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New power supply (Seasonic) trouble

 
 
Martin
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      06-14-2007
I wanted to replace my old 300W power supply (Fortron FSP300-60 PN)
with a new 430W power supply (Seasonic S12), but when I do, my
computer temperature (both CPU and system) grows by about 6C (it is
about 59-60 for CPU and 40 for the system with Fortron) and the
computer becomes unstable, crashing when I play games or even play
video.
I checked the voltage in my BIOS, to see if there is some problem with
it, but the values seem almost the same for both power supplies:

Fortron 300W / Seasonic 430W
VCore: 1.632 / 1.632
+5.0V: 5.030 / 4.920
+12.0V:12.106 / 12.288
-12.0V: 12.071 / 11.907
-5.0V: -5.127 / none
+5V SB: 5.018 / 4.921

As you can see, the differences are negligible (?), with some values
slightly higher and some slightly lower. Only the -5.0 V value is
missing in Seasonic, but that should be no problem according to the
Seasonic manual.
Overall I think Seasonic should be a high-quality power supply, so I
trust the manufacturer that the voltage values are fine.

Any idea why my computer does not want to accept the new power supply?

Thanks for any advice!


MSI KT-4V
Athlon XP 3000+ (at 162 FSB - slightly underclocked for better
stability)
1024 MB DDRII
GeForce 7600 GT (AGP)
2 hard drives
1 DVD-RW
SB Live! Value
AverTV Hybrid
Windows XP Home SP2

 
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PeeCee
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      06-14-2007

"Martin" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ps.com...
I wanted to replace my old 300W power supply (Fortron FSP300-60 PN)
with a new 430W power supply (Seasonic S12), but when I do, my
computer temperature (both CPU and system) grows by about 6C (it is
about 59-60 for CPU and 40 for the system with Fortron) and the
computer becomes unstable, crashing when I play games or even play
video.
I checked the voltage in my BIOS, to see if there is some problem with
it, but the values seem almost the same for both power supplies:

Fortron 300W / Seasonic 430W
VCore: 1.632 / 1.632
+5.0V: 5.030 / 4.920
+12.0V:12.106 / 12.288
-12.0V: 12.071 / 11.907
-5.0V: -5.127 / none
+5V SB: 5.018 / 4.921

As you can see, the differences are negligible (?), with some values
slightly higher and some slightly lower. Only the -5.0 V value is
missing in Seasonic, but that should be no problem according to the
Seasonic manual.
Overall I think Seasonic should be a high-quality power supply, so I
trust the manufacturer that the voltage values are fine.

Any idea why my computer does not want to accept the new power supply?

Thanks for any advice!


MSI KT-4V
Athlon XP 3000+ (at 162 FSB - slightly underclocked for better
stability)
1024 MB DDRII
GeForce 7600 GT (AGP)
2 hard drives
1 DVD-RW
SB Live! Value
AverTV Hybrid
Windows XP Home SP2


Martin

Those temperatures seem a little on the high side.
Maybe your your case ventilation is marginal.

The Seasonic may be drawing a little less air through the case and causing
your PC to go into heat related instability.

Easy to test by opening the case and directing a desk fan at the inside
while you use it.

Best
Paul.


 
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Martin
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      06-15-2007
UPDATE:
I may have found the coause of the trouble - it may be the 360W UPS
wich wokred fine with the old 300W PSU (Fortron) but may be
insufficient for the new 430W Seasonic.
I disconnected the UPS and at least the temperatures now seem to
remain the same as they were with Fortron.
Now I have to see about stability...

I really hope this solves the problem!

 
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PeeCee
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      06-16-2007

"Martin" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ps.com...
> UPDATE:
> I may have found the coause of the trouble - it may be the 360W UPS
> wich wokred fine with the old 300W PSU (Fortron) but may be
> insufficient for the new 430W Seasonic.
> I disconnected the UPS and at least the temperatures now seem to
> remain the same as they were with Fortron.
> Now I have to see about stability...
>
> I really hope this solves the problem!
>


Martin

Now that's interesting.

Most domestic UPS's switch the mains AC directly through to the outlet
socket so in theory, while the mains AC is available, the UPS is just a link
in the mains cable and should have not effect what so ever.
The wattage on the UPS relates to when the mains AC stops (power cut) then
the outlet socket is switched over to the UPS's AC generator circuitry.
This is when the wattage rating comes into play and limits (in your case to
300 watts) the wattage you can draw from it before it overloads and trips
out.

Perhaps there is a fault in your UPS!

There are some UPS's that permanently provide mains voltage AC at their
outlet sockets from their AC generation circuitry, but these are usually
rather expensive UPS's.

Even if there is a problem with the UPS, I can't quite see how that would
affect your PC as your average PC power supply is quite tolerant to
variations in mains AC input.
The Seasonic should in fact draw a similar amount of AC current to the old
300W Fortron because mains AC draw is determined by the amount of power
drawn out of the power supply by the PC times the efficiency of the power
supply.

More to the point if the new power supply is delivering the correct voltages
then in 'theory' it should not affect the CPU etc temperatures at all.

There is 'one' possible cause I have come across that can do that, and that
is a power supply with very poor filtering on the outlet. i.e. if you look
at the voltages with an Oscilloscope, instead of a nice flat line you see a
noise voltage superimposed on the DC.
i.e. though new the Seasonic may be faulty.

I know that can affect CPU / Motherboard temperatures because I had a PC
that was (apparently) overheating quite badly. CPU temps were around 60
degrees C, and playing a DVD was enough to make it crash.
Voltmeter checks showed voltages within tolerance, so fans were added (3
more in the end) to the case to keep it cool.

When the extra fans didn't work I went and bought a new PC and put the old
one aside for later experimentation.
Some weeks later I revisited this old PC and because I didn't have a
voltmeter to hand used my Oscilloscope to check the DC voltages.
To my surprise there was nearly 1 volt of noise on the 5 volt line, the
noise being at the switching frequency of the power supply mains conversion
circuitry. The 12 volt line had a similar noise level as well.

Another power supply installed into the PC showed no noise on the DC
voltages and I ended up taking out the extra fans and the CPU temperatures
dropped into the 40's and it is still soldiering on with out problem.

The fault in the original power supply turned out to be the Chinese blown
capacitor disease.
A fault that has become so common now that I routinely open Power supplies
and check for signs of this when doing a service on a PC.

Long post but may give you some ideas.

Paul.


 
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Plato
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      06-16-2007
Martin wrote:
>
> I wanted to replace my old 300W power supply (Fortron FSP300-60 PN)
> with a new 430W power supply (Seasonic S12), but when I do, my
> computer temperature (both CPU and system) grows by about 6C (it is


Replacing a power supply does not really generate an increase in temps,
unless your case is improperly vented. Add a second case fan.

--
http://www.bootdisk.com/


 
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Martin
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      06-18-2007
Thanks for all your help!
I just found myself that the UPS is probably not the cause of my
trouble, since I connected it again and the tempreatures were fine
(i.e. the same as with the old power supply).
However, when i switched on my PC the next day, the temperatures rose
again

I will keep on experimenting with the new and the old power supply and
the UPS, and if nothing helps, I will probabaly return the new power
supply and buy a different one.
I will also try adding a chipset heatsink.
I tried adding a case fan, but makes no effect whatsoever, since I am
dong all these experiemtns with my case half-open.

I do not have any osciloscopes or voltmeters or anything, that is too
technical for me

 
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