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Starting java with C++ background

 
 
Afshin
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      06-11-2007
Hello everybody

I have some years of experience with C++ and now need to learn java. I
appreciate if you could advise me on how to get started. In the past,
I used to work with Visual C++ 5.0 and 6.0 and have recently switched
to Visual Studio 2005. I see there is a Visual J# available out there.
Is it the right place to start?

Many thanks for any comments.

Afshin

 
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Lew
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      06-11-2007
Afshin wrote:
> Hello everybody
>
> I have some years of experience with C++ and now need to learn java. I
> appreciate if you could advise me on how to get started. In the past,
> I used to work with Visual C++ 5.0 and 6.0 and have recently switched
> to Visual Studio 2005. I see there is a Visual J# available out there.
> Is it the right place to start?


No, because "J#" is not Java.

Start at
<http://java.sun.com/>
and read the tutorials
<http://java.sun.com/developer/onlineTraining/>
in particular
<http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/index.html>

That last page has a link entitled "The Really Big Index" that's worth
following after that.

--
Lew
 
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Ian Wilson
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      06-11-2007
Afshin wrote:
> Hello everybody
>
> I have some years of experience with C++ and now need to learn java. I
> appreciate if you could advise me on how to get started. In the past,
> I used to work with Visual C++ 5.0 and 6.0 and have recently switched
> to Visual Studio 2005. I see there is a Visual J# available out there.
> Is it the right place to start?
>


This question is frequently asked, I suggest you use Google Groups to
search comp.lang.java.* for previous discussion of this.


A brief and incomplete recap:

AFAIK VS2005 is an IDE, IDEs for Java include

Eclipse. http://www.eclipse.org. Open-Source. Free download.
Netbeans. http://www.netbeans.org. Open-source. Free download.
JBuilder. http://www.codegear.com/products/jbuilder. Commercial.
.... many others

I use Eclipse.
Netbeans includes a visual GUI editor called Matisse.

Good tutorials are available at http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/

Java comes in several editions, start with the standard edition. The
other editions are for mobile devices and for enterprise applications
(e.g. web-services, JSP etc)

Most people advise you to start with console applications (non-GUI) and
only progress to GUI once you've mastered the initial problems people
have with classpaths etc.

Java has several GUI toolkits. For example AWT, Swing and SWT. I suggest
you try Swing first. Learn about pluggable "Look and Feel". Learn how to
use Layout Managers. Find out about third party GUI libraries like JGoodies.

Converting from language A to B is usually hindered by the fact that
paradigms in A cannot be directly translated to B, You have to unleard
A's paradigms first and then learn B's paradigms.
Interfaces not Multiple Inheritance.
References not pointer arithmetic.
...

I'd buy some good books. I like books by O'Reilly, e.g. "Learning Java".
There's a downloadable book "Thinking in Java" by Bruce Eckel, often
recommended.

 
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rossum
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      06-11-2007
On Mon, 11 Jun 2007 02:42:28 -0700, Afshin <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>Hello everybody
>
>I have some years of experience with C++ and now need to learn java. I
>appreciate if you could advise me on how to get started. In the past,
>I used to work with Visual C++ 5.0 and 6.0 and have recently switched
>to Visual Studio 2005. I see there is a Visual J# available out there.
>Is it the right place to start?
>
>Many thanks for any comments.
>
>Afshin

J# is not Java, and not well supported by Microsoft - it is only there
as a migration from Microsoft's J++ (now withdrawn) to C#. It is
basically a J++ syntax front end for the .Net Virtual Machine. J++
worked to the Java Virtual Machine.

If you want a Visual Java style IDE then try JBuilder from Borland.
The basic edition is free.

rossum

 
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Mike Schilling
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      06-11-2007

"rossum" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Mon, 11 Jun 2007 02:42:28 -0700, Afshin <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
>>Hello everybody
>>
>>I have some years of experience with C++ and now need to learn java. I
>>appreciate if you could advise me on how to get started. In the past,
>>I used to work with Visual C++ 5.0 and 6.0 and have recently switched
>>to Visual Studio 2005. I see there is a Visual J# available out there.
>>Is it the right place to start?
>>
>>Many thanks for any comments.
>>
>>Afshin

> J# is not Java,


True.

> and not well supported by Microsoft - it is only there
> as a migration from Microsoft's J++ (now withdrawn) to C#.


