Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > DVD Video > How to strip out sound from a dvd? What Cyberlink product?

Reply
Thread Tools

How to strip out sound from a dvd? What Cyberlink product?

 
 
raylopez99
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-25-2007
I have some DVDs that are commercial products (possibly copy
protected, but I bought them) that I want to just strip out the sound
from (so I can listen just to the sound, hopefully converting them
to .MP3 files).

What, if any, software can do this? Cyberlink?

RL

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Kenneth J. Harris
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-25-2007
raylopez99 wrote:

> I have some DVDs that are commercial products (possibly copy
> protected, but I bought them) that I want to just strip out the sound
> from (so I can listen just to the sound, hopefully converting them
> to .MP3 files).
>
> What, if any, software can do this? Cyberlink?
>
> RL



I know that Roxio EMC 9 will do this, using the Video Wave module, which
has an Extract Audio function. Gives you .WAV file.

Ken
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Ken Maltby
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-25-2007

"raylopez99" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ps.com...
>I have some DVDs that are commercial products (possibly copy
> protected, but I bought them) that I want to just strip out the sound
> from (so I can listen just to the sound, hopefully converting them
> to .MP3 files).
>
> What, if any, software can do this? Cyberlink?
>
> RL
>


Most of the decrypting tools will let you demux and
select streams. DVD Decrypter, DVDShrink being
the old stand by programs, and will still work for some
DVDs. They are free, but you may need a newer
program for the current DVDs.

www.videohelp.com has listings of available tools.

Luck;
Ken


 
Reply With Quote
 
raylopez99
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-26-2007
On Oct 25, 12:34 pm, "Ken Maltby" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> www.videohelp.com has listings of available tools.
>



Did a quick search and found this 'free' solution below for audio,
which I'll try. IN the meantime, I was using a free version of
Cyberlink PowerDVD that's expired; if anybody has a better or free DVD
player, please let me know (or I'll just have to shell out the $80 or
so and buy it, not a big deal--but is Roxio better? or about the
same?)

Update: I found Windows Media 10 plays DVDs and seems to be working
right now--I'll try it with Audacity as described below and if I have
any problems I'll post again--tx.

RL

http://www.jakeludington.com/ask_jak...dio_to_cd.html

How do you record the audio portion of a DVD to a standard CD?

There are several ways to tackle the process of converting the audio
output from a DVD movie to something you can burn to CD and listen to
in your car or elsewhere. Depending on whether the DVD you want to
extract the audio from is a commercial release or something you own
the rights to you need to tread carefully in choosing your options. In
terms of complexity, the legal method of acquiring the audio from a
commercial DVD may be less complicated anyway.

The most straightforward method for separating the audio from a DVD is
simply to record it cassette deck style with an audio editing
application. Using this method, you'll open the DVD in a software
player like PowerDVD, CinePlayer or WinDVD. To record the DVD audio
track use your favorite audio editing application or download Audacity
for free. Configure Audacity's preferences to record 44,100 Hz, 16-bit
Stereo. Choose Stereo Mix from the list of recording options or "What
you hear" if you use a Creative Labs sound card. Press the Record
button and start the movie. When the movie is done, stop the recording
and close your DVD player application.

At this point, it's a good idea to save a copy of the DVD audio, in
case your computer crashes or the power goes out. You'll probably need
to break the DVD audio into more than one file in order to put it on
CDs. A CD holds a maximum of 72 minutes of Audio. Most Movies are a
least 90 minutes in length. You can either divide the audio into
individual tracks and save each track, or you can save the audio as
two big files to be burned to two CDs.

If you followed the directions here, the recorded audio likely has
several seconds of silence at the beginning of the file. Before
exporting your audio, eliminate the silence by selecting it from the
audio timeline and tapping the delete key.

To split the file into multiple tracks, use one of two methods. Either
select the section of the main audio file you want to split into a
track and actually split the track by choosing Edit > Split from the
menu which creates two separate tracks.



Using this method you then save the individual Audacity tracks as
separate files.


Alternatively, you can use the label feature to mark your track
divisions and export each labeled section as an individual track.
First, divide the audio file using separate labels for each track by
specifying a segment of the audio and choosing Project > Add Label At
Selection (Ctrl+B).



