 -0500, "Mark B." <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
> True, it's an inconvenience if you don't plan ahead properly and don't
> limit
> yourself to what comes in the camera box. Always keep a spare one charged
> in
> your pocket.


A spare camera? I had a look at Oregon Scientific cameras with a Google
search, and I wouldn't want one if it was free let alone have a spare.

> Charge the dead one during any free-time and access to mains or
> other power source. During an extensive trip into a remote area I've even
> used
> an external emergency battery-pack a few times to charge the internal
> battery,
> worked just as good. As long as the external power supply has slightly
> higher
> voltage it'll flow into the one in the camera. Also, considering that most
> in-camera charge models have exceptional battery life you can easily go a
> couple
> days of intensive shooting before having to swap out batteries. As long as
> you're not one of those silly machine-gun snap-shooters who think that if
> they
> only shoot enough images one will finally turn out right. Or buy any of
> the many
> stand-alone chargers that have interchangeable adapter plates to take any
> design
> of Li-Ion batteries, or a dedicated charger just for that battery line or
> model.
>


I got the sense from reading the descriptions that the batteries on OS cams
are strictly built-in and not interchangeable. Not a very consumer friendly
solution. Who doesn't want to have at least one spare battery charged and
ready to go? That would be just as bad as built-in memory with no memory
card slot.

> There's many workarounds. None of which are a make or break selling point.
>


I'd rather just swap batteries, so to me it's a no-go selling point.


 
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shawn chambers
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-03-2007
On Sun, 2 Dec 2007 18:36:56 -0500, "Mark B." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
>"shawn chambers" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news:(E-Mail Removed).. .
>> On Sun, 2 Dec 2007 16:09:00 -0500, "Mark B." <(E-Mail Removed)>
>> wrote:
>>
>> True, it's an inconvenience if you don't plan ahead properly and don't
>> limit
>> yourself to what comes in the camera box. Always keep a spare one charged
>> in
>> your pocket.

>
>A spare camera? I had a look at Oregon Scientific cameras with a Google
>search, and I wouldn't want one if it was free let alone have a spare.
>
>> Charge the dead one during any free-time and access to mains or
>> other power source. During an extensive trip into a remote area I've even
>> used
>> an external emergency battery-pack a few times to charge the internal
>> battery,
>> worked just as good. As long as the external power supply has slightly
>> higher
>> voltage it'll flow into the one in the camera. Also, considering that most
>> in-camera charge models have exceptional battery life you can easily go a
>> couple
>> days of intensive shooting before having to swap out batteries. As long as
>> you're not one of those silly machine-gun snap-shooters who think that if
>> they
>> only shoot enough images one will finally turn out right. Or buy any of
>> the many
>> stand-alone chargers that have interchangeable adapter plates to take any
>> design
>> of Li-Ion batteries, or a dedicated charger just for that battery line or
>> model.
>>

>
>I got the sense from reading the descriptions that the batteries on OS cams
>are strictly built-in and not interchangeable. Not a very consumer friendly
>solution. Who doesn't want to have at least one spare battery charged and
>ready to go? That would be just as bad as built-in memory with no memory
>card slot.
>
>> There's many workarounds. None of which are a make or break selling point.
>>

>
>I'd rather just swap batteries, so to me it's a no-go selling point.
>


I personally was referring to those models that do charge in-camera but also
have a removable battery. Some exceptionally nice cameras too, top shelf. I
still use mine often because no newer cameras come close to it for some of its
features and quality. My first one cost (with accessories to get into digital
fully-dressed) well over $1200 at the time. I have never investigated the OS
brand of cameras nor do I want to take the time to, but I wasn't aware of any
where you could NOT swap out batteries before. Unless maybe it was some kid's
camera or earlier web-cam/digicam/snapshot-cam bubble-pack purchase.
 
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