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Do most of Fortune 500 companies use OOP with ASP.Net 2.0?

 
 
Randy Smith
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      05-01-2007
Hi ALL,
I was told that most Fortune 500 companies use OOP in conjunction with
ASP.Net 2.0. Personally, I find this hard to believe, unless the class
libraries being created are going to be used over and over. But what about
instances where the web application is designed to be stand-alone. Isn't
this a waste of effort to create classes, datamappers, etc.??? IMHO, OOP
adds about 50% on to the development time for any given project, with no
obvious payback in increased productivity.

Can someone please set me straight on this?

TIA, Randy Smith


 
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bruce barker
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      05-01-2007
asking what fortune 500 do is meanless. they are so large they use very
tool and technology well and badly.

a better question is what do skilled .net developers do. as .net is
designed for implementing OOA/OOP applications, thats what they do.
there is no reason for OOP design to be slower and combined with test
first leads to quicker and more stable projects.

of course any technology you do not understand or are not proficient at
will take longer. That does no mean its bad. while UI applications are
generally easier with OOP, if your apps are procedural, or you are
mostly using declarative (another new trend) then no need to switch.


-- bruce (sqlwork.com)

Randy Smith wrote:
> Hi ALL,
> I was told that most Fortune 500 companies use OOP in conjunction with
> ASP.Net 2.0. Personally, I find this hard to believe, unless the class
> libraries being created are going to be used over and over. But what about
> instances where the web application is designed to be stand-alone. Isn't
> this a waste of effort to create classes, datamappers, etc.??? IMHO, OOP
> adds about 50% on to the development time for any given project, with no
> obvious payback in increased productivity.
>
> Can someone please set me straight on this?
>
> TIA, Randy Smith
>
>

 
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=?Utf-8?B?UGV0ZXIgQnJvbWJlcmcgW0MjIE1WUF0=?=
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      05-01-2007
Most large organizations that are well-managed from an IT perspective employ
customized OOP -oriented frameworks for both web and non-web based
applications. Once you have a well-designed framework built and tested, you
can SUBTRACT that "50%" of the time it takes to build a new app.
Peter

--
Site: http://www.eggheadcafe.com
UnBlog: http://petesbloggerama.blogspot.com
Short urls & more: http://ittyurl.net




"Randy Smith" wrote:

> Hi ALL,
> I was told that most Fortune 500 companies use OOP in conjunction with
> ASP.Net 2.0. Personally, I find this hard to believe, unless the class
> libraries being created are going to be used over and over. But what about
> instances where the web application is designed to be stand-alone. Isn't
> this a waste of effort to create classes, datamappers, etc.??? IMHO, OOP
> adds about 50% on to the development time for any given project, with no
> obvious payback in increased productivity.
>
> Can someone please set me straight on this?
>
> TIA, Randy Smith
>
>
>

 
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George Ter-Saakov
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      05-01-2007
You are almost right that OOP adds 50% on development time.

Almost because OOP reduces maintenance time by (probably) 90%. And on any
relatively big project development time is negligent comparing to
maintenance time. Users always want to add features, fix bugs, .....
All numbers come from my experience. I had written internet store
mspiercing.com 2 years ago (took about 2 month). Still improving/rewriting
some of it. Of course it's on and off but now I wish that I did some code
right instead of cutting corners.

And with big companies where there are more than one person works on a
project maintainability is a live and death.


George.


"Randy Smith" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hi ALL,
> I was told that most Fortune 500 companies use OOP in conjunction with
> ASP.Net 2.0. Personally, I find this hard to believe, unless the class
> libraries being created are going to be used over and over. But what
> about instances where the web application is designed to be stand-alone.
> Isn't this a waste of effort to create classes, datamappers, etc.???
> IMHO, OOP adds about 50% on to the development time for any given project,
> with no obvious payback in increased productivity.
>
> Can someone please set me straight on this?
>
> TIA, Randy Smith
>



 
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darrel
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      05-01-2007
> I was told that most Fortune 500 companies use OOP in conjunction with
> ASP.Net 2.0. Personally, I find this hard to believe, unless the class
> libraries being created are going to be used over and over. But what
> about instances where the web application is designed to be stand-alone.
> Isn't this a waste of effort to create classes, datamappers, etc.???
> IMHO, OOP adds about 50% on to the development time for any given project,
> with no obvious payback in increased productivity.
>
> Can someone please set me straight on this?


I likely can't set you straight. But can offer random opinions... ;o)

I think OOP and .net are great when you need to create large enterprise web
applications.

However for general web sites, I think OOP and .net is often overkill. There
*is* a reason that PHP and the like are so popular for web work. Sometimes
the old ASP-scripting method is the right solution for a project.

George brings up maintenance, which I agree with. However, a lot of web site
projects are rewritten every several years anyways, so long-term maintenance
may not be as big of an issue.

_Darrel


 
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sloan
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      05-01-2007

The cost of software is in MAINTENANCE, not development.

Internal Frameworks, developed correctly and over time begin to save your
company alot of time/money.

OO isn't just

class Bird : IAnimal

There are design patterns used to create a common methodology, and most of
these have maintenance in mind.

The more/better thought you put into an application at the start, even
stand-alone ones, the more it pays off later.

Its NEVER a waste of time to develop good code from the get go. The moment
you gotta go in and tweak something, all that upfront work pays off.

This is why I can't (or choose not to) work for most outsource companies.
The ones I've interviewed with seem more interested in RAPID development,
not good development.
I speak only from the direct experience I've had.

Google "software maintenance costs" and see what you come up with, and how
much of the overall pie it costs.


I would take a look at this book:
http://www.apress.com/book/bookDisplay.html?bID=279

It does a good job of mapping out what Framework pieces are, esp
The Domain-Specific Framework Layer vs

Cross-Domain Framework Layer

framework pieces.



...








"Randy Smith" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hi ALL,
> I was told that most Fortune 500 companies use OOP in conjunction with
> ASP.Net 2.0. Personally, I find this hard to believe, unless the class
> libraries being created are going to be used over and over. But what

about
> instances where the web application is designed to be stand-alone. Isn't
> this a waste of effort to create classes, datamappers, etc.??? IMHO, OOP
> adds about 50% on to the development time for any given project, with no
> obvious payback in increased productivity.
>
> Can someone please set me straight on this?
>
> TIA, Randy Smith
>
>



 
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darrel
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      05-01-2007

> This is why I can't (or choose not to) work for most outsource companies.
> The ones I've interviewed with seem more interested in RAPID development,
> not good development.


In an ideal world (IMHO) most projects would be developed/designed rapidly
and then rewritten properly for release.

-Darrel


 
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