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Tripods

 
 
Eric Miller
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-10-2007
Pudentame wrote:
> Peter A. Stavrakoglou wrote:
>
>>
>> You can get it even cheaper if you buy it from them on ebay.

>
>
> I could, but since I already have sturdier tripods from Manfrotto/Bogen
> and Gitzo, why would I?


How do you know that they are sturdier? Please relate your experience.

Eric Miller
www.dyesscreek.com
 
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Floyd L. Davidson
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-10-2007
Eric Miller <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>Pudentame wrote:
>> Peter A. Stavrakoglou wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> You can get it even cheaper if you buy it from them
>>> on ebay.

>> I could, but since I already have sturdier tripods
>> from Manfrotto/Bogen and Gitzo, why would I?

>
>How do you know that they are sturdier? Please relate your experience.


Play with a couple "Manfrotto/Bogen and Gitzo" tripods
for about 10 minutes each. You'll be convinced!

The hard part is selecting between various higher end
tripods in any given category.

The obvious breaking point is that Gitzo is reputed to
be worth the significant extra cost, but unless a person
uses a tripod every day it may be difficult to either
justify that initially or to later even verify the extra
value in use. (On the other hand, people who do use a
tripod every day virtually all extol the virtues of
Gitzo; hence, it is safe to assume the extra value is
there.)

For some it is *essential* to get the last bit of
performance out of a tripod, and the best Gitzo match is
what they do need. Just as obviously some people need
to get the last bit of performance out of their dollar
bills, and Gitzo tripods are not the best bang for the
buck if the tripod is rarely if ever stressed to its
limits.

For those who are truly serious though, this article
expresses a valid view

<http://www.bythom.com/support.htm>

It can be summed up in one quote:

"Thom's Maxim #2: You can spend US$1700 to buy a good
tripod and head, or you can spend US$1000 and do the
same thing. (Corollary: eventually you'll do one or
the other.)"

Thom Hogan does not recommend even the Manfrotto/Bogen
tripods, much less any of the lesser ones. Gitzo carbon
fiber is the only way. Kirk or Swiss Arca ballheads are
also the only way. From his point of view that is quite
correct.

--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)
 
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Eric Miller
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-11-2007
Floyd L. Davidson wrote:
> Eric Miller <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>Pudentame wrote:
>>
>>>Peter A. Stavrakoglou wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>You can get it even cheaper if you buy it from them
>>>>on ebay.
>>>
>>>I could, but since I already have sturdier tripods
>>>from Manfrotto/Bogen and Gitzo, why would I?

>>
>>How do you know that they are sturdier? Please relate your experience.

>
>
> Play with a couple "Manfrotto/Bogen and Gitzo" tripods
> for about 10 minutes each. You'll be convinced!
>
> The hard part is selecting between various higher end
> tripods in any given category.
>
> The obvious breaking point is that Gitzo is reputed to
> be worth the significant extra cost, but unless a person
> uses a tripod every day it may be difficult to either
> justify that initially or to later even verify the extra
> value in use. (On the other hand, people who do use a
> tripod every day virtually all extol the virtues of
> Gitzo; hence, it is safe to assume the extra value is
> there.)
>
> For some it is *essential* to get the last bit of
> performance out of a tripod, and the best Gitzo match is
> what they do need. Just as obviously some people need
> to get the last bit of performance out of their dollar
> bills, and Gitzo tripods are not the best bang for the
> buck if the tripod is rarely if ever stressed to its
> limits.
>
> For those who are truly serious though, this article
> expresses a valid view
>
> <http://www.bythom.com/support.htm>
>
> It can be summed up in one quote:
>
> "Thom's Maxim #2: You can spend US$1700 to buy a good
> tripod and head, or you can spend US$1000 and do the
> same thing. (Corollary: eventually you'll do one or
> the other.)"
>
> Thom Hogan does not recommend even the Manfrotto/Bogen
> tripods, much less any of the lesser ones. Gitzo carbon
> fiber is the only way. Kirk or Swiss Arca ballheads are
> also the only way. From his point of view that is quite
> correct.
>


Some interesting facts. I guess you missed my point that one who lacks a
basis for comparison cannot make a valid one. I now own two
Bogen/Manfrotto tripods and am very satisfied; I know they are good.
What I am wondering is the quality of the tripod linked to in my
original post. So I pose the question to you also, what is your
experience with it and how does it compare to the tripods you mentioned?

