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Ping Requests - How to block?

 
 
doS
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-02-2007
yes he is just too stoopid to know it

"WhzzKdd" <frack_this@email_is.invalid> wrote in message
news:ODWhi.54$(E-Mail Removed)...
> "Lowe Stokes" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:f69c9p$673$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Dr. §¤¤§ wrote:
>>> "Lowe Stokes" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>> news:f6994q$gmg$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>> Hi,
>>>>
>>>> I am using WinXP-SP2 and connect to the Internet through Charter Cable.
>>>> I have Zone Alarm freshly installed but also tried Kerio in an attempt
>>>> to block ping requests.
>>>>
>>>> I test my system at Gibson Research using the Shields Up program and
>>>> everything passes except for the ping test.
>>>>
>>>> Here is the message from Gibson:
>>>>
>>>> "Ping Reply: RECEIVED (FAILED) - Your system REPLIED to our Ping (ICMP
>>>> Echo) requests, making it visible on the Internet. Most personal
>>>> firewalls can be configured to block, drop, and ignore such ping
>>>> requests in order to better hide systems from hackers. This is highly
>>>> recommended since "Ping" is among the oldest and most common methods
>>>> used to locate systems prior to further exploitation."
>>>>
>>>> I am not an expert on these matters, by any means, so when the request
>>>> above is to configure my firewall to block, drop, or ignore pings, it
>>>> is a foreign language to me.
>>>
>>> You're not behind a router?
>>>
>>> Get a router. It's got a hardware firewall that'll give you loads more
>>> protection than any consumer-grade software firewall could.
>>>
>>> Use the router as your inbound protection. Run your software firewall as
>>> your outbound protection.
>>>
>>> The router keeps unwanted things out. The software firewall keeps
>>> unwanted things already in your computer from inviting in even worse
>>> things.
>>>
>>>

>>
>> No, I don't believe I am. I just have a wireless modem in the house and
>> a splitter connected to the cable box outside.
>> I don't actually even have wireless, just a wireless modem with an
>> Ethernet cord running to both computers that are online.
>>
>> The Charter representatives who installed it never said anything about a
>> router, I bet they cheated me out of it because I don't know anything
>> about high speed connections.
>>
>>

> If your cable modem is wireless and has multiple CAT5 connections, it has
> a router IN IT. What is the make and model?
>
> --
> I've taken a vow of poverty. To annoy me, send money.
>


 
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doS
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-02-2007
you have been cheated out of anything except common sense...all isps provide
a ping to the modems.It called network monitoring.You'd be one of the
dumba**who called and complains if your service went down.your Netgear modem
is a router modem combo


"Lowe Stokes" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:f6994q$gmg$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hi,
>
> I am using WinXP-SP2 and connect to the Internet through Charter Cable. I
> have Zone Alarm freshly installed but also tried Kerio in an attempt to
> block ping requests.
>
> I test my system at Gibson Research using the Shields Up program and
> everything passes except for the ping test.
>
> Here is the message from Gibson:
>
> "Ping Reply: RECEIVED (FAILED) — Your system REPLIED to our Ping (ICMP
> Echo) requests, making it visible on the Internet. Most personal firewalls
> can be configured to block, drop, and ignore such ping requests in order
> to better hide systems from hackers. This is highly recommended since
> "Ping" is among the oldest and most common methods used to locate systems
> prior to further exploitation."
>
> I am not an expert on these matters, by any means, so when the request
> above is to configure my firewall to block, drop, or ignore pings, it is a
> foreign language to me.
>
> First I just had the regular old Windows Firewall, but ran the test and
> decided to try Kerio Personal2, I believe it was called. The test still
> failed and I received the same message I did above. I go to configuring
> and messing around with the ping settings in Kerio, which I understand I
> should not have done now, and naturally I could no longer download a
> webpage at all. Uninstalled Kerio.
>
> So, you know, I figure, probably incorrectly, that Kerio must not be able
> to get it done, so I install Zone Alarm, the one that is supposed to
> automatically fix everything just like it is supposed to be. It didn't, I
> guess it didn't because the Gibson test still fails.
>
> Is it impossible to stop ping requests when you are using a cable
> connection or something? I use to have dial up and every test passed like
> a charm.
>
> Any pertinent information that I may have left out, just ask me and I will
> supply it right away.
>
> Thanks
>
> Stinky


 
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Pennywise@DerryMaine.Gov
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      07-02-2007
Lowe Stokes <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>> If your cable modem is wireless and has multiple CAT5 connections, it has a
>> router IN IT. What is the make and model?