Once you've got all the track divisions label, export the labels as
individual files.



Using your CD burning software, create a playlist with a track order
to burn the files in the order you created them.

The second method for doing this requires you to first rip the DVD
using a software application like SmartRipper. If the DVD is a
commercial release with Macrovision protection and CSS, this is a
violation of the DMCA and therefore illegal in the United States as of
this writing. It's perfectly acceptable to use this method for
extracting audio from any DVD you own the rights to or created
yourself. Once you have the DVD ripped, an application called DVD2AVI
can split out the audio as one big file. For a more visual guide to
this process, take a look at the steps used in putting DVD video on a
Pocket PC. The process is the same. At this point you're back to the
same problem of needing to make the file small enough to fit on a CD.
The same directions for using Audacity described above are necessary
to split the track into a manageable file size.

 
Reply With Quote
 
Ken Maltby
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-26-2007

"raylopez99" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
> On Oct 25, 12:34 pm, "Ken Maltby" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>> www.videohelp.com has listings of available tools.
>>

>
>
> Did a quick search and found this 'free' solution below for audio,
> which I'll try. IN the meantime, I was using a free version of
> Cyberlink PowerDVD that's expired; if anybody has a better or free DVD
> player, please let me know (or I'll just have to shell out the $80 or
> so and buy it, not a big deal--but is Roxio better? or about the
> same?)
>
> Update: I found Windows Media 10 plays DVDs and seems to be working
> right now--I'll try it with Audacity as described below and if I have
> any problems I'll post again--tx.
>
> RL
>


I like the free "Media Player Classic" myself. As long as you
have that copy of PowerDVD installed the codec you need to
play DVDs is available to your system.

While that process you describe includes some useful advice
on using Audacity, a real time capture isn't needed. If you
use the demux function of a "DVD Ripper" it will only take a
few minuets to extract the audio. Then you will have decrypted
audio that you can use in Audacity, BeSweet or any other audio
program.

Luck;
Ken


Luck;
Ken


 
Reply With Quote
 
raylopez99
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-26-2007
On Oct 26, 7:29 am, "Ken Maltby" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> While that process you describe includes some useful advice
> on using Audacity, a real time capture isn't needed. If you
> use the demux function of a "DVD Ripper" it will only take a
> few minuets to extract the audio. Then you will have decrypted
> audio that you can use in Audacity, BeSweet or any other audio
> program.



Your hardware must be incredibly powerful, or maybe capturing video is
just slow for me. I am running a five year old Pentium IV chip (it's
basically a souped up Celeron chip), with 2 GB RAM and a big HD, but
when I clicked (using Audacity) on a DVD .VOB file (to extract the
audio), I got a long wait (I aborted after 10 minutes) for a 1 GB
size .VOB file (and there were five such files comprising the DVD).
Finally, I decided to do a real time capture, so I played the DVD
(using Windows Media Player 10), capturing using "stereo" and default
settings in Audacity, went away for two hours, and when I came back
the file captured was 2.3 GB of audio (saved as .AU files--Audacity
format), which, using a module in Audacity, I am converting (as I type
this) to .MP3. If there's a quicker way let me know. Perhaps I
should have not aborted the .VOB file capture--maybe it's faster than
a realtime capture--would a 1 GB file take 30 minutes to load, and
then, what, another 30 minutes to save to .MP3? So perhaps it's twice
as fast to do a non-realtime capture (since it seems saving to .MP3
will take 30 minutes right now, so 2 hours realtime capture + 30
minutes to save to .MP3 = 150 minutes total).

RL

 
Reply With Quote
 
raylopez99
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-26-2007
On Oct 26, 10:24 am, raylopez99 <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On Oct 26, 7:29 am, "Ken Maltby" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> > While that process you describe includes some useful advice
> > on using Audacity, a real time capture isn't needed. If you
> > use the demux function of a "DVD Ripper" it will only take a
> > few minuets to extract the audio. Then you will have decrypted
> > audio that you can use in Audacity, BeSweet or any other audio
> > program.

