Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Programming > HTML > Style vs. substance.

Reply
Thread Tools

Style vs. substance.

 
 
Jane Jesi
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-26-2007
Hello gentlemen. I am new to web design and I have a question concerning a
client. He has given me freedom to redesign his website. Is it better for a
website to have a "corporate" feel such as http://www.ea.com/language.jsp
or a more clean feel such as this small site at
http://globalwarmingawareness2007.org.uk which I think is a clean and very
simple design. While EA is definitely tough for a beginner, I feel that
writing a website like this (minus the JSP/flash part) would look better in
my portfolio. But on the other hand, I have deadlines for customers so I
don't know. Any advice please?
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
John Hosking
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-27-2007
Jane Jesi wrote:
> Hello gentlemen.


Poor Heidi, Els, Adrienne and Louise

> I am new to web design and I have a question concerning a
> client. He has given me freedom to redesign his website.


He *says*... Wait unitl you show him something.

> Is it better for a
> website to have a "corporate" feel such as http://www.ea.com/language.jsp


Doesn't look particularly "corporate" to me; _this_ looks corporate:
http://www.ubs.com/ (and BTW, it seems clean and simple to me, too).

> or a more clean feel such as this small site at
> http://globalwarmingawareness2007.org.uk which I think is a clean and very
> simple design.


Google ads and bold-on-black design, all in a 1200px table. Rather ick,
IMHO.

> While EA is definitely tough for a beginner, I feel that writing a
> website like this (minus the JSP/flash part) would look better in
> my portfolio.


If you take out the JS/Flash part, there's nothing left! The entire
content of the page (that which search engines will see and maybe try to
index) is:
"You don't have the latest version of Flash, download _here_."

You could add the *graphics work* to your portfolio, but as a *site* it
stinks, and its designer shouldn't mention it to anyone important.

I wouldn't pay money for either of these sites, so I wouldn't care to
recommend the look of either one.

The real answer to the question "Is it better for a website to have a
"corporate" feel or a more clean feel" is: Ask your client. Or at least,
it depends on the client. You didn't say whether the client is an
investment bank or governmental agency (rather corporate, usually), or a
music distributor targeting young people (friendly, casual, maybe
busier), or maybe an information resource for elderly folks (very clean,
clear, simple, large type, whitespace).

So: whatcha want? Or what does the client want? (Your freedom to
redesign his website includes freedom to ask what he's generally looking
for, how he wants to be seen, what results he hopes for from the site, etc.)

--
John
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Nikita the Spider
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-27-2007
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
Jane Jesi <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Hello gentlemen. I am new to web design and I have a question concerning a
> client. He has given me freedom to redesign his website. Is it better for a
> website to have a "corporate" feel such as http://www.ea.com/language.jsp
> or a more clean feel such as this small site at
> http://globalwarmingawareness2007.org.uk which I think is a clean and very
> simple design.


Which is better? Well it depends...is your client a punk rock band, a
bank or tea shop? All of these have different needs.

> While EA is definitely tough for a beginner, I feel that
> writing a website like this (minus the JSP/flash part) would look better in
> my portfolio. But on the other hand, I have deadlines for customers so I
> don't know. Any advice please?


Whether or not the site will look good in your portfolio seems besides
the point. The work is about satisfying the client, no? I imagine a
portfolio of satisfied clients would be the best possible one.

Good luck

--
Philip
http://NikitaTheSpider.com/
Whole-site HTML validation, link checking and more
 
Reply With Quote
 
Travis Newbury
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-27-2007
On Apr 26, 7:19 pm, Jane Jesi <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Hello gentlemen. I am new to web design and I have a question concerning a
> client....


I think you just wanted us to see the silly blame the humans for
natural global warming site.

 
Reply With Quote
 
Andy Dingley
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-27-2007
On 27 Apr, 00:19, Jane Jesi <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> He has given me freedom to redesign his website.


That's 'freedom' as in 'freedom to vote for Robert Mugabe' ?

Just wait until you show him mockups!

>Is it better for a website to have a "corporate" feel or a more clean feel ?


Both of the examples you posted are appalingly bad, but for different
reasons. They're technically diabolical and neither of them even has
the occasional saving grace of at least looking good.

 
Reply With Quote
 
Neredbojias
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-28-2007
On Thu, 26 Apr 2007 23:19:25 GMT Jane Jesi scribed:

> Hello gentlemen. I am new to web design and I have a question
> concerning a client. He has given me freedom to redesign his website.
> Is it better for a website to have a "corporate" feel such as
> http://www.ea.com/language.jsp or a more clean feel such as this small
> site at http://globalwarmingawareness2007.org.uk which I think is a
> clean and very simple design. While EA is definitely tough for a
> beginner, I feel that writing a website like this (minus the JSP/flash
> part) would look better in my portfolio. But on the other hand, I have
> deadlines for customers so I don't know. Any advice please?


