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How to change Vista shell font

 
 
Joe Maldon
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      08-16-2007
Hi,

Just installed Vista and don't like the shell font (Segoe UI I believe?)

Is there a way to change it so the GUI looks like XP? Maybe Tahoma!?!?

Thanks.

Joe Maldon.
 
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WhzzKdd
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      08-16-2007
"Joe Maldon" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:fa2943$itk$(E-Mail Removed)2surf.net...
> Hi,
>
> Just installed Vista and don't like the shell font (Segoe UI I believe?)
>
> Is there a way to change it so the GUI looks like XP? Maybe Tahoma!?!?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Joe Maldon.



Right-click the desktop, select Personalize, then Window Color and
Appearance, then click "Open classic properties for more color options, in
that dialog box, click Advanced. There, in a dialog box similar to one in
XP, you will find the options to change fonts for much of the system.


 
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Joe Maldon
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      08-17-2007
>
> Right-click the desktop, select Personalize, then Window Color and
> Appearance, then click "Open classic properties for more color options, in
> that dialog box, click Advanced. There, in a dialog box similar to one in
> XP, you will find the options to change fonts for much of the system.
>


Done that but still get some dialog boxes which have Segoe UI displayed. Any
ideas please?

Thanks.

Joe Maldon.

 
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Evan Platt
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Posts: n/a
 
      08-17-2007
On Fri, 17 Aug 2007 15:20:51 +0100, "Joe Maldon"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Done that but still get some dialog boxes which have Segoe UI displayed. Any
>ideas please?


What dialog boxes?
--
To reply via e-mail, remove The Obvious from my e-mail address.
 
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Joe Maldon
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      08-17-2007
>
> What dialog boxes?
>


e.g. Control Panel | Date and Time

Everything else std fonts (as per XP). Just various dialogues Vista font.
Horrible on my flat panel!!!!! I thought ClearType was supposed to make
fonts better .... they actually look worse ... std fresh install vista on a
Dell E520 ATI X1300 Pro card. Thought these Vista fonts were supposed to be
an improvement. I feel they are a backward step?!?!???!

Joe Maldon.

 
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WhzzKdd
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-17-2007
"Joe Maldon" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:fa4isj$ch$(E-Mail Removed)2surf.net...
> >
>> What dialog boxes?
>>

>
> e.g. Control Panel | Date and Time
>
> Everything else std fonts (as per XP). Just various dialogues Vista font.
> Horrible on my flat panel!!!!! I thought ClearType was supposed to make
> fonts better .... they actually look worse ... std fresh install vista on
> a Dell E520 ATI X1300 Pro card. Thought these Vista fonts were supposed to
> be an improvement. I feel they are a backward step?!?!???!
>
> Joe Maldon.


Mine is fine. Quite readable. Both on the laptop and the desktop with the
19" LCD.

Do you have the correct resolution (native) chosen for the flat panel?
Quoted from Windows' help files:

"The best display for an LCD monitor

If you have an LCD monitor, check your screen resolution, which helps to
determine the clarity of on-screen images and objects. It's a good practice
to set LCD monitors to the native resolution-the resolution a monitor was
designed to display best, based on its size. The monitor manufacturer or
reseller should be able to provide the native resolution. If you can't get
this information, you can try setting the monitor to the highest available
resolution, which is usually the native resolution. See Change screen
resolution.

LCD monitors can technically support lower resolutions than their native
resolution, but the image might be small, centered on the screen, and edged
with black; or the image will look stretched."

Have you played with the various options of font smoothing? (Also quoted
from Windows' help files - click start, help and support, search for
cleartype)

"Make text easier to read using ClearType

ClearType font technology makes the text on your screen almost as sharp and
clear as text that is printed on paper. It is on by default in this version
of Windows.

To get the full benefit of ClearType, you'll need a high-quality, flat-panel
monitor, such as LCD or plasma. Even on a CRT monitor, you might get some
improvement in readability with ClearType.