>Netgear Wireless Cable Modem Gateway
>CG814WG V2


In your browser's address type it: 192.168.0.1 <enter>
if you are able to access the router, you can make your changes there.
--

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http://tinyurl.com/2j43rj
 
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WhzzKdd
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      07-02-2007
"Lowe Stokes" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:f69ddp$e6b$(E-Mail Removed)...
> WhzzKdd wrote:
>> "Lowe Stokes" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:f69c9p$673$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>> Dr. §¤¤§ wrote:
>>>> "Lowe Stokes" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>> news:f6994q$gmg$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>> Hi,
>>>>>
>>>>> I am using WinXP-SP2 and connect to the Internet through Charter
>>>>> Cable. I have Zone Alarm freshly installed but also tried Kerio in an
>>>>> attempt to block ping requests.
>>>>>
>>>>> I test my system at Gibson Research using the Shields Up program and
>>>>> everything passes except for the ping test.
>>>>>
>>>>> Here is the message from Gibson:
>>>>>
>>>>> "Ping Reply: RECEIVED (FAILED) — Your system REPLIED to our Ping (ICMP
>>>>> Echo) requests, making it visible on the Internet. Most personal
>>>>> firewalls can be configured to block, drop, and ignore such ping
>>>>> requests in order to better hide systems from hackers. This is highly
>>>>> recommended since "Ping" is among the oldest and most common methods
>>>>> used to locate systems prior to further exploitation."
>>>>>
>>>>> I am not an expert on these matters, by any means, so when the request
>>>>> above is to configure my firewall to block, drop, or ignore pings, it
>>>>> is a foreign language to me.
>>>> You're not behind a router?
>>>>
>>>> Get a router. It's got a hardware firewall that'll give you loads more
>>>> protection than any consumer-grade software firewall could.
>>>>
>>>> Use the router as your inbound protection. Run your software firewall
>>>> as your outbound protection.
>>>>
>>>> The router keeps unwanted things out. The software firewall keeps
>>>> unwanted things already in your computer from inviting in even worse
>>>> things.
>>>>
>>>>
>>> No, I don't believe I am. I just have a wireless modem in the house and
>>> a splitter connected to the cable box outside.
>>> I don't actually even have wireless, just a wireless modem with an
>>> Ethernet cord running to both computers that are online.
>>>
>>> The Charter representatives who installed it never said anything about a
>>> router, I bet they cheated me out of it because I don't know anything
>>> about high speed connections.
>>>
>>>

>> If your cable modem is wireless and has multiple CAT5 connections, it has
>> a router IN IT. What is the make and model?
>>

>
> Netgear Wireless Cable Modem Gateway
> CG814WG V2



Nice unit - everything you need in one box. Here's the manual:
http://www.simplehelp.net/images/cab...ar_CG814WG.pdf

Definately a router. In your web browser, you should be able to access the
Netgear settings by putting 192.168.0.1 in the address line and pressing
enter. But the ISP may have set a password on the unit.

If you can get in, be sure you check to be sure the wireless (radio) is off,
since you aren't using it.

--
I've taken a vow of poverty. To annoy me, send money.


 
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Mike Easter
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-02-2007
Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
> Mike Easter wrote:


>> Your ping echo from grc or anywhere else is echo/ing from the cable
>> modem before it ever gets to anything 'after' [on your side of] the
>> cable modem, your side such as a router or your computer - which
>> computer is running your firewall.

>
> My cable modem doesn't echo any pings...


I've only owned/used about 3 cable modems and they all echo/ed pings.
They would of course even echo pings in their 'standby' mode, in which
mode they are disengaged from the computer/router side of the modem, but
still in communication with their own upstream network.

Every time I've ever tried to ping an 'identifiable'/known someone's
cable modem whose modem was 'online' - where online in this context
means cable connected and powered up, it echo/ed pings.

But, that doesn't mean that every cable modem echoes pings.


--
Mike Easter

 
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Dr. =?ISO-8859-1?Q?=A7=A4=A4=A7?=
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-02-2007
"Lowe Stokes" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:f69c9p$673$(E-Mail Removed)...
> No, I don't believe I am. I just have a wireless modem in the house and a
> splitter connected to the cable box outside.
> I don't actually even have wireless, just a wireless modem with an
> Ethernet cord running to both computers that are online.
>
> The Charter representatives who installed it never said anything about a
> router, I bet they cheated me out of it because I don't know anything
> about high speed connections.


Well, if you're not using the wireless, I'd suggest disabling it in the
modem setup. At the very least, make sure it's secured by disabling SSID
broadcast, and make sure it's using either WEP or WPA encryption (WPA is
much preferred, as it's more secure).

While you're in the modem setup, see if it's got a built-in router (some
nowadays do), and if so, you might be already protected. Just look around
for something that say "Block pings" and enable it.

Now, with that in mind, here's a bit of info:
A friend had a cable modem with a built-in router. I left the username and
password for logging into the router setup what the cable company had set up
specifically for this account (they set up each modem so that to log into
it, you have to put your user name and a cable company supplied password...
which they are loath to give out, but will when pressured). I changed the
setup to block pings... apparently the cable company didn't like that
because the next time I visited my friend, the username and password had
been changed, and the modem again responded to pings!

I called them, and they said that this was how they determined if the modem
was working and online... by pinging it. Stupid way of doing things, but...

So, I cracked into the modem setup, changed the username and password, and
blocked pings again.