Eric Miller
www.dyesscreek.com
 
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Floyd L. Davidson
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-11-2007
Eric Miller <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>Floyd L. Davidson wrote:
>> Eric Miller <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>Pudentame wrote:
>>>>I could, but since I already have sturdier tripods
>>>>from Manfrotto/Bogen and Gitzo, why would I?
>>>
>>>How do you know that they are sturdier? Please relate your experience.

>>
>> Play with a couple "Manfrotto/Bogen and Gitzo" tripods
>> for about 10 minutes each. You'll be convinced!
>>
>> The hard part is selecting between various higher end
>> tripods in any given category.
>>
>> The obvious breaking point is that Gitzo is reputed to
>> be worth the significant extra cost, but unless a person
>> uses a tripod every day it may be difficult to either
>> justify that initially or to later even verify the extra
>> value in use. (On the other hand, people who do use a
>> tripod every day virtually all extol the virtues of
>> Gitzo; hence, it is safe to assume the extra value is
>> there.)
>>
>> For some it is *essential* to get the last bit of
>> performance out of a tripod, and the best Gitzo match is
>> what they do need. Just as obviously some people need
>> to get the last bit of performance out of their dollar
>> bills, and Gitzo tripods are not the best bang for the
>> buck if the tripod is rarely if ever stressed to its
>> limits.
>>
>> For those who are truly serious though, this article
>> expresses a valid view
>>
>> <http://www.bythom.com/support.htm>
>>
>> It can be summed up in one quote:
>>
>> "Thom's Maxim #2: You can spend US$1700 to buy a good
>> tripod and head, or you can spend US$1000 and do the
>> same thing. (Corollary: eventually you'll do one or
>> the other.)"
>>
>> Thom Hogan does not recommend even the Manfrotto/Bogen
>> tripods, much less any of the lesser ones. Gitzo carbon
>> fiber is the only way. Kirk or Swiss Arca ballheads are
>> also the only way. From his point of view that is quite
>> correct.

>
>Some interesting facts. I guess you missed my point that
>one who lacks a basis for comparison cannot make a valid
>one.


I didn't miss that at all. My point is that lacking
such basis, we can defer to those who can make valid
comparisons. Which is why I defer to people like Hogan.

>I now own two Bogen/Manfrotto tripods and am very
>satisfied; I know they are good.


"How do you know that they are sturdier? Please relate
your experience."

Have you ever used a Gitzo? Do you use a tripod
virtually every day, every week or once a month?

I'm suggesting that *I* do not have the experience to
make valid comparisons, and you have not indicated that
you do either. I also commented on the limits of
typical experience, and exactly where it ceases to be
effective. Which is why I posted a cite for something
by a person who does have the experience.

>What I am wondering is
>the quality of the tripod linked to in my original
>post. So I pose the question to you also, what is your
>experience with it and how does it compare to the
>tripods you mentioned?


I have no desire to spend $1700 to get $1000 worth of
tripod. Nor do I want to spend $17,000 to make sure
that Gitzo really is better than 30 or so other tripods.

The mechanism I chose to avoid that sort of expenditure
is to do research and find people who make comparisons
that I trust. I trust Thom Hogan's experience. It
lines up point for point with what experience I do have.
It also lines up with the experiences of others that I
trust.

If someone is a position to do simple testing of any
given tripod, and does *not* have the need to be
absolute positive they get the best... then perhaps
visiting a store that sells some given model will
provide sufficient opportunity. I doubt it, and it makes
no difference to me personally because I simply cannot
physically visit a store that sells any tripods!

As I noted, if one is not totally obsessed with getting
the most out of a tripod, then Manfrotto/Bogen is
certainly a good tripod for the dollar. If the best
tripod is essential, spend the money and get a Gitzo.

If a person wants to spend $1700 getting $1000 worth of
tripod, they should consider something cheaper to start
with. It's a wonderful learning experience, apparently.

