Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Computer Support > Electric Question

Reply
Thread Tools

Electric Question

 
 
Jimbob
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2007
I've heard this mentioned a few times but need clarification. Does my PC
use more electric when turning it on and off a few times a day, or do
they use less when leaving them on all day?

My g/f is kicking up a stink and need evidence!

TIA
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Gordon
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2007
Jimbob wrote:

> I've heard this mentioned a few times but need clarification. Does my PC
> use more electric when turning it on and off a few times a day, or do
> they use less when leaving them on all day?
>
> My g/f is kicking up a stink and need evidence!
>
> TIA


It doesn't use ANY "electric" - it uses electriCITY
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Desk Rabbit
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2007
Jimbob wrote:
> I've heard this mentioned a few times but need clarification. Does my PC
> use more electric when turning it on and off a few times a day, or do
> they use less when leaving them on all day?
>
> My g/f is kicking up a stink and need evidence!
>
> TIA

When its turned off at the mains it uses no electricity. In standby it
will use less than when it is turned on.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Blinky the Shark
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2007
Jimbob wrote:

> I've heard this mentioned a few times but need clarification.
> Does my PC use more electric when turning it on and off a few
> times a day, or do they use less when leaving them on all day?
>
> My g/f is kicking up a stink and need evidence!


The issue is not just use of electricity. The other issue is what's
best for your system. That's a holy wars topic. Some feel that
it's better to leave it on because it reduces the number of power-up
surges the hardware sees. When do your light bulbs usually blow --
when you turn them on or when they've been on for a while? Others
maintain that that's not an issue, and you should turn your system
off if you're not going to be using it for a while. The lengthof "a
while" is left for the individual to decide -- there's no formula
for it.


--
Blinky
Killfiling all posts from Google Groups
Details: http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
 
Reply With Quote
 
Stickems.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2007
Turning the PC on and off, no matter how many times within reason, uses less
electricity.

"Jimbob" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
| I've heard this mentioned a few times but need clarification. Does my PC
| use more electric when turning it on and off a few times a day, or do
| they use less when leaving them on all day?
|
| My g/f is kicking up a stink and need evidence!
|
| TIA


 
Reply With Quote
 
The Old Sourdough
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2007
On 2007-04-12, in 24hoursupport.helpdesk, Gordon waxed eloquently:
> Jimbob wrote:
>
>> I've heard this mentioned a few times but need clarification. Does my PC
>> use more electric when turning it on and off a few times a day, or do
>> they use less when leaving them on all day?
>>
>> My g/f is kicking up a stink and need evidence!
>>
>> TIA

>
> It doesn't use ANY "electric" - it uses electriCITY


One of my favorites: "Does it run on batteries or electricity?"

--
The Old Sourdough
Preserve Wildlife! Throw a party today!
 
Reply With Quote
 
ellis_jay
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2007
Jimbob wrote:
> I've heard this mentioned a few times but need clarification. Does my
> PC use more electric when turning it on and off a few times a day, or
> do they use less when leaving them on all day?
>
> My g/f is kicking up a stink and need evidence!
>
> TIA


Like the other poster says: SUrge verses steady-state. Although
"steady-state" is not quite exact as the voltage will cycle between 110 to
120+ . If you are talking about global warming and conservation of
energy-disconnect the power and Miami will have left a little more time to
breathe easier above water.

--
When people are engaged in something they are not proud of, they do
not welcome witnesses. In fact, they come to believe the witness causes
the trouble. ___John Steinbeck

Ellis_Jay


 
Reply With Quote
 
WhzzKdd
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2007
"ellis_jay" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed). ..
> Jimbob wrote:
>> I've heard this mentioned a few times but need clarification. Does my
>> PC use more electric when turning it on and off a few times a day, or
>> do they use less when leaving them on all day?
>>
>> My g/f is kicking up a stink and need evidence!
>>
>> TIA

>
> Like the other poster says: SUrge verses steady-state. Although
> "steady-state" is not quite exact as the voltage will cycle between 110 to
> 120+ . If you are talking about global warming and conservation of
> energy-disconnect the power and Miami will have left a little more time to
> breathe easier above water.
>

Well put. I hit the middle road here: the PC goes off at night (most nights)
but once it's on the next day, it stays on all day. Reduced cycling (less
heat/cool, less surge), but conservation during obviously "extended
not-in-use" times.



 
Reply With Quote
 
=?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2007
Blinky the Shark wrote:

> When do your light bulbs usually blow --
> when you turn them on or when they've been on for a while?


Most often when they've been off for a while. But one good explanation
is that some small amount of loss of the vacuum in the bulb has slowly
allowed more oxygen into the bulb than it was designed for. When the
power is applied and the filament heats up, it burns in two rather than
just remain hot enough to glow.

Either that or it just lets the smoke out.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Whiskers
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-12-2007
On 2007-04-12, Rgr <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Blinky the Shark wrote:
>
>> When do your light bulbs usually blow --
>> when you turn them on or when they've been on for a while?

>
> Most often when they've been off for a while. But one good explanation
> is that some small amount of loss of the vacuum in the bulb has slowly
> allowed more oxygen into the bulb than it was designed for. When the
> power is applied and the filament heats up, it burns in two rather than
> just remain hot enough to glow.
>
> Either that or it just lets the smoke out.


As I understand it, incandescent filament bulbs are doomed from the moment
they are first used; electrons are emitted from the white-hot metal, and
when the bulb cools those electrons condense evenly over the whole of the
inside of the bulb, so the filament gets steadily thinner until eventually
it is too weak to take the slightest shock, often the shock of being
powered on or off.

--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Thermo Electric Cooling unholy Hardware 15 09-07-2005 07:56 AM
Electric razors vs normal? Brian Computer Support 31 09-13-2003 06:25 AM
Electric Clothes Dryer Bill Wolcott Computer Support 15 09-11-2003 07:40 AM
Re: That will teach you not to pay your electric bill !!! Gazwad Computer Support 7 08-22-2003 03:24 PM
That will teach you not to pay your electric bill !!! National Enforment Team Computer Support 6 08-18-2003 03:12 PM



Advertisments