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Camera in rain and is hosed - what do I do?

 
 
Wayne Wrangler
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      09-10-2007
On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 06:13:38 -0700, Annika1980 <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Sep 9, 11:41 pm, Melvin Schiefer <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> The Lumix line are a perfectly fine and admirable line of cameras.

>
>They are crap cameras that take crap pictures.


Well, if you judge a camera's capability by the quality of photographs taken by
the photographer, applying the same logic I would have to say the Canon 20D is
the biggest crap camera I have ever seen. If I judge it by using the photos that
you have taken through it.

 
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Scott Schuckert
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      09-10-2007

Observations:

- Keep it OUT of the oven, or for that matter any other heat source.
- All doors open in a warm dry place will be fine.
- STOP trying to start it up. Leave it OFF for at least a week.
- This is not an FTb or a Pentax.
- Uh, start pricing new cameras...

Finally, you guys should be ashamed of yourselves for sniping at each
other over the corpse of this poor guys camera. If you disagree with
someone's advice, tell us why and offer an alternative. Sheesh!
 
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ray
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      09-10-2007
On Sun, 09 Sep 2007 20:45:54 -0400, TommyC wrote:

> Since near consensus is forming that I hosed my camera, I am looking for
> a suggestion on a possible replacement.
>
> Again, what I had was an FZ20 from the Panasonic Lumix line. What I
> liked about it, and have come to rely on, were:
>
> - 12x zoom - I shoot a lot of sports
> - hot shoe for an external flash
> - threaded lens barrel, for lens hood and/or filters
>
> It used an SD card, which I know is pretty common. The proprietary
> rechargeable battery was always good for 500+ shots (many done in burst
> mode). I think most of what else it had is common in cameras.
>
> What are some good cameras to consider as replacements? I'm thinking of
> around a $300 price point.


As you know, there are quite a few cameras in that range. After handling
several, I greatly appreciate EVF cameras with 220k pixel EVF or so -
rather than the 110k which is prevalent - may not bother you, but it would
drive me crazy. Suggest you check both ways and compare. One maker who
uses the higher res EVFs almost exclusively is Kodak. I chose a Kodak P850
last fall - 12 zoom, hot shoe, can get a lens adapter for filters; also
does raw, tiff, jpeg in case you think you'd like to get into raw. Suggest
you check out a P or Z unit at a local dealer. If you're interested, there
are good deals at the Kodak online store. A refurb P850 + printer dock
cost me $250 last fall.

 
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Allen
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      09-10-2007
Wayne Wrangler wrote:
> On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 06:13:38 -0700, Annika1980 <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> On Sep 9, 11:41 pm, Melvin Schiefer <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> The Lumix line are a perfectly fine and admirable line of cameras.

>> They are crap cameras that take crap pictures.

>
> Well, if you judge a camera's capability by the quality of photographs taken by
> the photographer, applying the same logic I would have to say the Canon 20D is
> the biggest crap camera I have ever seen. If I judge it by using the photos that
> you have taken through it.
>

I am eagerly awaiting your post of some of your pictures so that we can
compare them with Annika's. Of course, with the time it takes you to
come up with a new name for each post, plus the start of classes in
junior high probably leaves you no time to post any pictures.
Allen
 
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TommyC
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      09-10-2007
In article <46e4c9bc$0$4066$(E-Mail Removed)>,
"Yoshi" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> "TommyC" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> >I was dumb enough to be taking pictures in the rain today.
> >
> > Part way through, the electronic viewfinder got what looked like a TV
> > test pattern, and then none of the buttons worked - only the on/off
> > switch.
> >
> > I put the camera in a dry spot and took the battery out, and a couple
> > hours later it seemed to work. I even took a picture with it.
> >
> > But then an hour after that, as I was putting it away, I tried it again.
> > It turns on, and the EVF works tracking what the camera is aimed at.
> > But the shutter release doesn't work, the menu doesn't work, and none of
> > the buttons on the camera work. The only thing that works is the mode
> > dial on the camera.
> >
> > Right now I have the battery recharging (odd, it was fully charged
> > before, I took only a few pictures, and the battery seems to be taking a
> > long charge). I am hoping that leaving the camera airing out will
> > improve things.
> >
> > But if it doens't what do I do for the camera?
> >
> > It's a Pansonic Lumix FZ20.