--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) (E-Mail Removed)
 
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Mike Russell
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-11-2007
I've been looking for a lighter replacement for my trusty Bogen/Manfrotto,
which is about 7 pounds including head. It's rock solid, a little too heavy
to carry most of the time, but more importantly it has to be disassembled to
fit in my suitcase. There are so many choices it's ridiculous.

First, a couple of interesting links:

The Rosetta stone: a table of tripods and features:
http://www.wohlberg.net/public/photo/tripods.html

A review of the Velbon Carmagne 640, and a table comparing specs of similar
tripods
http://bayimages.net/tech/equipment/...magne-640.html

----------------------------------------------------
Here are some tripods I've evaluated, the number of stars indicate how much
I liked the tripod, regardless of price. I examined some of these at the
store, and relied on combing user discussions for the rest. Right now, my
favorite pick is the Slik Pro 614 CF, a reasonably light tripod that costs
300 US dollars legs only.

I'm mainly looking at four section carbon fiber tripods, max weight 3 lbs
w/o head, max length 24 inches, preferably 18 inches. In checking them out
I've stumbled across some interesting aluminum ones.

I did look at the lighter weight Gitzo tripods - 1500 series, and some of
the bogen tripods - beautifully built, but I was surprised at how relatively
flexible they were - nothing like my good old Bogen. After reading so many
rave reviews of Gitzos, frankly I expected something rock solid, and seeing
this kind of flexibility soured me on the price tag, and made me consider
other, less expensive tripods.

ULTRALUXISF Velbon Ultra LUXiSF Compact Tripod - unique, aluminum, and
inexpensive at under 100 dollars. The main advantage of this tripod is that
it folds incredibly small.

Bogen / Manfrotto 725B Digi Black Tripod with Ball head - this also comes in
a three axis head version. I was attracted by the low price (100 dollars),
but rejected it when I realized it rings for several seconds like a bell
when you tap it. The head is not removable, which is a bit limitation, and
I did not like the look of the plastic tab that locks the center column.
Still, it's so small and light, and reasonably sturdy even compared to the
lighter Gitzos.

(number of stars indicates my personal rating, and "S" indicates this is a
tripod I actually saw in the store, rather than relying on Internet chatter)
Gitzos with four stars are docked a star for costing 600 dollars, otherwise
I ignore price in making my ratings.

** (heavy)Velbon El Carmagne 640 Review - a great tripod, but turned out to
be much heavier than listed on the wohlberg site listed above

S** folded length too big, 3lb, Induro CX-113 Carbonflex 8X Tripod - again,
a good tripod, reasonably solid, good workmanship, and I was entranced by
the ability to angle the center column out for macro work. This tripod not
only has a level, but a compass too! The killer for me was that it was a
little on the heavy side, and the folded length was too long

** Gitzo G1058 Mountaineer Weekend 6X Carbon Fiber - beautiful, expensive,
and not very solid at all.

*** FEISOL CT-3441 - this is a tripod I would seriously consider. Its main
problem is that it is a little too heavy, and a little too big, compared
with the 3401 which is one of my favorites..

S*** FM Reviews - G1128 Mk2 Mountaineer Sport - a gorgeous Gitzo, somewhat
sturdier than the 1058, but it bends like a toy, IMHO.

S*** Gitzo G1258 Mountaineer Reporter 6X Carbon Fiber - beautiful, and
somewhat sturdier and heavier than the 1128 - it still twists easily, and
the particular tripod I looked at had one section of a leg that wobbled.

*** Gitzo GT-0931 Weekend Basalt Tripod Legs - somewhat less sturdy than the
1258, and still not cheap.

S*** SLIK compact pro - a tiny aluminum tripod, more of a tabletop tripod
really. It vibrates for quite a while if you tap it, and has a fixed head,
and it folds to an incredibly small size.

S**** SLIK Sprint Pro (<$100) I really liked this one - it's like the Bogen
/ Manfrotto 725B Digi, but the center column is secured better, and I liked
the overall feel.

