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What does the SRC in <IMG SRC> stand for?

 
 
Chris F.A. Johnson
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      06-04-2007
On 2007-06-03, dorayme wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
> "Chris F.A. Johnson" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> On 2007-06-01, rf wrote:
>> >
>> > How does "search" condense to "src"?

>>
>> In exactly the same way that "source" does: remove the 2nd, 3rd and
>> 6th letters.

>
> Indeed, that is what I have always assumed.


Of course, the reduction to 'src' can also be accomplished by the
more standard removal of vowels. With 'search', that leaves
'srch', which is the more common abbreviation.

--
Chris F.A. Johnson <http://cfaj.freeshell.org>
================================================== =================
Author:
Shell Scripting Recipes: A Problem-Solution Approach (2005, Apress)
 
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dorayme
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      06-04-2007
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
"Chris F.A. Johnson" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> On 2007-06-03, dorayme wrote:
> > In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
> > "Chris F.A. Johnson" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:


> Of course, the reduction to 'src' can also be accomplished by the
> more standard removal of vowels. With 'search', that leaves
> 'srch', which is the more common abbreviation.


Yes, src has seemed to many of us, I am sure, an abbreviation by
the usual method of vowel removal.

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dorayme
 
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Jukka K. Korpela
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      06-04-2007
Scripsit dorayme:

> Yes, src has seemed to many of us, I am sure, an abbreviation by
> the usual method of vowel removal.


Some people seem to have though of it as a misspelling of "scr", presumably
short for "screen". I've rather often seen the attribute name as "scr", and
although it could be just a typo (metathesis), I've wondered whether it has
some explanation.

Nevertheless, the SRC in <IMG SRC> stands for the attribute that indicates
the URL of the image. Nothing more, nothing less. We can discuss its
historic origin at any length, and the explanation as an abbreviation of
"source" is most probably correct, but it has no impact on the _meaning_ of
the attribute. Once you take a word or abbreviation from a natural language
and define it e.g. as an element name, attribute name, function name, or
whatever, it by definition loses connection with the natural language - it's
just a defined symbol, with no other meaning than the one you have given to
it.

This is particularly important when you consider names that were chosen
poorly, such as the element name "a" or the CSS property name
"letter-spacing" (which affects the spacing between all characters, not just
letters) or "white-space" (which also affects line breaking in strings
containing no white space).

--
Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/

 
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dorayme
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      06-04-2007
In article <XEO8i.173434$(E-Mail Removed) i>,
"Jukka K. Korpela" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Once you take a word or abbreviation from a natural language
> and define it e.g. as an element name, attribute name, function name, or
> whatever, it by definition loses connection with the natural language - it's
> just a defined symbol, with no other meaning than the one you have given to
> it.


Yes, indeed. I think there is a general phenomena under which
this comes. Many names, for instance, had their origins in words
that had natural meaning, connotations from occupations, places
of birth, and other things. It is rare to even think of these
"natural" meanings with proper names, they no longer "mean"
anything, their meaning is exhausted in acting as labels to refer
to individuals, their origins long forgotten.

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dorayme
 
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Dan
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      06-04-2007
On Jun 4, 2:52 am, "Jukka K. Korpela" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Scripsit dorayme:
>
> This is particularly important when you consider names that were chosen
> poorly, such as the element name "a" or the CSS property name
> "letter-spacing" (which affects the spacing between all characters, not just
> letters) or "white-space" (which also affects line breaking in strings
> containing no white space).


....and also affects spacing even when the background color is
something other than white. (There's no "grey-space" or "pink-space"
property, as far as I know.)

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Dan

 
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Dan
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      06-04-2007
On Jun 4, 5:03 am, dorayme <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Yes, indeed. I think there is a general phenomena under which
> this comes. Many names, for instance, had their origins in words
> that had natural meaning, connotations from occupations, places
> of birth, and other things. It is rare to even think of these
> "natural" meanings with proper names, they no longer "mean"
> anything, their meaning is exhausted in acting as labels to refer
> to individuals, their origins long forgotten.


And it's happened in the other direction too; lots of words derive
from proper names, like "boycott" (after somebody named Boycott who
was, er, boycotted) and "chauvanist" (I don't think I spelled that
right... Mozilla's spellchecker is underlining it... but then again,
Mozilla's spellchecker is underlining "spellchecker" too) is after
some French politician named "Chauvan" (which I may have misspelled
too). (I can't look anything up... Wikipedia is having server
problems! And of course I'm too lazy to get up and grab my
dictionary.)

--
Dan

 
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Neredbojias
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      06-06-2007
On Mon, 04 Jun 2007 12:57:19 GMT Dan scribed:

> On Jun 4, 5:03 am, dorayme <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Yes, indeed. I think there is a general phenomena under which
>> this comes. Many names, for instance, had their origins in words
>> that had natural meaning, connotations from occupations, places
>> of birth, and other things. It is rare to even think of these
>> "natural" meanings with proper names, they no longer "mean"
>> anything, their meaning is exhausted in acting as labels to refer
>> to individuals, their origins long forgotten.

>
> And it's happened in the other direction too; lots of words derive
> from proper names, like "boycott" (after somebody named Boycott who
> was, er, boycotted) and "chauvanist" (I don't think I spelled that
> right... Mozilla's spellchecker is underlining it... but then again,
> Mozilla's spellchecker is underlining "spellchecker" too) is after
> some French politician named "Chauvan" (which I may have misspelled
> too). (I can't look anything up... Wikipedia is having server
> problems! And of course I'm too lazy to get up and grab my
> dictionary.)


And don't forget "Balzac" who relieved us of the need for goin' 'round
saying "scrotum" all the time...

--
Neredbojias
He who laughs last sounds like an idiot.
 
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