>
>
> Dont put it in an oven... that's idiotic advice. Put the camera, sans
> batteries and card, into a closed airtight container with a dessicant like
> silica gel for several days.
>
>


I heard this a lot asking some local photographers I know about my
problem. So I got a ton of silica pouches - free - from my local camera
store, and have them and the camera cohabitating right now, and
hopefully heading toward complete dryness.
 
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Richard Carlson
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      09-13-2007
On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 11:20:31 -0400, Scott Schuckert wrote:

Give it some time to dry out and remove the batteries. The problem with
IC surface mounted components is that they are not impervious to
moisture. The package integrity can be compromised, also shorts between
adjacent pins can occur if moisture is present. If that doesn't top it
all off, some metallic migration of the lead and tin from the solder can
actually create short circuits with voltage applied. Your biggest problem
will be with shorts more than likely if moisture is present and voltage
applied. Take out the batteries and let it dry out for a couple days.

Rich
 
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TommyC
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      09-13-2007
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
Richard Carlson <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 11:20:31 -0400, Scott Schuckert wrote:
>
> Give it some time to dry out and remove the batteries. The problem with
> IC surface mounted components is that they are not impervious to
> moisture. The package integrity can be compromised, also shorts between
> adjacent pins can occur if moisture is present. If that doesn't top it
> all off, some metallic migration of the lead and tin from the solder can
> actually create short circuits with voltage applied. Your biggest problem
> will be with shorts more than likely if moisture is present and voltage
> applied. Take out the batteries and let it dry out for a couple days.
>
> Rich


I picked up several handfuls of desiccant packs - free - from a camera
store and packed the camera, batteries out, in a sealed container.
Three days later, I pulled the camera out (boy, did it ever feel dry),
put the battery and card in - and no progress at all.

It turns on, the EVF works, the LCD will display pictures from the card
if I'm in preview mode, but really, only the on/off switch, the mode
dial, and the EVF work. None of the function or menu buttons, or even
the zoom control work.

I heated the desiccant bags up to dry them out completely and have
repacked the camera in them once they came down to room temperature.
But I am convinced that the camera is shot. I'll give it a couple more
days of drying, then accept what happens.

I am going to post a separate thread asking for more camera suggestions
- the part in this thread where I asked originally didn't get any
responses.
 
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Roger (K8RI)
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      09-14-2007
On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 00:12:08 GMT, Do This <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Sun, 09 Sep 2007 19:34:47 -0400, TommyC <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
>> Do This <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>


>120 to 150 degrees F. is not a warm place, that's an oven. You may have done
>more damage to your camera in trying to dry it out than you did by getting it
>wet. I would never subject any digital camera to temps higher than 110-115
>degrees for more than a 10 or 15 minute span. Even when it's warm and sunny
>outside I walk with the camera in the shadow of my body to prevent the sun from
>overheating it. The (stupidly) black-pro bodies of all newer cameras can get
>dangerously warm just sitting in the sun.


I think most or them are a bit more rugged than that, or at least the
ones I've used so far have been. Mine are, or were, "working cameras".
They didn't used to have the luxury of being treated nice all the
time. They still ride in the car most of the time and it's not
uncommon for the interior of a car to reach 140 in the hot summer sun
even up here in the frozen north. I've even found my little D70
uncomfortably hot to hold onto. With my old F4S cameras it was a
common occurrence and I've even forgotten to bring in the old Oly E20N
and found it on the front seat in direct sunlight. That was too hot to
handle. I used the strap to lower it below the dash. It still works
fine.

I've seen cameras and communications radios get so hot the LCD
displays went all black. After cooling they worked fine.

Having said all that, I agree that given a choice (or time) I'd not
subject my cameras to that. OTOH even the black body Pro cameras don't
need to be carried in the shade all the time.

