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Editing pictures over a network

 
 
Tony Luxton
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-30-2007
Hello Group. I downloaded some pictures from my camera to my "Shared
Documents" folder (which is shared on the network). I then tried to rotate
some of them (from landscape to portrait) using the other machine, but it
wouldn't let me - the commands "rotate clockwise/anti-clockwise" in the
right-click menu were greyed out. I had to do it on the machine where the
files were situated.

Is this normal behaviour? I've "allowed network users to change my files"
for the shared documents folder.

TIA Tony.


Computer built 2004
Windows XP Home OEM, SP2
512 MB RAM
120 GB HD
Avast! AV up to date
Spybot S&D up to date
Ad-Aware up to date
Windows firewall only (plus hardware firewall on router)
Part of workgroup with one other machine


 
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Lem
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-30-2007
Tony Luxton wrote:
> Hello Group. I downloaded some pictures from my camera to my "Shared
> Documents" folder (which is shared on the network). I then tried to rotate
> some of them (from landscape to portrait) using the other machine, but it
> wouldn't let me - the commands "rotate clockwise/anti-clockwise" in the
> right-click menu were greyed out. I had to do it on the machine where the
> files were situated.
>
> Is this normal behaviour? I've "allowed network users to change my files"
> for the shared documents folder.
>
> TIA Tony.
>
>
> Computer built 2004
> Windows XP Home OEM, SP2
> 512 MB RAM
> 120 GB HD
> Avast! AV up to date
> Spybot S&D up to date
> Ad-Aware up to date
> Windows firewall only (plus hardware firewall on router)
> Part of workgroup with one other machine
>
>


It may depend on how the software you're using to rotate the pictures
works. I had a similar problem using Canon's ZoomBrowser software. You
can read the explanation below, but the most straightforward thing is to
check the permissions of the files that you can't rotate.

Because you have XP Home, you'll have to do this in safe mode, and as a
user with administrative privileges. Right-click on a file, select
Properties, and then the Security tab. If you compare the permissions
for a file that does not have the problem with one that does, you should
see the difference (probably "Everyone" does not have modify rights to
the problem files). In the "Advanced" screen, make sure that the box to
"Inherit from parent the permission entries that apply to child objects"
is checked (this is the default).

Now, right-click the folder in which the picture files are stored and go
to the Security tab. Click the "Advanced" button. This time, there
should be a second box to "Replace permission entries on all child
objects with entries shown here that apply to child objects." Check this
and OK out (note that this operation can't be undone). See generally,
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308418/ and
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308419/



Apparently, the way Canon's "ZoomBrowser" image filing/handling software
works is that when the EXIF information from the image file on the
camera indicates that the picture has been taken in the vertical format,
the software initially stores the file in C:\Windows\Temp (or other
temporary directory) in the usual landscape (horizontal) format, then
rotates it, and stores the rotated version in the intended target
directory.

The problem is that the Temp directory -- where the file is initially
created -- is not shared (who would think to share the Temp directory
!?). And, according to KB310316, "By default, an object inherits
permissions from its parent object, either at the time of creation or
when it is copied or moved to its parent folder. The only exception to
this rule occurs when you move an object to a different folder on the
same volume. In this case, the original permissions are retained."

Thus, even though the file appears to be in a folder that has the
"shared" permission set, it has inherited the original "do not share"
permission from the Temp directory in which it was created.

--
Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
 
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Tony Luxton
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-30-2007

"Lem" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Tony Luxton wrote:
>> Hello Group. I downloaded some pictures from my camera to my "Shared
>> Documents" folder (which is shared on the network). I then tried to
>> rotate some of them (from landscape to portrait) using the other machine,
>> but it wouldn't let me - the commands "rotate clockwise/anti-clockwise"
>> in the right-click menu were greyed out. I had to do it on the machine
>> where the files were situated.
>>
>> Is this normal behaviour? I've "allowed network users to change my files"
>> for the shared documents folder.
>>
>> TIA Tony.
>>
>>
>> Computer built 2004
>> Windows XP Home OEM, SP2
>> 512 MB RAM
>> 120 GB HD
>> Avast! AV up to date
>> Spybot S&D up to date
>> Ad-Aware up to date
>> Windows firewall only (plus hardware firewall on router)
>> Part of workgroup with one other machine

