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Setting up a home IVR

 
 
John McKenzie
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      05-16-2007

Greetings, all.

I am completely new to anything VoIP, other than client usage, so I come
here seeking guidiance.

If I can, I would like like to connect my home's PSTN line to my computer
and have my computer act as a voicemail system that reacts to call ID info.

What I envision is plugging a phone cable into the phone jack of my wall
and some piece of hardware that is connected to my computer (pressumably
by ethernet, USB, PCI slot, etc) and having the computer see the phone
numbers of incomming callers and acting on them. For example, if the
computer sees one number, it does nothing, if it sees another it plays a
recording asking the caller to leave a voicemail. Actually recording the
voicemail is good, but not absolutely neccessary.

My research seems to indicate that the software part of this is possible.
I will eventually find something to put on my linux box for this purpose,
however, I am unfamilair with the hardware involved. I would appreciate
it if someone could advise if my goals described above are achievable,
and what type of hardware would I need for this.

I am unclear on what will do the job, but I know a little bit about what
is out there.

Would something like this item be helpfull in my above stated goals?

Grandstream HandyTone 488 Analog Telephone Adaptor
http://www.grandstream.com/ht488.html


It is relatively cheap, as such hardware goes right now, so I was hoping
I could just buy it, or something comparable, plug it it and run something
like Callweaver, YATE, SipX, etc to do what I desire.


Thanks
 
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Balwinder S \bsd\ Dheeman
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      05-16-2007
On 05/16/2007 12:27 PM, John McKenzie wrote:
> Greetings, all.
>
> I am completely new to anything VoIP, other than client usage, so I come
> here seeking guidiance.
>
> If I can, I would like like to connect my home's PSTN line to my computer
> and have my computer act as a voicemail system that reacts to call ID info.
>
> What I envision is plugging a phone cable into the phone jack of my wall
> and some piece of hardware that is connected to my computer (pressumably
> by ethernet, USB, PCI slot, etc) and having the computer see the phone
> numbers of incomming callers and acting on them. For example, if the
> computer sees one number, it does nothing, if it sees another it plays a
> recording asking the caller to leave a voicemail. Actually recording the
> voicemail is good, but not absolutely neccessary.
>
> My research seems to indicate that the software part of this is possible.
> I will eventually find something to put on my linux box for this purpose,
> however, I am unfamilair with the hardware involved. I would appreciate
> it if someone could advise if my goals described above are achievable,
> and what type of hardware would I need for this.
>
> I am unclear on what will do the job, but I know a little bit about what
> is out there.
>
> Would something like this item be helpfull in my above stated goals?
>
> Grandstream HandyTone 488 Analog Telephone Adaptor
> http://www.grandstream.com/ht488.html
>
> It is relatively cheap, as such hardware goes right now, so I was hoping
> I could just buy it, or something comparable, plug it it and run something
> like Callweaver, YATE, SipX, etc to do what I desire.


IMHO, the Asterisk running on a Linux machine is a best option to meet
all your current and, or future needs and, or requirements. Instead of
an ATA (Analog Telephone Adapter), try finding a suitable card with one
FXS and one FXO ports.

--
Dr Balwinder S "bsd" Dheeman Registered Linux User: #229709
Anu'z Linux@HOME Machines: #168573, 170593, 259192
Chandigarh, UT, 160062, India Gentoo, Fedora, Debian/FreeBSD/XP
Home: http://cto.homelinux.net/~bsd/ Visit: http://counter.li.org/
 
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LVMarc
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-17-2007
John McKenzie wrote:
> Greetings, all.
>
> I am completely new to anything VoIP, other than client usage, so I come
> here seeking guidiance.
>
> If I can, I would like like to connect my home's PSTN line to my computer
> and have my computer act as a voicemail system that reacts to call ID info.
>
> What I envision is plugging a phone cable into the phone jack of my wall
> and some piece of hardware that is connected to my computer (pressumably
> by ethernet, USB, PCI slot, etc) and having the computer see the phone
> numbers of incomming callers and acting on them. For example, if the
> computer sees one number, it does nothing, if it sees another it plays a
> recording asking the caller to leave a voicemail. Actually recording the
> voicemail is good, but not absolutely neccessary.
>
> My research seems to indicate that the software part of this is possible.
> I will eventually find something to put on my linux box for this purpose,
> however, I am unfamilair with the hardware involved. I would appreciate
> it if someone could advise if my goals described above are achievable,
> and what type of hardware would I need for this.
>
> I am unclear on what will do the job, but I know a little bit about what
> is out there.
>
> Would something like this item be helpfull in my above stated goals?
>
> Grandstream HandyTone 488 Analog Telephone Adaptor
> http://www.grandstream.com/ht488.html
>
>
> It is relatively cheap, as such hardware goes right now, so I was hoping
> I could just buy it, or something comparable, plug it it and run something
> like Callweaver, YATE, SipX, etc to do what I desire.
>
>
> Thanks

you can connect your pstn and voip using combine-a-line.

and it does not need a usb port and coptuer to operate savings 100's
dollars in wasted energy use.

here is a link to combine a line

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...&rd=1&rd=1voip
pstn zero enrgy use adapter avoid usb adapters
 
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John McKenzie
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-18-2007

Balwinder:

Thank you for your response.