>
> Your hardware must be incredibly powerful, or maybe capturing video is
> just slow for me. I am running a five year old Pentium IV chip (it's
> basically a souped up Celeron chip), with 2 GB RAM and a big HD, but
> when I clicked (using Audacity) on a DVD .VOB file (to extract the
> audio), I got a long wait (I aborted after 10 minutes) for a 1 GB
> size .VOB file (and there were five such files comprising the DVD).
> Finally, I decided to do a real time capture, so I played the DVD
> (using Windows Media Player 10), capturing using "stereo" and default
> settings in Audacity, went away for two hours, and when I came back
> the file captured was 2.3 GB of audio (saved as .AU files--Audacity
> format), which, using a module in Audacity, I am converting (as I type
> this) to .MP3. If there's a quicker way let me know. Perhaps I
> should have not aborted the .VOB file capture--maybe it's faster than
> a realtime capture--would a 1 GB file take 30 minutes to load, and
> then, what, another 30 minutes to save to .MP3? So perhaps it's twice
> as fast to do a non-realtime capture (since it seems saving to .MP3
> will take 30 minutes right now, so 2 hours realtime capture + 30
> minutes to save to .MP3 = 150 minutes total).
>


I just tried importing a smaller .VOB file using Audacity,and, after
it loads it, converting it to .MP3, it gives, at the very end, a real-
time runtime error (and asks if you want to Send a report to Audacity,
etc). So it looks like with my system at least, I cannot do a non-
realtime transfer/conversion of DVD audio anyway (at least with my
copy of Audacity), so I'm stuck to doing the capture in realtime
(which is longer but not a big deal for me).

RL

 
Reply With Quote
 
Ken Maltby
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-26-2007

"raylopez99" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ups.com...
> On Oct 26, 10:24 am, raylopez99 <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> On Oct 26, 7:29 am, "Ken Maltby" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>> > While that process you describe includes some useful advice
>> > on using Audacity, a real time capture isn't needed. If you
>> > use the demux function of a "DVD Ripper" it will only take a
>> > few minuets to extract the audio. Then you will have decrypted
>> > audio that you can use in Audacity, BeSweet or any other audio
>> > program.

>>
>> Your hardware must be incredibly powerful, or maybe capturing video is
>> just slow for me. I am running a five year old Pentium IV chip (it's
>> basically a souped up Celeron chip), with 2 GB RAM and a big HD, but
>> when I clicked (using Audacity) on a DVD .VOB file (to extract the
>> audio), I got a long wait (I aborted after 10 minutes) for a 1 GB
>> size .VOB file (and there were five such files comprising the DVD).
>> Finally, I decided to do a real time capture, so I played the DVD
>> (using Windows Media Player 10), capturing using "stereo" and default
>> settings in Audacity, went away for two hours, and when I came back
>> the file captured was 2.3 GB of audio (saved as .AU files--Audacity
>> format), which, using a module in Audacity, I am converting (as I type
>> this) to .MP3. If there's a quicker way let me know. Perhaps I
>> should have not aborted the .VOB file capture--maybe it's faster than
>> a realtime capture--would a 1 GB file take 30 minutes to load, and
>> then, what, another 30 minutes to save to .MP3? So perhaps it's twice
>> as fast to do a non-realtime capture (since it seems saving to .MP3
>> will take 30 minutes right now, so 2 hours realtime capture + 30
>> minutes to save to .MP3 = 150 minutes total).
>>

>
> I just tried importing a smaller .VOB file using Audacity,and, after
> it loads it, converting it to .MP3, it gives, at the very end, a real-
> time runtime error (and asks if you want to Send a report to Audacity,
> etc). So it looks like with my system at least, I cannot do a non-
> realtime transfer/conversion of DVD audio anyway (at least with my
> copy of Audacity), so I'm stuck to doing the capture in realtime
> (which is longer but not a big deal for me).
>
> RL
>


You have to decrypt the DVD first, then you can use Audacity
on the demuxed audio file. As I said you should have the
decrypting/ripping software output as demuxed audio and video.
It is that decrypted audio file that you edit with Audacity or other
audio software.

