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C++ in Linux or Windows

 
 
Johs
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      04-17-2007
Are there any difference between writting C++ in linux or Windows?

I was told that it was only a matter of available IDE's (eclipse for both
platforms, but only Visual Studio for Windows) but are there other
techincal/syntatical/standard library function differences?

Johs


 
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Obnoxious User
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      04-17-2007
Johs skrev:
> Are there any difference between writting C++ in linux or Windows?
>
> I was told that it was only a matter of available IDE's (eclipse for both
> platforms, but only Visual Studio for Windows) but are there other
> techincal/syntatical/standard library function differences?
>


You'll encounter the difference when you need platform specific api. As
long as you dwell inside the c++ standard sandbox, you're safe, although
there are libraries that extend the boundaries of that sandbox to ease
cross-platform development.

--
OU
 
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Lionel B
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      04-17-2007
On Tue, 17 Apr 2007 16:17:31 +0200, Johs wrote:

> Are there any difference between writting C++ in linux or Windows?
>
> I was told that it was only a matter of available IDE's (eclipse for
> both platforms, but only Visual Studio for Windows) but are there other
> techincal/syntatical/standard library function differences?


Well, in theory there should be no difference in terms of syntax and
standard library functionality. Some things to bear in mind, though:

1) The language specification generally does not mandate *implementation*
of language/library features beyond required functionality, so that
different compilers - possibly on the same platform - may well implement
features differently (this may, for example, manifest itself in time/
memory usage of some function). Also, there are very many instances of
potential "undefined behaviour" in the language spec; if you hit one of
these all bets are off and you can't expect similar results across
platforms/compilers.

2) Compilers may provide non-standard extensions to the language and
standard library (hopefully they will also provide a means of "turning
off" non-standard features and enforcing strict language/standard library
compliance).

3) There are likely to be wildly disparate assortments of OS-specific
libraries available for various platforms, particularly in areas where
the C++ standard does not provide functionality (eg. GUIs, threading,
inter-process communication, networking, etc.). Some of these libraries
may (attempt to) be cross-platform, others not.

If you stick to strict language standards compliance and avoid non-
portable libraries then, you should encounter no significant differences
in the language across platforms; of course this may not be possible,
depending on what you are trying to program.

IDEs are a matter of (in)convenience - you may not need/want to use one
(I don't).

--
Lionel B
 
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dave_mikesell@fastmail.fm
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      04-17-2007
On Apr 17, 10:47 am, Lionel B <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> IDEs are a matter of (in)convenience - you may not need/want to use one
> (I don't).


Heh - thought I was the only one. Gvim and make for me...

 
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Zeppe
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      04-17-2007
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) wrote:

>> IDEs are a matter of (in)convenience - you may not need/want to use one
>> (I don't).

>
> Heh - thought I was the only one. Gvim and make for me...
>


it's just for the 99.99% of the common human beings (I'm among them)
that a good IDE like Visual Studio improves the productivity by 300%...

Regards,

Zeppe

 
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Victor Bazarov
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      04-17-2007
Zeppe wrote:
> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>
>>> IDEs are a matter of (in)convenience - you may not need/want to use
>>> one (I don't).

>>
>> Heh - thought I was the only one. Gvim and make for me...
>>

>
> it's just for the 99.99% of the common human beings (I'm among them)
> that a good IDE like Visual Studio improves the productivity by
> 300%...


.... yeah, and now you will also tell us that a debugger is useful,
right? Pff! All my code runs the first time around -- I don't need
no stinking debuggers! <g>


 
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Howard
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      04-17-2007

"Victor Bazarov" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:f02rrd$ecf$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Zeppe wrote:
>> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>>
>>>> IDEs are a matter of (in)convenience - you may not need/want to use
>>>> one (I don't).
>>>
>>> Heh - thought I was the only one. Gvim and make for me...
>>>

>>
>> it's just for the 99.99% of the common human beings (I'm among them)
>> that a good IDE like Visual Studio improves the productivity by
>> 300%...

>
> ... yeah, and now you will also tell us that a debugger is useful,
> right? Pff! All my code runs the first time around -- I don't need
> no stinking debuggers! <g>


Personally, I prefer Zen Programming. No need for compilers, or even code
editors. The program simply is.

-Howard



 
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Victor Bazarov
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      04-17-2007
Howard wrote:
> "Victor Bazarov" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:f02rrd$ecf$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Zeppe wrote:
>>> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>>>
>>>>> IDEs are a matter of (in)convenience - you may not need/want to
>>>>> use one (I don't).
>>>>
>>>> Heh - thought I was the only one. Gvim and make for me...
>>>>
>>>
>>> it's just for the 99.99% of the common human beings (I'm among them)
>>> that a good IDE like Visual Studio improves the productivity by
>>> 300%...

>>
>> ... yeah, and now you will also tell us that a debugger is useful,
>> right? Pff! All my code runs the first time around -- I don't need
>> no stinking debuggers! <g>

>
> Personally, I prefer Zen Programming. No need for compilers, or even
> code editors. The program simply is.


IIUIC, when you practice Zen Programming, there *is* no program. Only
your awareness of it exists.


 
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James Kanze
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      04-18-2007
On Apr 17, 6:02 pm, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> On Apr 17, 10:47 am, Lionel B <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:


> > IDEs are a matter of (in)convenience - you may not need/want to use one
> > (I don't).


> Heh - thought I was the only one. Gvim and make for me...


I don't think any professional programmer uses one in his
professional work. At least, I've never met one who did (and as
a consultant, I see a lot of different workplaces). Judging
from what little I've seen of them, they generally don't offer
the functionality you need for a professional environment.

That doesn't mean that they're without use. I would hardly like
to tell a beginning programmer that before compiling his first
program, he has to learn make. And depending on the
environment, they may be useful for various types of
experimenting (although most of the people I know have set up
their environment so that they can experiment quite easily
without one).

--
James Kanze (GABI Software) email:(E-Mail Removed)
Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34

 
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James Kanze
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      04-18-2007
On Apr 17, 6:06 pm, Zeppe
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> >> IDEs are a matter of (in)convenience - you may not need/want to use one
> >> (I don't).


> > Heh - thought I was the only one. Gvim and make for me...


> it's just for the 99.99% of the common human beings (I'm among them)
> that a good IDE like Visual Studio improves the productivity by 300%...


Does it really? Then why isn't it used by the most productive
programmers?

An IDE has the advantage of being easy to learn. Typically, the
easier something is to learn, the less powerful it is, and the
less productive you are once you have invested the effort to
learn it. Without any previous knowledge, I'm sure that you can
write and compile a program quicker with Visual Studios than
with gvim/shell/makefiles, etc. Once you have learned the
classical toolset, however, I suspect the reverse is true; at
least, I've never seen anyone really effective with Visual
Studios (or with any other IDE).

--
James Kanze (GABI Software) email:(E-Mail Removed)
Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34

 
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