To tune ClearType
You can use the online tuner to further adjust the legibility of on-screen
items.
Go to the Microsoft typography website, and then follow the instructions for
tuning ClearType.

To turn on ClearType
Click to open Appearance Settings.
Click Effects.
In the Effects dialog box, select Use the following method to smooth edges
of screen fonts.
Select ClearType in the list, and then click OK.

Note
Whether you select Standard or ClearType from the list, you must have a
video card and monitor that support a color setting of at least 256 colors.
You'll get the best results with High color (24-bit) or Highest color
(32-bit) support. You can change color quality in Display Settings in
Control Panel."


 
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Joe Maldon
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Posts: n/a
 
      08-17-2007

"WhzzKdd" <frack_this@email_is.invalid> wrote in message
news:46c6c419$(E-Mail Removed)2lemon.net...
> "Joe Maldon" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:fa4isj$ch$(E-Mail Removed)2surf.net...
>> >
>>> What dialog boxes?
>>>

>>
>> e.g. Control Panel | Date and Time
>>
>> Everything else std fonts (as per XP). Just various dialogues Vista font.
>> Horrible on my flat panel!!!!! I thought ClearType was supposed to make
>> fonts better .... they actually look worse ... std fresh install vista on
>> a Dell E520 ATI X1300 Pro card. Thought these Vista fonts were supposed
>> to be an improvement. I feel they are a backward step?!?!???!
>>
>> Joe Maldon.

>
> Mine is fine. Quite readable. Both on the laptop and the desktop with the
> 19" LCD.
>
> Do you have the correct resolution (native) chosen for the flat panel?
> Quoted from Windows' help files:
>
> "The best display for an LCD monitor
>
> If you have an LCD monitor, check your screen resolution, which helps to
> determine the clarity of on-screen images and objects. It's a good
> practice to set LCD monitors to the native resolution-the resolution a
> monitor was designed to display best, based on its size. The monitor
> manufacturer or reseller should be able to provide the native resolution.
> If you can't get this information, you can try setting the monitor to the
> highest available resolution, which is usually the native resolution. See
> Change screen resolution.
>
> LCD monitors can technically support lower resolutions than their native
> resolution, but the image might be small, centered on the screen, and
> edged with black; or the image will look stretched."
>
> Have you played with the various options of font smoothing? (Also quoted
> from Windows' help files - click start, help and support, search for
> cleartype)
>
> "Make text easier to read using ClearType
>
> ClearType font technology makes the text on your screen almost as sharp
> and clear as text that is printed on paper. It is on by default in this
> version of Windows.
>
> To get the full benefit of ClearType, you'll need a high-quality,
> flat-panel monitor, such as LCD or plasma. Even on a CRT monitor, you
> might get some improvement in readability with ClearType.
>
> To tune ClearType
> You can use the online tuner to further adjust the legibility of on-screen
> items.
> Go to the Microsoft typography website, and then follow the instructions
> for tuning ClearType.
>
> To turn on ClearType
> Click to open Appearance Settings.
> Click Effects.
> In the Effects dialog box, select Use the following method to smooth edges
> of screen fonts.
> Select ClearType in the list, and then click OK.
>
> Note
> Whether you select Standard or ClearType from the list, you must have a
> video card and monitor that support a color setting of at least 256
> colors. You'll get the best results with High color (24-bit) or Highest
> color (32-bit) support. You can change color quality in Display Settings
> in Control Panel."
>


Done all that. 1280x1024 tuned cleartype and I just see it as blurred
comparing it to standard. Don't see it as sharp at all ... in fact very NOT
sharp around the edges!

