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Bright light in sky?

 
 
pete
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      09-22-2007
On 22 Sep 2007 02:18:04 GMT, Blinky the Shark <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
>> Blinky the Shark wrote:
>>
>>> who'sthat wrote:
>>>> No, you can't see the ISS with the naked eye unless you know exactly
>>>> where to look and then it would only be a small dot.
>>>
>>> And it would be moving a lot faster than the stars and planets even
>>> if you could see it.

>>
>> Yes, you can see it with the naked eye. Sure, it has to be a very clear
>> night.
>>
>> http://www.esa.int/esaHS/ESA0I6KE43D_iss_0.html
>> "Spotting the ISS with the naked eye is not as difficult as it might
>> seem - providing you know in which direction to look. Although the ISS
>> travels at a speed of 7.7 km per second it is in one of the lowest
>> orbits possible - an approximate 390 km above our heads - and thanks to
>> its large solar wings it is one of the brightest ?stars? making it
>> fairly easy to distinguish as it visibly moves across the night sky."

>
>Echo 1 was the first one I ever saw up there with only me eyes:
>
>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Echo_satellite


This is so bright I at first thought it was a 'plane approaching
London but it is stationary. I tell you how bright as I was surrounded
by sodium lights and I could still see it clearer than anything else
in the sky.
pete
http://www.brazierbridgewood.blogspot.com/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ipswich
 
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pete
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      09-22-2007
On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 03:28:23 GMT, Ponder <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>Hiya who'sthat.
>
>In <news:(E-Mail Removed) > you wrote:
>
>> The sites I sent will also point out planets.
>> No, you can't see the ISS with the naked eye unless you know exactly
>> where to look and then it would only be a small dot.

>
> It also moves quite fast.


Hi Colin, this is stationary so it is probably a heavenly body of some
sort
pete
 
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pete
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      09-22-2007
On 22 Sep 2007 03:34:28 GMT, Blinky the Shark <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>pete wrote:
>> On 22 Sep 2007 00:19:51 GMT, Blinky the Shark <(E-Mail Removed)>
>> wrote:
>>
>>>who'sthat wrote:
>>>> On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 00:59:35 +0100, pete <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>On Fri, 21 Sep 2007 15:10:16 -0500, who'sthat
>>>>><who'sthat@don'tknow.com> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>On Fri, 21 Sep 2007 21:04:03 +0100, pete <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>I live near the east coast and just lately I have noticed a very
>>>>>>>bright light in the sky. It is roughly in the East and appears to be
>>>>>>>too bright to be a star. Does anyone know what it is?
>>>>>>>pete
>>>>>>>http://www.brazierbridgewood.blogspot.com/
>>>>>>>http://www.flickr.com/photos/ipswich
>>>>>>
>>>>>>http://www.space.com/spacewatch/easy_east_021002.html
>>>>>>
>>>>>>And now you won't need Google
>>>>>>http://www.space.com/images/all_sky_map_0209_02.jpg
>>>>>
>>>>>Thanks but I don't think it is a star etc. I was wondering if the
>>>>>space lab could be around that area?
>>>>>pete
>>>>>http://www.brazierbridgewood.blogspot.com/
>>>>>http://www.flickr.com/photos/ipswich
>>>>
>>>> The sites I sent will also point out planets.
>>>> No, you can't see the ISS with the naked eye unless you know exactly
>>>> where to look and then it would only be a small dot.
>>>
>>>And it would be moving a lot faster than the stars and planets even if
>>>you could see it.

>>
>> Well that has knocked that theory on the head then as this appears
>> stationary.
>> pete
>> http://www.brazierbridgewood.blogspot.com/
>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/ipswich

>
>Say, those links look familiar. :-/


Ipswich.
pete

>That said, hasn't anyone ever heard of the "morning star"/"evening star"
>-- Venus? Sheesh. It didn't just happen.

http://www.brazierbridgewood.blogspot.com/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ipswich
 
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pcbutts1
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      09-22-2007
It's the ISS, I have seen it for the past 4 days on the west coast at 4am
looking east.


--

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The list grows. Leythos the stalker http://www.leythosthestalker.com, David
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"pete" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On 22 Sep 2007 00:19:51 GMT, Blinky the Shark <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
>>who'sthat wrote:
>>> On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 00:59:35 +0100, pete <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>
>>>>On Fri, 21 Sep 2007 15:10:16 -0500, who'sthat
>>>><who'sthat@don'tknow.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>On Fri, 21 Sep 2007 21:04:03 +0100, pete <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>I live near the east coast and just lately I have noticed a very
>>>>>>bright light in the sky. It is roughly in the East and appears to be
>>>>>>too bright to be a star. Does anyone know what it is?
>>>>>>pete
>>>>>>http://www.brazierbridgewood.blogspot.com/
>>>>>>http://www.flickr.com/photos/ipswich
>>>>>
>>>>>http://www.space.com/spacewatch/easy_east_021002.html
>>>>>
>>>>>And now you won't need Google
>>>>>http://www.space.com/images/all_sky_map_0209_02.jpg
>>>>
>>>>Thanks but I don't think it is a star etc. I was wondering if the
>>>>space lab could be around that area?
>>>>pete
>>>>http://www.brazierbridgewood.blogspot.com/
>>>>http://www.flickr.com/photos/ipswich
>>>
>>> The sites I sent will also point out planets.
>>> No, you can't see the ISS with the naked eye unless you know exactly
>>> where to look and then it would only be a small dot.