The cable company hasn't complained, since I was pretty hard on them about
changing settings for a person's protective hardware without their consent,
and locking them out of the modem setup.

Anyway, if the modem doesn't have a built-in router, run out to CompUSA or
Radio Shack, etc., and get yourself a Linksys BEFSR41 router. It's just a
very simple router, but it's got everything you need to secure your
connection. Actually, I'd recommend doing that even if the cable modem's got
a router... I don't trust all-in-one devices like that.

Put that between your modem and your computers, and set it up (with help
from those here, if necessary).

HTH, HAND


 
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Beauregard T. Shagnasty
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-02-2007
Mike Easter wrote:

> Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
>> Mike Easter wrote:

>
>>> Your ping echo from grc or anywhere else is echo/ing from the cable
>>> modem before it ever gets to anything 'after' [on your side of] the
>>> cable modem, your side such as a router or your computer - which
>>> computer is running your firewall.

>>
>> My cable modem doesn't echo any pings...

>
> I've only owned/used about 3 cable modems and they all echo/ed pings.
> They would of course even echo pings in their 'standby' mode, in
> which mode they are disengaged from the computer/router side of the
> modem, but still in communication with their own upstream network.
>
> Every time I've ever tried to ping an 'identifiable'/known someone's
> cable modem whose modem was 'online' - where online in this context
> means cable connected and powered up, it echo/ed pings.
>
> But, that doesn't mean that every cable modem echoes pings.


I've not had any that responded to pings. Been on RoadRunner for ten
years, had several (3?) modems, and those online testing sites like GRC
and pcflank.com always say 'no response to ping.' Now, and in pre-router
days as well.

Without the router, and with the PFW turned off, the _computer_ will
respond to a ping.

The router does have an option to respond or not respond to pings, but
the modem never responded. The current modem is a Toshiba (at the other
end of the house).

--
-bts
-Motorcycles defy gravity; cars just suck
 
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George H
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      07-02-2007
Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
> Mike Easter wrote:
>
>> Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
>>> Mike Easter wrote:
>>>> Your ping echo from grc or anywhere else is echo/ing from the cable
>>>> modem before it ever gets to anything 'after' [on your side of] the
>>>> cable modem, your side such as a router or your computer - which
>>>> computer is running your firewall.
>>> My cable modem doesn't echo any pings...

>> I've only owned/used about 3 cable modems and they all echo/ed pings.
>> They would of course even echo pings in their 'standby' mode, in
>> which mode they are disengaged from the computer/router side of the
>> modem, but still in communication with their own upstream network.
>>
>> Every time I've ever tried to ping an 'identifiable'/known someone's
>> cable modem whose modem was 'online' - where online in this context
>> means cable connected and powered up, it echo/ed pings.
>>
>> But, that doesn't mean that every cable modem echoes pings.

>



The cable modem has an IP address on the ISPs network, but it's not
trivial to know it's IP.

Most every cable company uses DHCP so the IP you'll see at
http://whatsmyip.org is the IP of the PC in question or the WAN side of
the router if one is in use.






> Without the router, and with the PFW turned off, the _computer_ will
> respond to a ping.



Correct. The modem does respond to ICMP ping as well, but, once again,
you can't easily find out if it's a 10.xx, 172.16.xx or a routeable address.


 
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Lowe Stokes
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-02-2007
Thanks to everyone who responded, all of you helped me. Before I came
here I had no clue, I only knew that something wasn't right. Thanks to
suggestions of the people in this thread, I discovered where to go and I
fixed my problem.

When Charter installed my service I didn't get any instructions or
anything, no booklets, no advice about how to do what all of you told me
how to do. They just came in and installed the modem, ran a couple of
wires and were gone.

Anyway,

I was able to access the website of 192.168.0.1 and modify my settings.

Here is what I did to solve the ping problem:

DmZ Host - Unchecked Respond to Ping

and I also changed the Remote Management setting to what I have below.

Remote Management - Unchecked Allow Remote Management

Now all the tests pass and I feel much more safe and secure. Thanks
everyone.

Lowe





 
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Maximus the mad
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-02-2007
Lowe Stokes aka http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed),after much thought,came up with this
jewel:

> Thanks to everyone who responded, all of you helped me. Before I
> came here I had no clue, I only knew that something wasn't right.
> Thanks to suggestions of the people in this thread, I discovered
> where to go and I fixed my problem.
>
> When Charter installed my service I didn't get any instructions or
> anything, no booklets, no advice about how to do what all of you told
> me how to do. They just came in and installed the modem, ran a
> couple of wires and were gone.
>
> Anyway,
>
> I was able to access the website of 192.168.0.1 and modify my
> settings.
>
> Here is what I did to solve the ping problem:
>
> DmZ Host - Unchecked Respond to Ping
>
> and I also changed the Remote Management setting to what I have below.
>
> Remote Management - Unchecked Allow Remote Management
>
> Now all the tests pass and I feel much more safe and secure. Thanks
> everyone.
>
> Lowe


Glad to hear you got it sorted out!

max
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