 
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WhzzKdd
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-18-2007
"Joe Maldon" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:fa4umr$7g1$(E-Mail Removed)2surf.net...
>
> "WhzzKdd" <frack_this@email_is.invalid> wrote in message
> news:46c6c419$(E-Mail Removed)2lemon.net...
>> "Joe Maldon" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:fa4isj$ch$(E-Mail Removed)2surf.net...
>>> >
>>>> What dialog boxes?
>>>>
>>>
>>> e.g. Control Panel | Date and Time
>>>
>>> Everything else std fonts (as per XP). Just various dialogues Vista
>>> font. Horrible on my flat panel!!!!! I thought ClearType was supposed to
>>> make fonts better .... they actually look worse ... std fresh install
>>> vista on a Dell E520 ATI X1300 Pro card. Thought these Vista fonts were
>>> supposed to be an improvement. I feel they are a backward step?!?!???!
>>>
>>> Joe Maldon.

>>
>> Mine is fine. Quite readable. Both on the laptop and the desktop with the
>> 19" LCD.
>>
>> Do you have the correct resolution (native) chosen for the flat panel?
>> Quoted from Windows' help files:
>>
>> "The best display for an LCD monitor
>>
>> If you have an LCD monitor, check your screen resolution, which helps to
>> determine the clarity of on-screen images and objects. It's a good
>> practice to set LCD monitors to the native resolution-the resolution a
>> monitor was designed to display best, based on its size. The monitor
>> manufacturer or reseller should be able to provide the native resolution.
>> If you can't get this information, you can try setting the monitor to the
>> highest available resolution, which is usually the native resolution. See
>> Change screen resolution.
>>
>> LCD monitors can technically support lower resolutions than their native
>> resolution, but the image might be small, centered on the screen, and
>> edged with black; or the image will look stretched."
>>
>> Have you played with the various options of font smoothing? (Also quoted
>> from Windows' help files - click start, help and support, search for
>> cleartype)
>>
>> "Make text easier to read using ClearType
>>
>> ClearType font technology makes the text on your screen almost as sharp
>> and clear as text that is printed on paper. It is on by default in this
>> version of Windows.
>>
>> To get the full benefit of ClearType, you'll need a high-quality,
>> flat-panel monitor, such as LCD or plasma. Even on a CRT monitor, you
>> might get some improvement in readability with ClearType.
>>
>> To tune ClearType
>> You can use the online tuner to further adjust the legibility of
>> on-screen items.
>> Go to the Microsoft typography website, and then follow the instructions
>> for tuning ClearType.
>>
>> To turn on ClearType
>> Click to open Appearance Settings.
>> Click Effects.
>> In the Effects dialog box, select Use the following method to smooth
>> edges of screen fonts.
>> Select ClearType in the list, and then click OK.
>>
>> Note
>> Whether you select Standard or ClearType from the list, you must have a
>> video card and monitor that support a color setting of at least 256
>> colors. You'll get the best results with High color (24-bit) or Highest
>> color (32-bit) support. You can change color quality in Display Settings
>> in Control Panel."
>>

>
> Done all that. 1280x1024 tuned cleartype and I just see it as blurred
> comparing it to standard. Don't see it as sharp at all ... in fact very
> NOT sharp around the edges!


Re-read the above help file information: ClearType isn't designed to
"sharpen" text. In fact, it is designed to "smooth" the fonts. On my system,
it puts a shadow behind the text, I'm assuming that's to make it stand off
the background a bit.

One more thing to look at from the help files:

"Can I make on-screen fonts clearer?

Yes. Typically, the higher the dots per inch (DPI), the better the fonts
will look. For more information, see Make the text on your screen larger or
smaller.
If you set the DPI higher than 96, and you are running Windows Aero (the
premium visual experience of Windows Vista), the text and other items on the
screen might appear blurry in some programs that are not designed for
high-DPI display in this version of Windows. You can avoid this issue by
using Windows XP style DPI scaling for these programs.

To make text and on-screen items clearer in programs that aren't designed
for high DPI
Click to open Personalization.
In the left pane, click Adjust font size (DPI). If you are prompted for an
administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide
confirmation.
In the DPI Scaling dialog box, click Custom DPI.
Select the Use Windows XP style DPI scaling check box, and then click OK."


 
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