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too much light

 
 
Desert Dweller
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      07-18-2007
Say it's a bright sunny day and you see a stream. You want to take a
creative exposure of the stream such that is shows motion. You clamp
down the aperture as much as possible and set the shutter speed to 4
seconds.

Your light meter shows you are way overexposed. You set the ISO as slow
as possible, to say ISO50. Still your light meter shows you are overexposed.

What do you do in this situation to get the correct exposure? Is this
where the ND filters I've been reading about come into play? Or do you
need some sort of solar eclipse filter to get the shot?

--
DD
 
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Gladiator
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      07-18-2007
On Wed, 18 Jul 2007 00:25:51 -0700, Desert Dweller
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Say it's a bright sunny day and you see a stream. You want to take a
>creative exposure of the stream such that is shows motion.


What's creative about that? Every tom, dick and harry has emulated
that shot. To be creative you have to be original.
 
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Ray Paseur
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      07-18-2007
Desert Dweller <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
news:Y9jni.41$(E-Mail Removed):

> Say it's a bright sunny day and you see a stream. You want to take a
> creative exposure of the stream such that is shows motion. You clamp
> down the aperture as much as possible and set the shutter speed to 4
> seconds.
>
> Your light meter shows you are way overexposed. You set the ISO as
> slow as possible, to say ISO50. Still your light meter shows you are
> overexposed.
>
> What do you do in this situation to get the correct exposure? Is this
> where the ND filters I've been reading about come into play? Or do you
> need some sort of solar eclipse filter to get the shot?
>
> --
> DD


DD: This is a perfect application for neutral density filters, which can be
stacked to get the correct levels of darkness. You'll also need a sturdy
tripod. If you are using a DSLR-type camera, consider mirror-lock-up, too.
With MLU, you compose the scene, then lock the mirror up (to avoid
vibration from the mirror slap) before you open the shutter. HTH, ~Ray
 
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ASAAR
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      07-18-2007
On Wed, 18 Jul 2007 00:25:51 -0700, Desert Dweller wrote:

> Say it's a bright sunny day and you see a stream. You want to take a
> creative exposure of the stream such that is shows motion. You clamp
> down the aperture as much as possible and set the shutter speed to 4
> seconds.


Maybe if it's a stream of a slow lava flow. Four seconds seems
far too long for even a slowly moving stream of water. Try several
different shutter speeds to see which gets the best effect.


> Your light meter shows you are way overexposed. You set the ISO as slow
> as possible, to say ISO50. Still your light meter shows you are overexposed.
>
> What do you do in this situation to get the correct exposure? Is this
> where the ND filters I've been reading about come into play? Or do you
> need some sort of solar eclipse filter to get the shot?


Do you have a digital camera yet, or is the mention of a light
meter just hypothetical, to help pose your question? Yes, ND
filters can help, as can two other methods. You can wait for
sunrise or sunset, when there will be much less light. This may
even help produce better pictures, as there won't be bright sunlight
to create harsh shadows, and many photographers prefer shooting when
the sun is low in the sky. You could also wait longer until a solar
eclipse occurs, but then you may not want shots of the stream.

 
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C J Campbell
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      07-18-2007
On 2007-07-18 00:25:51 -0700, Desert Dweller <(E-Mail Removed)> said:

> Say it's a bright sunny day and you see a stream. You want to take a
> creative exposure of the stream such that is shows motion. You clamp
> down the aperture as much as possible and set the shutter speed to 4
> seconds.


Try 1/8 second. The water will look almost exactly the same as at 4 seconds.

>
> Your light meter shows you are way overexposed. You set the ISO as slow
> as possible, to say ISO50. Still your light meter shows you are overexposed.
>
> What do you do in this situation to get the correct exposure? Is this
> where the ND filters I've been reading about come into play? Or do you
> need some sort of solar eclipse filter to get the shot?