**** Slik Pro 614 DX Carbon Fiber Tripod Kit - larger and heavier than my
favorite, the 614 CF, but not bad at all.

**** Gitzo GT2540L Mountaineer Long Reporter - I could easily live with this
tripod, but the price is very high as with all Gitzos, and the folded length
is too long.
S*** Gitzo GT-1540 Mountaineer 6X Carbon Fiber - another gorgeous, expensive
tripod.
**** Gitzo GT-1540T Traveler 6X Carbon Fiber - no problems here, other than
the price.

***** FEISOL 3401 - great price at 175 US dollars legs only, and great
online reviews. A little heavy at 2.9 lbs, and folds to 19 inches. It's
impossible to get them other than ordering them cold from Taiwan, and I'd
really like to see one before purchasing. This could still very well be my
next tripod.

***** SLIK Pro 614 CF - my current favorite, though I've never seen one.
The legs are 300 US dollars legs only, but the reviews from users are
stunning, and the weight and length are right where I need them - 18 inches
and 1.9 lbs.
--
Mike Russell - www.curvemeister.com






 
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Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-11-2007
Mike Russell wrote:
> I've been looking for a lighter replacement for my trusty Bogen/Manfrotto,
> which is about 7 pounds including head. It's rock solid, a little too heavy
> to carry most of the time, but more importantly it has to be disassembled to
> fit in my suitcase. There are so many choices it's ridiculous.
>
> First, a couple of interesting links:
>
> The Rosetta stone: a table of tripods and features:
> http://www.wohlberg.net/public/photo/tripods.html
>
> A review of the Velbon Carmagne 640, and a table comparing specs of similar
> tripods
> http://bayimages.net/tech/equipment/...magne-640.html
>
> ----------------------------------------------------
> Here are some tripods I've evaluated, the number of stars indicate how much
> I liked the tripod, regardless of price. I examined some of these at the
> store, and relied on combing user discussions for the rest. Right now, my
> favorite pick is the Slik Pro 614 CF, a reasonably light tripod that costs
> 300 US dollars legs only.
>
> I'm mainly looking at four section carbon fiber tripods, max weight 3 lbs
> w/o head, max length 24 inches, preferably 18 inches. In checking them out
> I've stumbled across some interesting aluminum ones.
>
> I did look at the lighter weight Gitzo tripods - 1500 series, and some of
> the bogen tripods - beautifully built, but I was surprised at how relatively
> flexible they were - nothing like my good old Bogen. After reading so many
> rave reviews of Gitzos, frankly I expected something rock solid, and seeing
> this kind of flexibility soured me on the price tag, and made me consider
> other, less expensive tripods.
>
> ULTRALUXISF Velbon Ultra LUXiSF Compact Tripod - unique, aluminum, and
> inexpensive at under 100 dollars. The main advantage of this tripod is that
> it folds incredibly small.
>
> Bogen / Manfrotto 725B Digi Black Tripod with Ball head - this also comes in
> a three axis head version. I was attracted by the low price (100 dollars),
> but rejected it when I realized it rings for several seconds like a bell
> when you tap it. The head is not removable, which is a bit limitation, and
> I did not like the look of the plastic tab that locks the center column.
> Still, it's so small and light, and reasonably sturdy even compared to the
> lighter Gitzos.
>
> (number of stars indicates my personal rating, and "S" indicates this is a
> tripod I actually saw in the store, rather than relying on Internet chatter)
> Gitzos with four stars are docked a star for costing 600 dollars, otherwise
> I ignore price in making my ratings.
>
> ** (heavy)Velbon El Carmagne 640 Review - a great tripod, but turned out to
> be much heavier than listed on the wohlberg site listed above
>
> S** folded length too big, 3lb, Induro CX-113 Carbonflex 8X Tripod - again,
> a good tripod, reasonably solid, good workmanship, and I was entranced by
> the ability to angle the center column out for macro work. This tripod not
> only has a level, but a compass too! The killer for me was that it was a
> little on the heavy side, and the folded length was too long
>
> ** Gitzo G1058 Mountaineer Weekend 6X Carbon Fiber - beautiful, expensive,
> and not very solid at all.
>
> *** FEISOL CT-3441 - this is a tripod I would seriously consider. Its main
> problem is that it is a little too heavy, and a little too big, compared
> with the 3401 which is one of my favorites..
>
> S*** FM Reviews - G1128 Mk2 Mountaineer Sport - a gorgeous Gitzo, somewhat
> sturdier than the 1058, but it bends like a toy, IMHO.
>
> S*** Gitzo G1258 Mountaineer Reporter 6X Carbon Fiber - beautiful, and
> somewhat sturdier and heavier than the 1128 - it still twists easily, and
> the particular tripod I looked at had one section of a leg that wobbled.
>
> *** Gitzo GT-0931 Weekend Basalt Tripod Legs - somewhat less sturdy than the
> 1258, and still not cheap.
>
> S*** SLIK compact pro - a tiny aluminum tripod, more of a tabletop tripod
> really. It vibrates for quite a while if you tap it, and has a fixed head,
> and it folds to an incredibly small size.
>
> S**** SLIK Sprint Pro (<$100) I really liked this one - it's like the Bogen
> / Manfrotto 725B Digi, but the center column is secured better, and I liked
> the overall feel.
>
> **** Slik Pro 614 DX Carbon Fiber Tripod Kit - larger and heavier than my
> favorite, the 614 CF, but not bad at all.
>
> **** Gitzo GT2540L Mountaineer Long Reporter - I could easily live with this
> tripod, but the price is very high as with all Gitzos, and the folded length
> is too long.
> S*** Gitzo GT-1540 Mountaineer 6X Carbon Fiber - another gorgeous, expensive
> tripod.
> **** Gitzo GT-1540T Traveler 6X Carbon Fiber - no problems here, other than
> the price.
>
> ***** FEISOL 3401 - great price at 175 US dollars legs only, and great
> online reviews. A little heavy at 2.9 lbs, and folds to 19 inches. It's
> impossible to get them other than ordering them cold from Taiwan, and I'd
> really like to see one before purchasing. This could still very well be my
> next tripod.
>
> ***** SLIK Pro 614 CF - my current favorite, though I've never seen one.
> The legs are 300 US dollars legs only, but the reviews from users are
> stunning, and the weight and length are right where I need them - 18 inches
> and 1.9 lbs.

