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Python web frameworks

 
 
joe jacob
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      11-20-2007
There are a lot of web frameworks for python like django, mod_python,
spyce, turbo gears, Zope, Cherrypy etc. Which one is the best in terms
of performance and ease of study.
 
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Jeff
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      11-20-2007
The only one that I have used extensively is Django, which is very
easy to use and quite powerful in the arena for which it was created.
It has a powerful admin interface that automatically generates data
entry forms for content producers and a decent template system. It
has some definite drawbacks, though. The admin interface is difficult
to customize because it was not meant to be customized too much
(Django was written in a newspaper environment, where data needs to go
online quickly and be easily customizable for the next story or next
year's use). It also lacks ajax support.

I understand that Zope has a pretty high learning curve and is
currently in various stages of rewrite.

I don't know much about the others. Turbo gears uses Mochikit, which
hasn't had a new stable release in some time. I prefer jQuery myself.
 
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Joe Riopel
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      11-20-2007
On Nov 20, 2007 7:19 AM, joe jacob <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> There are a lot of web frameworks for python like django, mod_python,
> spyce, turbo gears, Zope, Cherrypy etc. Which one is the best in terms
> of performance and ease of study.


I wouldn't classify mod_python as a web framework: "Mod_python is an
Apache module that embeds the Python interpreter within the server.".

I haven't used all of the frameworks that you have mentioned, but I
really like what I have seen from Pylons so far.
 
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BartlebyScrivener
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      11-20-2007
On Nov 20, 6:19 am, joe jacob <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> There are a lot of web frameworks for python like django, mod_python,
> spyce, turbo gears, Zope, Cherrypy etc. Which one is the best in terms
> of performance and ease of study.


I'm looking at django mainly. I hope the veterans jump in with the
latest on these. The django book (written by the developers) comes out
12/7. Django comes with its own little server so that you don't have
to set up Apache on your desktop to play with it. Configuration is
tricky at first, but what fun to code a web app in Python instead of
looking up php commands all day.

Drafts of the django book are available at the site. I would follow
the examples in the book instead of the tutorial. The tutorial works,
but I seemed to learn more using the examples in the book.

As for performance, see the page on caching. I barely understand the
server dynamics but you can find pages and sites comparing dango
performance to ruby on rails.

http://www.djangoproject.com/documentation/cache/

rd
 
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Joe Riopel
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      11-20-2007
On Nov 20, 2007 8:46 AM, BartlebyScrivener <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Django comes with its own little server so that you don't have
> to set up Apache on your desktop to play with it.


Pylons too, it's good for development but using the bundled web server
is not recommended for production.
 
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Bernard
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      11-20-2007
On 20 nov, 07:19, joe jacob <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> There are a lot of web frameworks for python like django, mod_python,
> spyce, turbo gears, Zope, Cherrypy etc. Which one is the best in terms
> of performance and ease of study.


I'm making web apps with CherryPy at work and it's quite good.
the official docs are a bit messy though but they left useful comments
in their code.
 
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Diez B. Roggisch
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      11-20-2007
> 12/7. Django comes with its own little server so that you don't have
> to set up Apache on your desktop to play with it.


I was rather shocked to learn that django only has this tiny server and does
not come with a stand-alone server and is supposed to run as
mod_python/cgi-driven app through apache.

Which reaps you of all the benefits of standalone servers like connection
pooling & caching data and so forth. Including sessions - I presume they
always go into the db/filesystem as PHP does.

Diez
 
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Thomas Wittek
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      11-20-2007
Jeff:
> I don't know much about the others. Turbo gears uses Mochikit, which
> hasn't had a new stable release in some time. I prefer jQuery myself.


You can use jQuery with TurboGears if you develop custom widgets (I do so).
No problem here.

--
Thomas Wittek
Web: http://gedankenkonstrukt.de/
Jabber: http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)-pobox.net
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Paul Boddie
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      11-20-2007
On 20 Nov, 15:42, "Diez B. Roggisch" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > 12/7. Django comes with its own little server so that you don't have
> > to set up Apache on your desktop to play with it.

>
> I was rather shocked to learn that django only has this tiny server and does
> not come with a stand-alone server and is supposed to run as
> mod_python/cgi-driven app through apache.


The standalone server aspect of a large number of Python Web
frameworks typically involves BaseHTTPServer from the standard
library, as far as I've seen, excluding things like Twisted which
aspire to offer production quality server solutions themselves. This
was common back in the old days of Webware, in contrast to Zope which
used Medusa at the time, if I remember correctly.

> Which reaps you of all the benefits of standalone servers like connection
> pooling & caching data and so forth. Including sessions - I presume they
> always go into the db/filesystem as PHP does.


I guess it's a compromise between deployment complexity and benefits
in the above areas, although mod_python should offer some relief in
some of the above areas. What people didn't like about Webware so much
was that run in the recommended way - with a standalone server which
communicated with Web server processes - people had to have separate
long-running processes, which various hosting providers didn't like.

What's most important is that you should be able to switch out one
server technology with another when you reach the limits of the
original, all without having to rewrite your application or do some
major re-plumbing. It does surprise me that mod_python is recommended
for use with Django in the various quick start guides I've read, but I
suppose that lets the developer avoid the issue of migrating up from a
simple server to something more scalable. Not that this should be a
problem, of course.

Paul
 
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Bruno Desthuilliers
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      11-20-2007
joe jacob a écrit :
> There are a lot of web frameworks for python like django, mod_python,
> spyce, turbo gears, Zope, Cherrypy etc. Which one is the best in terms
> of performance and ease of study.


As far as I'm concerned, the winners are Django and Pylons (my own
preference going to Pylons).
 
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