>
>Test the camera for functionality ONLY AFTER A FEW DAYS TO A WEEK of drying
>time. At the first suspicion that water may have invaded your circuitry you take
>out all batteries and get it dried off and into a warm dry place as soon as
>possible. Trying to get it to still work in that condition can only do more
>damage. A full accidental dunking in fresh or salt-water is another scenario
>that requires further quick action, but I won't go into that here.
>
>As for the clock-battery location I can't help you there. Look inside of the
>battery compartment for a small slide-out tray or under a small screw-down cover
>or other small latched area. Most all cameras make them accessible because they
>have to eventually be replaced, though it may be years before needing to do so.
>Inspect the camera carefully, you're bound to find where they put it.
>
>Your impatience and drastic drying methods may have destroyed your camera. Do as


That is probably true.

>I said and leave it alone for a few days to a week before attempting it again.
>And TAKE IT OUT OF THAT 150 F. OVEN! If you read that advice online someone was
>intentionally trying to get you to destroy your camera. If you thought of that
>on your own ... I don't think you deserve to have a camera.


You place too much value on the camera. Some of us see them as a tool
that gets the crap beat out of them in every day life...as a way of
life. That and every one had to start some where. Often education can
be an expensive experience.

Roger

 
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Robert Coe
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      09-16-2007
On Sun, 09 Sep 2007 21:23:20 -0500, Allen <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
: Ed Mullikin wrote:
: > I don't know if this would work on a digital camera but I dumped my Pentax
: > 35 mm film camera in a river by upsetting a canoe. I had access to a vacuum
: > oven in a lab so I heated it to 130F and pulled a vacuum on it. It took
: > care of the problem and I used my camera for years thereafter. The photos
: > showed a little damage when developed. I might suggest trying a school's
: > chem lab if you can get access to it.
: >
: I had a similar experience with my Canon FTbn. I was wading in a creek
: (wearing what we used to call tennis shoes) when I kicked a submerged
: rock, hard enough to break my big toe. Having other things on my mind, I
: dropped the camera into the water and it got thoroughly soaked. I went
: home, took the film out and put it in my kitchen oven at 180 degrees for
: about a half hour. I continued using it for several more years, until
: the EOS line came out. I don't know if a treatment like this would go
: any good for a digital, but if the alternative is to discard it, it
: would be worth a try. (I can't remember what happened to the film.)

The situations aren't entirely comparable, but I once poured coffee into one
of those fine old keyboards that IBM used to make in the 1980s. They're almost
indestructible, but the liquid did render this one inoperable. I put it aside
(propped against a wall in my office) until it dried out. I tested it
occasionally, and after about six months it started working again. I believe
it's one of the keyboards I still use. (I have a fair collection of them,
since it's the only model I'll use on my non-laptop computers.) So I don't
think I'd give up just yet if I were you.

Of course you'll need a camera in the meantime, so you have two choices: buy
one that complements your hosed camera and will serve as a useful spare if the
latter comes back to life, or buy a good camera (new or used) and relegate the
hosed one to be the spare if it survives.

You could, of course, send it back to the factory, but their advice is likely
to be similar to what you've been getting from us. Otherwise, they'd have to
actually test each component, and that could get expensive rather quickly.

Bob
 
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Allen
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      09-16-2007
Robert Coe wrote:
<snip>
>
> The situations aren't entirely comparable, but I once poured coffee into one
> of those fine old keyboards that IBM used to make in the 1980s. They're almost
> indestructible, but the liquid did render this one inoperable. I put it aside
> (propped against a wall in my office) until it dried out. I tested it
> occasionally, and after about six months it started working again. I believe
> it's one of the keyboards I still use. (I have a fair collection of them,
> since it's the only model I'll use on my non-laptop computers.) So I don't
> think I'd give up just yet if I were you.
>

<snip>
> Bob


I never did this, but several people that I worked with did; I don't
believe we ever actually lost a KB. The worst case that I encountered
was when an employee spilled coffee (with cream and sugar) on a 5.25"
360K floppy ( that really dates it). That floppy had valuable data on
it, so I took an Xacto knife and removed a very narrow strip of plastic
from the edge, making sure that the interior disc was as far from that
edge as possible. I then carefully washed and blotted the disc dry. I
then rtrimmed the edge from a healthy diskette and substituted the
cleaned disc for the virgin one. I then copied it onto a third diskette
and Shazam! a good data diskette. Thank the Lord for CDs.
Allen
 
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