Could you please elaborate a little on why you suggested a card with
FXS/FXO ports instead of an ATA (Analog Telephone Adapter)? I am unclear
if you suggested because it would just be better overall, or because it is
the only option to make my plan work. (That is to say would an ATA not do
the things I require?)

I was looking at that Grandstream ATA because it was cheap, and I do not
not need a sophesticated PBX set-up or the like. I just want my computer
to identify an incomming number and either ignore it (and therefore let
the other phones in the house ring), or send it to voicemail (VM). VM
would be provided by the computer.

Is the Grandstream device not capable of this? Due to your recommendation
I will consider spending the extra money on a card, but I would like to
understand the situiation before I do.

LVMarc:

Thank you for responding as well. I am still not sure what that
Combine-A-Line thing does or if I need addiational hardware with it.
(Such as a modem?) Every reference I could find it to was a copy and paste
of the sames sales pitch, which is somewhat off-puting.

 
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Balwinder S \bsd\ Dheeman
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-18-2007
On 05/18/2007 11:03 AM, John McKenzie wrote:
> Balwinder:
>
> Thank you for your response.


You're welocme!

> Could you please elaborate a little on why you suggested a card with
> FXS/FXO ports instead of an ATA (Analog Telephone Adapter)? I am unclear
> if you suggested because it would just be better overall, or because it is
> the only option to make my plan work. (That is to say would an ATA not do
> the things I require?)


Just, because you already want to deploy a full fledged machine for
handling voicemail only, whereas IMHO, almost all the features that
Gradstream ATA has provides are already available on a linux machine,
except for the FXO and FXS ports.

> I was looking at that Grandstream ATA because it was cheap, and I do not
> not need a sophesticated PBX set-up or the like. I just want my computer
> to identify an incomming number and either ignore it (and therefore let
> the other phones in the house ring), or send it to voicemail (VM). VM
> would be provided by the computer.


I have not used Grandstream ATA, but I think, it definitely could be an
embedded Linux gadget somehow; it might also be using Asterisk for
handling VoIP and, or PSTN calls. BTW, better you read it's manuals and,
or wait for other people's responses and, or recommendations who have
used it.

> Is the Grandstream device not capable of this? Due to your recommendation
> I will consider spending the extra money on a card, but I would like to
> understand the situiation before I do.


I'm not sure that the said and, or any other ATA is capable of sending
requisite CLI information to a computer, that's why I suggested you to
buy a card having a minimum of 1 FXO and 1 FXS ports for your machine.

--
Dr Balwinder S "bsd" Dheeman Registered Linux User: #229709
Anu'z Linux@HOME Machines: #168573, 170593, 259192
Chandigarh, UT, 160062, India Gentoo, Fedora, Debian/FreeBSD/XP
Home: http://cto.homelinux.net/~bsd/ Visit: http://counter.li.org/
 
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Hongtian
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-22-2007
On May 16, 2:57 pm, John McKenzie <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Greetings, all.
>
> I am completely new to anything VoIP, other than client usage, so I come
> here seeking guidiance.
>
> If I can, I would like like to connect my home's PSTN line to my computer
> and have my computer act as a voicemail system that reacts to call ID info.
>
> What I envision is plugging a phone cable into the phone jack of my wall
> and some piece of hardware that is connected to my computer (pressumably
> by ethernet, USB, PCI slot, etc) and having the computer see the phone
> numbers of incomming callers and acting on them. For example, if the
> computer sees one number, it does nothing, if it sees another it plays a
> recording asking the caller to leave a voicemail. Actually recording the
> voicemail is good, but not absolutely neccessary.
>
> My research seems to indicate that the software part of this is possible.
> I will eventually find something to put on my linux box for this purpose,
> however, I am unfamilair with the hardware involved. I would appreciate
> it if someone could advise if my goals described above are achievable,
> and what type of hardware would I need for this.
>
> I am unclear on what will do the job, but I know a little bit about what
> is out there.
>
> Would something like this item be helpfull in my above stated goals?
>
> Grandstream HandyTone 488 Analog Telephone Adaptor
> http://www.grandstream.com/ht488.html
>
> It is relatively cheap, as such hardware goes right now, so I was hoping
> I could just buy it, or something comparable, plug it it and run something
> like Callweaver, YATE, SipX, etc to do what I desire.
>
> Thanks


I suggest you to try miniSipServer. It is a SIP server for windows and
very easy to use.

MSS can support powerful dialing plan, so I believe it is very easy to
check call with caller ID for MSS.

But MSS cannot support VoiceMail in current versin.