Let me ask you this: do you actually know what you're doing? If you are
new to web design, you shouldn't have a client until you've learned
something about the craft you are trying to execute.

In any event, the best website is one which most closely sticks to
acceptable standards, -"feel" aside. Naturally, it should be aesthetically
pleasing, but how it works is more important than any visual rush that
probably wouldn't occur in most visitors, anyway. A facile, easy-to-digest
and -navigate site is highly preferable to multitudes of bells and whistles
which quickly become boring upon repeated encounters. Constructing such a
site does, of course, take some expertise.

--
Neredbojias
He who laughs last sounds like an idiot.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Chaddy2222
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-28-2007
On Apr 27, 9:19 am, Jane Jesi <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Hello gentlemen. I am new to web design and I have a question concerning a
> client. He has given me freedom to redesign his website. Is it better for a
> website to have a "corporate" feel such ashttp://www.ea.com/language.jsp
> or a more clean feel such as this small site athttp://globalwarmingawareness2007.org.ukwhich I think is a clean and very
> simple design. While EA is definitely tough for a beginner, I feel that
> writing a website like this (minus the JSP/flash part) would look better in
> my portfolio. But on the other hand, I have deadlines for customers so I
> don't know. Any advice please?

Web Design is about meeting your clients needs and from a users point
of view, assisting them in solving a problem. If your sites can do
that then your doing well.
--
Regards Chad. http://freewebdesign.cjb.cc

 
Reply With Quote
 
dorayme
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-28-2007
In article <Xns9920402FFFE42nanopandaneredbojias@208.49.80.25 1>,
Neredbojias <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> If you are
> new to web design, you shouldn't have a client until you've learned
> something about the craft you are trying to execute.


You old fuddy duddy! America was built on people taking wild
risks, learning on the job and so on. Do you have some book on
attitudes to take or do you actually think them up yourself?

--
dorayme
 
Reply With Quote
 
Andy Dingley
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-30-2007
On 28 Apr, 14:38, Chaddy2222 <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

> Web Design is about meeting your clients needs and from a users point
> of view, assisting them in solving a problem.


It's largely about recognising that these "clients" and "users" and
separate groups, often with conflicting interests. Good web design
(and I mean design, not just coding technicalities) is often about
resolving this conflict without either group realising they're being
manipulated.

 
Reply With Quote
 
Neredbojias
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-01-2007
On Sat, 28 Apr 2007 23:03:50 GMT dorayme scribed:

> In article <Xns9920402FFFE42nanopandaneredbojias@208.49.80.25 1>,
> Neredbojias <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> If you are
>> new to web design, you shouldn't have a client until you've learned
>> something about the craft you are trying to execute.

>
> You old fuddy duddy! America was built on people taking wild
> risks, learning on the job and so on. Do you have some book on
> attitudes to take or do you actually think them up yourself?


America was built on the backs of labourers too stupid and/or desperate to
oppose the entreprenurial elite. Often these labourers were foreign or
immigrants who felt themselves lucky just to have a job no matter how
shitty. There's a rule-of-thumb in Labor even today: "The harder you work
(physically), the less you get paid." I'm not saying that supervisors
aren't needed, but historically the disparity in wages is ludicrous.

America developed much like biological evolution. Not the best way, hardly
ever, but a viable way. It was far from perfect, but it worked. Now while
I support the concept that a man should benefit from the fruit of his
labors in proportion to his efforts, there are (to me) obvious limits which
should not be exceeded. I seriously doubt that it is equitable for someone
to earn 10,000 times the money of the average employee no matter what he
does or how good he is at doing it.

--
Neredbojias
He who laughs last sounds like an idiot.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
DataGrid header style inconsistent with sortable column style cedoucette@alum.rpi.edu ASP .Net 0 10-14-2005 12:13 AM
All style tags after the first 30 style tags on an HTML page are not applied in Internet Explorer Rob Nicholson ASP .Net 3 05-28-2005 03:11 PM
Need help with Style conversion from Style object to Style key/value collection. Ken Varn ASP .Net Building Controls 0 04-26-2004 07:06 PM
Javascript Style Switcher that remebers current site style in use Hardeep Rakhra HTML 8 01-15-2004 08:00 PM
Style sheets, include one style within another (not inheritance) foldface@yahoo.co.uk HTML 1 11-24-2003 01:37 PM



Advertisments