False. J# is a language in its own right (neither Java now C#, though its
syntax is Java-like). Nowadays, the .NET framework comes with J# support
(it used to be an add-on) and the .NET online documentation includes J#
examples; that is, J# support is improving as time goes on.

But the important point here is your first one: J# is not Java.


 
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=?ISO-8859-1?Q?Arne_Vajh=F8j?=
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      06-12-2007
Mike Schilling wrote:
> "rossum" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> On Mon, 11 Jun 2007 02:42:28 -0700, Afshin <(E-Mail Removed)>
>> wrote:
>>> I have some years of experience with C++ and now need to learn java. I
>>> appreciate if you could advise me on how to get started. In the past,
>>> I used to work with Visual C++ 5.0 and 6.0 and have recently switched
>>> to Visual Studio 2005. I see there is a Visual J# available out there.
>>> Is it the right place to start?
>>>
>>> Many thanks for any comments.
>>>
>>> Afshin

>> J# is not Java,

>
> True.


That depends on the definition of Java.

It is a pretty good implementation of the Java 1.1
language.

The runtime environment is not Java as it runs with .NET and not
with a JVM.

>> and not well supported by Microsoft - it is only there
>> as a migration from Microsoft's J++ (now withdrawn) to C#.

>
> False. J# is a language in its own right (neither Java now C#, though its
> syntax is Java-like). Nowadays, the .NET framework comes with J# support
> (it used to be an add-on) and the .NET online documentation includes J#
> examples; that is, J# support is improving as time goes on.


It is not quite obvious to me that "it is only there as a migration"
and "a language in its own right" exclude each other.

J# is a separate package in both .NET 1.1 and 2.0, 3.0 is not a full
..NET at all and 3.5 is still in beta.

Arne
 
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David Segall
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      06-12-2007
rossum <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:


>If you want a Visual Java style IDE then try JBuilder from Borland.
>The basic edition is free.

This is true but misleading! Codegear (formerly Borland) have released
a new edition of JBuilder <http://www.codegear.com/products/jbuilder>
and it is now based on Eclipse <www.eclipse.org> which is free but not
from Codegear. The old, free JBuilder Foundation Edition is no longer
available.
 
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David Segall
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-12-2007
Afshin <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Hello everybody
>
>I have some years of experience with C++ and now need to learn java. I
>appreciate if you could advise me on how to get started. In the past,
>I used to work with Visual C++ 5.0 and 6.0 and have recently switched
>to Visual Studio 2005. I see there is a Visual J# available out there.
>Is it the right place to start?
>
>Many thanks for any comments.
>
>Afshin

 
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David Segall
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-12-2007
Afshin <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Hello everybody
>
>I have some years of experience with C++ and now need to learn java. I
>appreciate if you could advise me on how to get started. In the past,
>I used to work with Visual C++ 5.0 and 6.0 and have recently switched
>to Visual Studio 2005. I see there is a Visual J# available out there.
>Is it the right place to start?

If you are looking for a Java IDE then you may find my list of Java
IDEs at <http://ide.profectus.com.au> that are comparable to Visual
Studio useful.

The early versions of the standard Java text books seemed to me to be
aimed at programmers changing from C++ to Java. If you can find one
you may find it ideal. I found the constant comparison with a language
that I did not know intensely irritating so I may have exaggerated its
significance.
 
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Manivannan Palanichamy
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      06-12-2007
On Jun 12, 7:01 pm, David Segall <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Afshin <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >Hello everybody

>
> >I have some years of experience with C++ and now need to learn java. I
> >appreciate if you could advise me on how to get started. In the past,
> >I used to work with Visual C++ 5.0 and 6.0 and have recently switched
> >to Visual Studio 2005. I see there is a Visual J# available out there.
> >Is it the right place to start?

>
> If you are looking for a Java IDE then you may find my list of Java
> IDEs at <http://ide.profectus.com.au> that are comparable to Visual
> Studio useful.
>
> The early versions of the standard Java text books seemed to me to be
> aimed at programmers changing from C++ to Java. If you can find one
> you may find it ideal. I found the constant comparison with a language
> that I did not know intensely irritating so I may have exaggerated its
> significance.


When I was a kid, I missed to read 'The Java(TM) Programming Language'
- by James Gosling & Ken Arnold.
I will recommend you not to do the same mistake!

--
Manivannan.Palanichamy (@) Oracle.com
http://mani.gw.googlepages.com/index.html

 
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