Even the old DVD Decrypter that comes with the Gordian Knot
download will do it in a couple of minutes. Any converter can
use the Lame MP3 encoding codec to turn your demuxed audio
into a .mp3 file in a few more minutes.

If you have www.VideoReDo.com you can use that on
the decrypted .vob, edit it and extract it to ES and even convert
the audio to .wav.

Luck;
Ken


 
Reply With Quote
 
raylopez99
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-27-2007
On Oct 26, 2:14 pm, "Ken Maltby" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> > etc). So it looks like with my system at least, I cannot do a non-
> > realtime transfer/conversion of DVD audio anyway (at least with my
> > copy of Audacity), so I'm stuck to doing the capture in realtime
> > (which is longer but not a big deal for me).

>
> > RL

>
> You have to decrypt the DVD first, then you can use Audacity
> on the demuxed audio file. As I said you should have the
> decrypting/ripping software output as demuxed audio and video.
> It is that decrypted audio file that you edit with Audacity or other
> audio software.
>
> Even the old DVD Decrypter that comes with the Gordian Knot
> download will do it in a couple of minutes. Any converter can
> use the Lame MP3 encoding codec to turn your demuxed audio
> into a .mp3 file in a few more minutes.
>
> If you have www.VideoReDo.com you can use that on
> the decrypted .vob, edit it and extract it to ES and even convert
> the audio to .wav.
>
>


Thanks for the advice. Your advice is good for a heavy duty DVD user,
but not for me--I'm just trying to trip 3 DVDs of their audio (speech,
not music). Here's how I wasted 2 hours this morning:

I checked out three programs, actually more, since some were flagged
as "trojans" by my anti-virus program (the banned in the USA program
DVD Decrypt 3.3.4.0 for example--probably a false positive but I was
too afraid to install it), and none of them, because they were
shareware or otherwise, worked. For example Easiestutils DVD Audio
Ripper 4.9.0.63 failed on my generic Penitum 4, relatively modern XP
OS system. Another one called DVD to MP3 I found on Download.com
failed. If I rebooted (I didn't bother since on my system rebooting
takes 5 to 10 minutes), which sometimes helps with the registry file,
disabled all my spyware/virus background programs, asked users on
various forums after registering, kept trying with other programs,
eventually (after about a half a day IMO) I would probably get at
least one such decrypting/ripping program to run, but for now I'll do
my business using the 'old-fashioned' way of simply real-time capture
using Audacity, which seems to work with not too much noise (real-time
capture does introduce a bit of background hiss, but since I'm
capturing the words rather than music, I don't really care).

RL

 
Reply With Quote
 
John Williamson
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-27-2007
raylopez99 wrote:
<Stuff about problems extracting sound from DVDs>

If you're not stuck with having to use Cyberlink programs, there is a
freeware bundle called DVD2SVCD, which works with TMPGEnc (An Mpeg
encoder, freeware for MPEG1 or shareware for MPEG2)or any other command
liine capable mpeg encoder program, to strip a DVD down to VideoCD.
While it's doing this, it generates temporary files of the sound & video
streams which can be converted into any format you wish.

You get on your Hard drive the .IFO files, the .VOB files, .ac3
extracted audio, .mp2 encoded audio, .mpv MPEG1 video stream and a
combined .mpg (Mpeg1 format, 352x288 resolution) As a bonus, you get a
number of .bin/.cue Video CD Image files you can burn to CD-R for playback.

You do need to use DVDs you have the right to copy, though, as it is
illegal in most places to break copyright protection systems such as CSS
& the like

--
Tciao for Now!

John.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Re: How include a large array? Edward A. Falk C Programming 1 04-04-2013 08:07 PM
strip all but second second line from bottom and then strip that!!!! yelipolok Perl Misc 4 01-27-2010 08:14 AM
problems with sound display in DVDs using Cyberlink PowerDVD version7 Ernst Tremel DVD Video 0 07-15-2006 09:48 PM
Cyberlink power DVD 5 William Dickinson Computer Support 1 04-13-2005 11:49 AM
strip and its evil brother strip! Aquila Ruby 35 03-31-2005 04:10 AM



Advertisments