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VB or C#?

 
 
=?Utf-8?B?V29ya2luZyBkdWRlLg==?=
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      08-27-2007
Which one is more valuable in the business world? Just curious. Thanks.
 
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Steve
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      08-27-2007
I say VB. A lot of companies have already established codebases on VB,
and aren't willing to put their business at risk by switching languages.
They're also unwilling to have multiple languages in house. It just adds
to the confusion. Also, more developers were brought up on VB. Are
colleges even teaching C#? I think they teach C++ and VB, but not C#.


Steve C.
MCSD,MCAD,MCSE,MCP+I,CNE,CNA,CCNA


Working dude. wrote:
> Which one is more valuable in the business world? Just curious. Thanks.

 
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=?Utf-8?B?TGFycnlXZXN0TUNTRA==?=
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      08-28-2007
For Windows applications, I would say VB.
For Web applications, I would say C#. [although Perl and PHP rank up there]
This is based on personal experience.
If I had to give a percentage of .Net work out there (at least that I get
e-mails about), I would say 50% C#, 40% VB, 7% C++ (mainly real-time factory
automation systems), and 3% Delphi (mainly conversion from legacy systems,
although some of these are being converted to C#).

I agree with Steve that most colleges teach VB and C++, but most colleges
also teach COBOL. Having taught at a couple of colleges, all I can say is
many of them are behind the times. Mine uses textbooks written by professors
who have never worked a day in the "real world" their entire life. Whenever I
teach one of these classes, I get so tempted to write my own textbook.

If I were you, I would try to become familiar with multiple languages. It
will increase your likelihood of always having a job and getting phone calls
from Indians who can't pronounce the name of your city correctly.
--
Larry J. West, MCSD, MCPD, MCITP, MCTS x5, MOUS, FLMI, ACS
* always open to after-hours telecommute (second job) positions.
* developing personal computer software since before the PC.


"Steve" wrote:

> I say VB. A lot of companies have already established codebases on VB,
> and aren't willing to put their business at risk by switching languages.
> They're also unwilling to have multiple languages in house. It just adds
> to the confusion. Also, more developers were brought up on VB. Are
> colleges even teaching C#? I think they teach C++ and VB, but not C#.
>
>
> Steve C.
> MCSD,MCAD,MCSE,MCP+I,CNE,CNA,CCNA
>
>
> Working dude. wrote:
> > Which one is more valuable in the business world? Just curious. Thanks.

>

 
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Thor
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      08-28-2007
> If I were you, I would try to become familiar with multiple languages. It
> will increase your likelihood of always having a job and getting phone
> calls
> from Indians who can't pronounce the name of your city correctly.
> --
> Larry J. West, MCSD, MCPD, MCITP, MCTS x5, MOUS, FLMI, ACS
> * always open to after-hours telecommute (second job) positions.
> * developing personal computer software since before the PC.
>


Yeah!

....and google reflector, download and reverse-engineer all you come over (or
at least a few of the things you like).
Remember to learn sql too. 90% of write data-centric code, you need to know
this stuff. Play with it, too.

53

 
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Cerebrus
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      08-28-2007
I believe that C# is generally considered more popular across
corporates than VB.NET/VB 2005. There also seems to be the (erroneous)
impression that a C# programmer is more proficient than a VB.NET
programmer.

Tiobe maintains a programming language popularity index at :
http://www.tiobe.com/tpci.htm. Since they treat Classic VB, VB.NET and
VB 2005 as different flavours of the same language, it is a bit
difficult to compare the exact numbers.

It's easy to be proficient on both languages, since the differences
are none other than syntactical sugar... underneath they're both
compiled to MSIL.


 
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Cerebrus
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      08-28-2007
On Aug 28, 6:34 pm, LarryWestMCSD <LarryWest-at-hotmail-dot-com>
wrote:
>
> If I were you, I would try to become familiar with multiple languages. It
> will increase your likelihood of always having a job and getting phone calls
> from Indians who can't pronounce the name of your city correctly.


Looks like my fellow tribesmen are pestering you again with their
warcries... Apologies on their behalf, my friend.