>>
>>And it would be moving a lot faster than the stars and planets even if
>>you could see it.

>
> Well that has knocked that theory on the head then as this appears
> stationary.
> pete
> http://www.brazierbridgewood.blogspot.com/
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/ipswich



 
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who'sthat
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      09-22-2007
On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 04:38:17 +0100, pete <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 03:28:23 GMT, Ponder <(E-Mail Removed)>
>wrote:
>
>>Hiya who'sthat.
>>
>>In <news:(E-Mail Removed) > you wrote:
>>
>>> The sites I sent will also point out planets.
>>> No, you can't see the ISS with the naked eye unless you know exactly
>>> where to look and then it would only be a small dot.

>>
>> It also moves quite fast.

>
>Hi Colin, this is stationary so it is probably a heavenly body of some
>sort
>pete

The only thing in the northern hemisphere that is stationary is the
North Star or a satalite in geosynchronous orbit.
 
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Croft
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      09-22-2007
"pete" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Fri, 21 Sep 2007 15:10:16 -0500, who'sthat
> <who'sthat@don'tknow.com> wrote:
>>On Fri, 21 Sep 2007 21:04:03 +0100, pete <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>I live near the east coast and just lately I have noticed a very
>>>bright light in the sky. It is roughly in the East and appears to be
>>>too bright to be a star. Does anyone know what it is?
>>>pete

> Thanks but I don't think it is a star etc. I was wondering if the
> space lab could be around that area?
> pete
> http://www.brazierbridgewood.blogspot.com/
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/ipswich


Could it be Mars? It is at its brightest for 60,000 years this month. see
http://thescotsman.scotsman.com/index.cfm?id=823752003
--
Dave Croft
Warrington
http://www.oldengine.org/members/croft/
http://community.webshots.com/user/crftdv


 
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RobV
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      09-22-2007
pete wrote:
> On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 01:46:08 GMT, "Beauregard T. Shagnasty"
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Blinky the Shark wrote:
>>
>>> who'sthat wrote:
>>>> No, you can't see the ISS with the naked eye unless you know
>>>> exactly where to look and then it would only be a small dot.
>>>
>>> And it would be moving a lot faster than the stars and planets even
>>> if you could see it.

>>
>> Yes, you can see it with the naked eye. Sure, it has to be a very
>> clear night.
>>
>> http://www.esa.int/esaHS/ESA0I6KE43D_iss_0.html
>> "Spotting the ISS with the naked eye is not as difficult as it might
>> seem - providing you know in which direction to look. Although the
>> ISS travels at a speed of 7.7 km per second it is in one of the
>> lowest orbits possible - an approximate 390 km above our heads - and
>> thanks to its large solar wings it is one of the brightest 'stars'
>> making it fairly easy to distinguish as it visibly moves across the
>> night sky."

>
> Everything fits but what I am looking at each night lately is
> stationary.
> pete


[snip]

It's Venus. It will reach maximum brightness tomorrow.

http://spaceweather.com:80/

About halfway down the page.


 
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pumkinbutt
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      09-22-2007
On Sep 21, 1:04 pm, pete <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> I live near the east coast and just lately I have noticed a very
> bright light in the sky. It is roughly in the East and appears to be
> too bright to be a star. Does anyone know what it is?
> petehttp://www.brazierbridgewood.blogspot.com/http://www.flickr.com/photos/ipswich


near cocoa beach?

 
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pete
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      09-22-2007
On Fri, 21 Sep 2007 23:40:50 -0700, "pcbutts1"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>It's the ISS, I have seen it for the past 4 days on the west coast at 4am
>looking east.


Well yes I thought that could be the answer. I am on the east coast
and I see it at about the same time roughly ESE. I believe last year I
saw it too but more towards the South.
pete
http://www.brazierbridgewood.blogspot.com/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ipswich
 
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pete
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-22-2007
On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 04:12:55 -0500, who'sthat
<who'sthat@don'tknow.com> wrote:

>On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 04:38:17 +0100, pete <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 03:28:23 GMT, Ponder <(E-Mail Removed)>
>>wrote:
>>
>>>Hiya who'sthat.
>>>
>>>In <news:(E-Mail Removed) > you wrote:
>>>
>>>> The sites I sent will also point out planets.
>>>> No, you can't see the ISS with the naked eye unless you know exactly
>>>> where to look and then it would only be a small dot.
>>>
>>> It also moves quite fast.

>>
>>Hi Colin, this is stationary so it is probably a heavenly body of some
>>sort
>>pete

>The only thing in the northern hemisphere that is stationary is the
>North Star or a satalite in geosynchronous orbit.


I watch it for the 30min or so my dog is exercising and it doesn't
move in that time.
pete
http://www.brazierbridgewood.blogspot.com/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ipswich
 
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