>
> It may depend on how the software you're using to rotate the pictures
> works. I had a similar problem using Canon's ZoomBrowser software. You
> can read the explanation below, but the most straightforward thing is to
> check the permissions of the files that you can't rotate.
>
> Because you have XP Home, you'll have to do this in safe mode, and as a
> user with administrative privileges. Right-click on a file, select
> Properties, and then the Security tab. If you compare the permissions for
> a file that does not have the problem with one that does, you should see
> the difference (probably "Everyone" does not have modify rights to the
> problem files). In the "Advanced" screen, make sure that the box to
> "Inherit from parent the permission entries that apply to child objects"
> is checked (this is the default).
>
> Now, right-click the folder in which the picture files are stored and go
> to the Security tab. Click the "Advanced" button. This time, there
> should be a second box to "Replace permission entries on all child objects
> with entries shown here that apply to child objects." Check this and OK
> out (note that this operation can't be undone). See generally,
> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308418/ and
> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308419/
>
>
>
> Apparently, the way Canon's "ZoomBrowser" image filing/handling software
> works is that when the EXIF information from the image file on the
> camera indicates that the picture has been taken in the vertical format,
> the software initially stores the file in C:\Windows\Temp (or other
> temporary directory) in the usual landscape (horizontal) format, then
> rotates it, and stores the rotated version in the intended target
> directory.
>
> The problem is that the Temp directory -- where the file is initially
> created -- is not shared (who would think to share the Temp directory
> !?). And, according to KB310316, "By default, an object inherits
> permissions from its parent object, either at the time of creation or
> when it is copied or moved to its parent folder. The only exception to
> this rule occurs when you move an object to a different folder on the
> same volume. In this case, the original permissions are retained."
>
> Thus, even though the file appears to be in a folder that has the
> "shared" permission set, it has inherited the original "do not share"
> permission from the Temp directory in which it was created.
>
> --
> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
>
> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer


Lem, thanks for your reply.

I think you're on to something - now that I think about it, the files were
originally copied to my own "My Documents" folder (which isn't shared),
*then* moved to the "Shared Documents" folder. (Two things happen when you
get older - one is you lose your memory. I forget what the other one is.)

You were right about the permissions - I've done that now.

Many thanks!

regards Tony.


 
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Lem
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-30-2007
Tony Luxton wrote:
> "Lem" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Tony Luxton wrote:
>>> Hello Group. I downloaded some pictures from my camera to my "Shared
>>> Documents" folder (which is shared on the network). I then tried to
>>> rotate some of them (from landscape to portrait) using the other machine,
>>> but it wouldn't let me - the commands "rotate clockwise/anti-clockwise"
>>> in the right-click menu were greyed out. I had to do it on the machine
>>> where the files were situated.
>>>
>>> Is this normal behaviour? I've "allowed network users to change my files"
>>> for the shared documents folder.
>>>
>>> TIA Tony.
>>>
>>>
>>> Computer built 2004
>>> Windows XP Home OEM, SP2
>>> 512 MB RAM
>>> 120 GB HD
>>> Avast! AV up to date
>>> Spybot S&D up to date
>>> Ad-Aware up to date
>>> Windows firewall only (plus hardware firewall on router)
>>> Part of workgroup with one other machine

>> It may depend on how the software you're using to rotate the pictures
>> works. I had a similar problem using Canon's ZoomBrowser software. You
>> can read the explanation below, but the most straightforward thing is to
>> check the permissions of the files that you can't rotate.
>>
>> Because you have XP Home, you'll have to do this in safe mode, and as a
>> user with administrative privileges. Right-click on a file, select
>> Properties, and then the Security tab. If you compare the permissions for
>> a file that does not have the problem with one that does, you should see
>> the difference (probably "Everyone" does not have modify rights to the
>> problem files). In the "Advanced" screen, make sure that the box to
>> "Inherit from parent the permission entries that apply to child objects"
>> is checked (this is the default).
>>
>> Now, right-click the folder in which the picture files are stored and go
>> to the Security tab. Click the "Advanced" button. This time, there
>> should be a second box to "Replace permission entries on all child objects
>> with entries shown here that apply to child objects." Check this and OK
>> out (note that this operation can't be undone). See generally,
>> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308418/ and
>> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308419/
>>
>>
>>
>> Apparently, the way Canon's "ZoomBrowser" image filing/handling software
>> works is that when the EXIF information from the image file on the
>> camera indicates that the picture has been taken in the vertical format,
>> the software initially stores the file in C:\Windows\Temp (or other
>> temporary directory) in the usual landscape (horizontal) format, then
>> rotates it, and stores the rotated version in the intended target
>> directory.
>>
>> The problem is that the Temp directory -- where the file is initially
>> created -- is not shared (who would think to share the Temp directory
>> !?). And, according to KB310316, "By default, an object inherits
>> permissions from its parent object, either at the time of creation or
>> when it is copied or moved to its parent folder. The only exception to
>> this rule occurs when you move an object to a different folder on the
>> same volume. In this case, the original permissions are retained."
>>
>> Thus, even though the file appears to be in a folder that has the
>> "shared" permission set, it has inherited the original "do not share"
>> permission from the Temp directory in which it was created.
>>
>> --
>> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
>>
>> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

>
> Lem, thanks for your reply.
>
> I think you're on to something - now that I think about it, the files were
> originally copied to my own "My Documents" folder (which isn't shared),
> *then* moved to the "Shared Documents" folder. (Two things happen when you
> get older - one is you lose your memory. I forget what the other one is.)
>
> You were right about the permissions - I've done that now.
>
> Many thanks!
>
> regards Tony.
>
>


I'm glad that worked. I encountered that when copying all of "my
pictures" over my LAN to sync with another computer, and certain files
refused to copy. It took a while to figure out what was going on.

--
Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
 
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