Mike,
Nice list. I too was looking for a small lightweight travel tripod, but one that
also had good height and good stability. I didn't find exactly
what I wanted, but this one is close:

Manfrotto 190MF4 carbon fiber and I added a manfrotto 488 CR2 ball head.
It fits my requirements for height and reasonable stability.
It is a little heavier than I wanted (2.1 Kg, 4.6 pounds with ball head).
The center column unscrews into to pieces so the ball head and top of the
column are only 6 inches (15 cm) in length and the rest of the tripod
is 17.5 inches folded (44 cm). This fits into my lowepro computrekker backpack
(on the inside), so I can move around without the tripod being seen.
(I did this for the last 2+ weeks in Greece).

Roger
http://www.clarkvision.com
 
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Eric Miller
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-12-2007
Floyd L. Davidson wrote:

>
> Have you ever used a Gitzo? Do you use a tripod
> virtually every day, every week or once a month?
>


In a word, No.

Incidentally, I particularly chose this part of your post to respond to,
not because I didn't read the rest, but primarily because I started this
thread to inquire about a particular tripod that is *not* a Gitzo or a
Bogen or any other wellknown and reputable brand. I don't discount Mr.
Bienveniste's on-topic response, but it is a little frustrating when
responses to a question about an unknown commodity become a
recommendationfest for a known one. I do not doubt that many experienced
people justifiably choose another, much more expensive tripod.

This is only a mild gripe, mind you, because I have found yours and the
responses of others to be informative, if not necessarily informative
about the original topic.

As to the amount of use my tripod gets, I use it about once or twice a
year, and then every day, all day, for about seven or eight days. I am
very acquainted with my new Manfrotto 190QCCL tripod after a week of
fairly heavy use. I won't use it again for another few months, but then
I will need it bad enough to replace it if I lose another of those
*)$*$&@ quick release plates.

Eric Miller
www.dyesscreek.com
 
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Floyd L. Davidson
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-12-2007
Eric Miller <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>This is only a mild gripe, mind you, because I have
>found yours and the responses of others to be
>informative, if not necessarily informative about the
>original topic.