Neutral density filters will work, or you could wait for twilight.
--
Waddling Eagle
World Famous Flight Instructor

 
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C J Campbell
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      07-18-2007
On 2007-07-18 00:40:45 -0700, Gladiator <(E-Mail Removed)> said:

> On Wed, 18 Jul 2007 00:25:51 -0700, Desert Dweller
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Say it's a bright sunny day and you see a stream. You want to take a
>> creative exposure of the stream such that is shows motion.

>
> What's creative about that? Every tom, dick and harry has emulated
> that shot. To be creative you have to be original.


You are right. The shot is not creative at all and has become trite.
You almost want to slap someone who takes yet another flowing stream,
or a bee on a flower, or a mountain reflected in a lake at sunset, etc.
Trite as they are, however, you can learn a great deal by attempting to
'reverse engineer' a picture. The OP will not become creative until he
learns the techniques he wants to know. Let him practice on the stream,
taking the same tired old picture that everybody else does. Then, when
he has polished his skills, he will seek for a vision of his own. Maybe.

--
Waddling Eagle
World Famous Flight Instructor

 
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Gladiator
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      07-18-2007
On Wed, 18 Jul 2007 07:40:46 -0700, C J Campbell
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:


>You are right. The shot is not creative at all and has become trite.
>You almost want to slap someone who takes yet another flowing stream,
>or a bee on a flower, or a mountain reflected in a lake at sunset, etc.
>Trite as they are, however, you can learn a great deal by attempting to
>'reverse engineer' a picture. The OP will not become creative until he
>learns the techniques he wants to know. Let him practice on the stream,
>taking the same tired old picture that everybody else does. Then, when
>he has polished his skills, he will seek for a vision of his own. Maybe.


OK, I can agree with that. Trying to emulate Ansel Adams is how I got
my feet wet too.
 
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ASAAR
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      07-18-2007
On Wed, 18 Jul 2007 18:09:13 GMT, Gladiator wrote:

>> You are right. The shot is not creative at all and has become trite.
>> You almost want to slap someone who takes yet another flowing stream,
>> or a bee on a flower, or a mountain reflected in a lake at sunset, etc.
>> Trite as they are, however, you can learn a great deal by attempting to
>> 'reverse engineer' a picture. The OP will not become creative until he
>> learns the techniques he wants to know. Let him practice on the stream,
>> taking the same tired old picture that everybody else does. Then, when
>> he has polished his skills, he will seek for a vision of his own. Maybe.

>
> OK, I can agree with that. Trying to emulate Ansel Adams is how I got
> my feet wet too.


How embarrassing. I hope there weren't any other photographers or
bystanders nearby to witness your moment of weakness.

 
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John Sheehy
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      07-18-2007
ASAAR <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in news:nsts93dn2ekl0u7u7tgbjqslr3hrqibgu6@
4ax.com:

> How embarrassing. I hope there weren't any other photographers or
> bystanders nearby to witness your moment of weakness.


That can't be as embarrasing as putting a little 3-ounce P&S camera on a 7-
section 6 foot tripod with hollow aluminum legs, and having the camera
bounce around and the legs vibrate when you press the release button on the
camera.

Not that I've done that, but I've seen it far too often. These random
strangers never seem to learn that you can hold a camera steadier than a
joke tripod can, for short exposures.

--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <(E-Mail Removed)>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><

 
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ASAAR
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      07-18-2007
On Wed, 18 Jul 2007 23:32:24 GMT, John Sheehy wrote:

>> How embarrassing. I hope there weren't any other photographers or
>> bystanders nearby to witness your moment of weakness.

>
> That can't be as embarrasing as putting a little 3-ounce P&S camera on a 7-
> section 6 foot tripod with hollow aluminum legs, and having the camera
> bounce around and the legs vibrate when you press the release button on the
> camera.
>
> Not that I've done that, but I've seen it far too often. These random
> strangers never seem to learn that you can hold a camera steadier than a
> joke tripod can, for short exposures.


It's hard to imagine how bad that would be, if you can actually
notice tripod sway from a slight distance. Even with a decent
Manfrotto CF tripod (not supporting a weight) I've had to pause
briefly when slight breezes made a P&S camera's movement noticeable
in the viewfinder.
 
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