 
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=?Utf-8?B?TGFycnlXZXN0TUNTRA==?=
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      08-29-2007
In my experience, companies that use VB .Net do so under the belief that VB
programmers are cheaper and more plentiful than C# programmers -- probably
because that's what the schools churn out. [I think that your average C#
programmer is more proficient simply because the newby college students skew
the VB numbers downward.]

Companies that use C# do so because it is supposedly faster to execute the
programs and Visual Basic is still considered a "toy language", true in the
past, but since both compile to the CLR (Common Language Runtime), it really
doesn't matter which language you use.

Again, you should learn both languages, perhaps C++ as well since there may
come a time you want to do unmanaged code, which can only be done in C++.
Personally, I've taken exams in all three - VB, C#, and C++. Unfortunately,
there is no way on the transcript to show this for the .Net 2.0 exams like
you could for the .Net 1.0 (MCAD/MCSD).
--
Larry J. West, MCSD, MCPD, MCITP, MCTS x5, MOUS, FLMI, ACS
* always open to after-hours telecommute (second job) positions.
* developing personal computer software since before the PC.


"Cerebrus" wrote:

> I believe that C# is generally considered more popular across
> corporates than VB.NET/VB 2005. There also seems to be the (erroneous)
> impression that a C# programmer is more proficient than a VB.NET
> programmer.
>
> Tiobe maintains a programming language popularity index at :
> http://www.tiobe.com/tpci.htm. Since they treat Classic VB, VB.NET and
> VB 2005 as different flavours of the same language, it is a bit
> difficult to compare the exact numbers.
>
> It's easy to be proficient on both languages, since the differences
> are none other than syntactical sugar... underneath they're both
> compiled to MSIL.

 
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=?Utf-8?B?TGFycnlXZXN0TUNTRA==?=
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      08-29-2007
Apologies accepted.
<rant>
What irritates me are the ones who pretend to be in the United States that
mispronounce my city. It's pronounced "Lew-uh-vull," like the baseball bat
which is made here (and thanks to an Australian law, made only here and not
in Indiana like it used to be).
I'll give a benefit of the doubt to Coloradans, since their Louisville is
actually pronounced Lou-iss-vil, but for someone pretending to be in America
pronouncing it Lew-iss-vil-lee (four syllables) automatically makes me not
want to work with that person.
I don't know of a single city in America ending in -ville that is pronounced
villy. Are there such cities in India? In Kentucky there is a city named
Versailles that is not pronounced like the French place, but actually
pronounced Ver-sales, so perhaps there are wierd pronunciations over there.
If they would just tell me they are from over there, and not lie or pretend,
I might give them the benefit of the doubt.

If they can't get the city correct, and are lying about where they are based
out of, then what else about the position do they have wrong and/or are lying
about?
</rant>
Now I feel better, thanks.
--
Larry J. West, MCSD, MCPD, MCITP, MCTS x5, MOUS, FLMI, ACS
* always open to after-hours telecommute (second job) positions.
* developing personal computer software since before the PC.


"Cerebrus" wrote:

> On Aug 28, 6:34 pm, LarryWestMCSD <LarryWest-at-hotmail-dot-com>
> wrote:
> >
> > If I were you, I would try to become familiar with multiple languages. It
> > will increase your likelihood of always having a job and getting phone calls
> > from Indians who can't pronounce the name of your city correctly.

>
> Looks like my fellow tribesmen are pestering you again with their
> warcries... Apologies on their behalf, my friend.

 
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=?Utf-8?B?cmViZGQ=?=
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      08-31-2007
yeah the more languages the better so far i learned about 6 languages
it kinda fun programming to show the world your ideas. but i totally
agree aon the multiple language thing . And one thing i dont like is the in
house one language thing thats why i can never stick one company i wont
learn anything

"Cerebrus" wrote:

> On Aug 28, 6:34 pm, LarryWestMCSD <LarryWest-at-hotmail-dot-com>
> wrote:
> >
> > If I were you, I would try to become familiar with multiple languages. It
> > will increase your likelihood of always having a job and getting phone calls
> > from Indians who can't pronounce the name of your city correctly.

>
> Looks like my fellow tribesmen are pestering you again with their
> warcries... Apologies on their behalf, my friend.
>
>

 
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