Heh heh. Usenet commonly works that way. We can ask
anything we want, but people still answer about whatever
they please.

And realistically, with technical topics it should be
assumed that the person asking doesn't necessarily know
the right question any more than they know the right
answer. Not so much in photography groups, but very
commonly in computer groups the first response has to be
"tell me what you want to do, rather than ask how well
some particular mechanism works". The one and only
mechanism the poster knows probably is not the right one
to use.

In this case, that might be true of tripods. We haven't
discussed all that much about what specific uses these
tripods are for.

>As to the amount of use my tripod gets, I use it about
>once or twice a year, and then every day, all day, for
>about seven or eight days. I am very acquainted with my
>new Manfrotto 190QCCL tripod after a week of fairly
>heavy use. I won't use it again for another few months,
>but then I will need it bad enough to replace it if I
>lose another of those *)$*$&@ quick release plates.


I would think that if you put in a solid week with it,
you will definitely have a feel for it! At least as far
as how functional it is. That still doesn't tell you
how likely various parts are to break, but given your
very light usage it doesn't make much difference.

--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) (E-Mail Removed)
 
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William Graham
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-12-2007

"Floyd L. Davidson" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Eric Miller <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>This is only a mild gripe, mind you, because I have
>>found yours and the responses of others to be
>>informative, if not necessarily informative about the
>>original topic.

>
> Heh heh. Usenet commonly works that way. We can ask
> anything we want, but people still answer about whatever
> they please.
>
> And realistically, with technical topics it should be
> assumed that the person asking doesn't necessarily know
> the right question any more than they know the right
> answer. Not so much in photography groups, but very
> commonly in computer groups the first response has to be
> "tell me what you want to do, rather than ask how well
> some particular mechanism works". The one and only
> mechanism the poster knows probably is not the right one
> to use.
>
> In this case, that might be true of tripods. We haven't
> discussed all that much about what specific uses these
> tripods are for.


This is true....My tripod, for example can weigh as much as it needs to
weigh in order to hold my camera steady....I never use it more than a few
feet from the trunk of my car, so spending a bunch of money for a carbon
fiber plastic fantastic would be a complete waste......


 
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Floyd L. Davidson
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-12-2007
"William Graham" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>"Floyd L. Davidson" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> And realistically, with technical topics it should be
>> assumed that the person asking doesn't necessarily know
>> the right question any more than they know the right
>> answer. Not so much in photography groups, but very
>> commonly in computer groups the first response has to be
>> "tell me what you want to do, rather than ask how well
>> some particular mechanism works". The one and only
>> mechanism the poster knows probably is not the right one
>> to use.
>>
>> In this case, that might be true of tripods. We haven't
>> discussed all that much about what specific uses these
>> tripods are for.

>
>This is true....My tripod, for example can weigh as much as it needs to
>weigh in order to hold my camera steady....I never use it more than a few
>feet from the trunk of my car, so spending a bunch of money for a carbon
>fiber plastic fantastic would be a complete waste......


That was where I used to be, and I'm not far from that
situation now. My physical mobility has declined
seriously in the past few years. I didn't mind an old
(18 pound) Majestic 2500 for almost everything, because
I didn't pack it farther than a couple hundred yards at
most. I just can't do that anymore, at all!

But I still want to use a tripod at things like school
functions. I have to carry everything more than 100
yards before I can sit down, so heavy don't get it. Now
I'm packing a Gitzo GT3530 that weighs 4 1/2 pounds
without the head.

I still use the Majestic tripod inside, except for
something where less vibration is really important (high
magnification photomacrography), and on occasion outside
for something special. I've got both the 8030A sidearm
and the 8040 side arm for the Majestic, so once in
awhile that versatility is really really useful and I'll
take it anywhere with about 20-30 feet of the truck.

It's all a balancing act to decide which tripod will do
best for any given thing. The Majestic is really heavy,
and it vibrates much more than carbon fiber does. But
with those sidearms it can end up looking like a
Christmas tree with camera and a couple flash units and
battery pack hung on it.

--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) (E-Mail Removed)
 
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