B.R.
Hongtian

 
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Hongtian
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-22-2007
On May 16, 2:57 pm, John McKenzie <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Greetings, all.
>
> I am completely new to anything VoIP, other than client usage, so I come
> here seeking guidiance.
>
> If I can, I would like like to connect my home's PSTN line to my computer
> and have my computer act as a voicemail system that reacts to call ID info.
>
> What I envision is plugging a phone cable into the phone jack of my wall
> and some piece of hardware that is connected to my computer (pressumably
> by ethernet, USB, PCI slot, etc) and having the computer see the phone
> numbers of incomming callers and acting on them. For example, if the
> computer sees one number, it does nothing, if it sees another it plays a
> recording asking the caller to leave a voicemail. Actually recording the
> voicemail is good, but not absolutely neccessary.
>
> My research seems to indicate that the software part of this is possible.
> I will eventually find something to put on my linux box for this purpose,
> however, I am unfamilair with the hardware involved. I would appreciate
> it if someone could advise if my goals described above are achievable,
> and what type of hardware would I need for this.
>
> I am unclear on what will do the job, but I know a little bit about what
> is out there.
>
> Would something like this item be helpfull in my above stated goals?
>
> Grandstream HandyTone 488 Analog Telephone Adaptor
> http://www.grandstream.com/ht488.html
>
> It is relatively cheap, as such hardware goes right now, so I was hoping
> I could just buy it, or something comparable, plug it it and run something
> like Callweaver, YATE, SipX, etc to do what I desire.
>
> Thanks


I suggest you to try miniSipServer. It is a SIP server for windows and
very easy to use.

MSS can support powerful dialing plan, so I believe it is very easy to
check call with caller ID for MSS.

But MSS cannot support VoiceMail in current versin.

B.R.
Hongtian

 
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John McKenzie
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-28-2007

Balwinder:

Thanks for the follow-up reply. I am still unclear on what a good course
of action would be as my reasons for looking at the Grandstream device
were the exact same as your reasons for me not to use it. I was hoping I
could ask some clarifiying questions of you and everyone else reading this.

As I have a machine I intend to run as a Linux based phone system thing I
figured I just need something that will allow the computer to control a
phone line. A voice modem without the modem part. I know that a fancy
PCI card with a FXO and a FXS port could do what I need, but it is more
expensive than the Grandtsream device and I do not require an impressive
production system in a critical environment. The Grandstream device may do
less, but it should be enough and is cheaper. Quality can come latter when
the situiation is not as experimental as it is now.

If the Grandstream device cannot allow my computer to accept and/or
place phone calls over the PSTN, what are devices like it used for?

To further my VoIP education could you please tell me what the
CLI in the "requisite CLI information" comment you made stands for and a
little bit about the concept?

(Perhaps one of my problems is that I do not understand the limits of an
Analogue Telephone Adaptor.)

I appreciate your help and certainly look forward to learning more about
the wacky world of VoIP from you and everyone else willing to teach me.

B.R.:

Thanks for replying to my post as well. I already have a number of
software options to look at and now I have one more, although a linux one
is preferred. Still, I am going out to look up info on MiniSIPerver right
now. My immeadiate problem is learning what hardware will be required for
me to do what I intend.

 
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John McKenzie
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-28-2007

Did a little more reading...

CLI is the same as ANI? If the Grandstream device can't read that, no
caller ID for me. I understand a little more now if this is true.

 
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Wolfgang S. Rupprecht
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      05-28-2007

John McKenzie <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> If I can, I would like like to connect my home's PSTN line to my computer
> and have my computer act as a voicemail system that reacts to call ID info.


That's what I do. (Asterisk, Sipura-3000, Grandstream bt-100 phones.)

> Grandstream HandyTone 488 Analog Telephone Adaptor
> http://www.grandstream.com/ht488.html


That looks to be much the same as the Sipura 3k I have. It should
work.

Note, learning the weird Asterisk regexp language will remind you of
learning Sendmail's "cf" language. Programming in it will make your
head hurt. Expect it not to make any sense for a week or two and then
it will click. The other sip servers you mentioned might be better.
I have no experience with them so can't say for sure.

> It is relatively cheap, as such hardware goes right now, so I was hoping
> I could just buy it, or something comparable, plug it it and run something
> like Callweaver, YATE, SipX, etc to do what I desire.


The one thing that you probably won't be able to do is talk over he
POTS line using this device. 2-wire POTS lines have much too much
echo. (Without VOIP's added delay your ear will take out echo all on
it's own, so you aren't bothered by it. Once you add a hundred
milliseconds or two VOIP delay your ear won't filter it any more and
the result is hearing yourself talk just delayed enough to make it
impossible to continue.) This is why I ended up using my Sipura 3k as
an IVR-based answering machine only.

-wolfgang
--
Wolfgang S. Rupprecht http://www.wsrcc.com/wolfgang/
Hints for IPv6 on FC6 http://www.wsrcc.com/wolfgang/fedora/ipv6-tunnel.html
 
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