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Hot C: drive

 
 
DP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-13-2006
{{{{{Please note that I have posted this question to another newsgroup on
AMD 64-bit chips. Why? That NG and this one are on different servers and I
don't know how to post to them both at the same time using OE. If they were
both on the same server, I'd know how to do it. -dp }}}}


Does anyone know if dual-core chips (in my case an AMD) or Windows XP x64 or
both tend to cause the main drive (C to run hot?

I have a Western Digital SATA drive which I can easily get above 55 degrees
C, according to the HD Tune utility. The utility's web site also says drives
shouldn't be running above 50 degrees, and 60 degrees would be a big
problem. I have know way of knowing if that's true (unless I get the drive
past 60 and see if I smell smoke).

I'm just wondering if either the OS or the dual-core could be a culprit
based on anyone else's experience.

I have another SATA drive (a Maxtor) on the same machine that does not have
this problem (but I haven't tried making it the C: drive yet).


 
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Charlie Russel - MVP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-13-2006
No, there's no reason a dual core will cause it to run hotter. The reason it
will run hot is it's BUSY. You need to address the cooling in your case, or
find a better drive to use as C:. This one won't last long at those
temperatures.

--
Charlie.
http://msmvps.com/xperts64

DP wrote:
> {{{{{Please note that I have posted this question to another newsgroup on
> AMD 64-bit chips. Why? That NG and this one are on different servers and I
> don't know how to post to them both at the same time using OE. If they
> were both on the same server, I'd know how to do it. -dp }}}}
>
>
> Does anyone know if dual-core chips (in my case an AMD) or Windows XP x64
> or both tend to cause the main drive (C to run hot?
>
> I have a Western Digital SATA drive which I can easily get above 55
> degrees C, according to the HD Tune utility. The utility's web site also
> says drives shouldn't be running above 50 degrees, and 60 degrees would
> be a big problem. I have know way of knowing if that's true (unless I get
> the drive past 60 and see if I smell smoke).
>
> I'm just wondering if either the OS or the dual-core could be a culprit
> based on anyone else's experience.
>
> I have another SATA drive (a Maxtor) on the same machine that does not
> have this problem (but I haven't tried making it the C: drive yet).



 
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John Barnes
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-14-2006
Have you checked the fragmentation on the drive. If it is badly fragmented
it increase activity considerably.


"DP" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> {{{{{Please note that I have posted this question to another newsgroup on
> AMD 64-bit chips. Why? That NG and this one are on different servers and I
> don't know how to post to them both at the same time using OE. If they
> were both on the same server, I'd know how to do it. -dp }}}}
>
>
> Does anyone know if dual-core chips (in my case an AMD) or Windows XP x64
> or both tend to cause the main drive (C to run hot?
>
> I have a Western Digital SATA drive which I can easily get above 55
> degrees C, according to the HD Tune utility. The utility's web site also
> says drives shouldn't be running above 50 degrees, and 60 degrees would be
> a big problem. I have know way of knowing if that's true (unless I get the
> drive past 60 and see if I smell smoke).
>
> I'm just wondering if either the OS or the dual-core could be a culprit
> based on anyone else's experience.
>
> I have another SATA drive (a Maxtor) on the same machine that does not
> have this problem (but I haven't tried making it the C: drive yet).
>



 
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Tony Sperling
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-14-2006
In addition to the above, take a look inside to see how the drives are
mounted. If they sit in close proximity - to each other or anything else
that prevents free air-circulation, any one drive, or both, will tend to get
rather hot unless you have a dedicated fan at the front of the case. If you
have a small case with two HD and maybe two CD/DVD's and no dedicated fan -
I'd say: There's your answer!

Tony. . .


"DP" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> {{{{{Please note that I have posted this question to another newsgroup on
> AMD 64-bit chips. Why? That NG and this one are on different servers and I
> don't know how to post to them both at the same time using OE. If they
> were both on the same server, I'd know how to do it. -dp }}}}
>
>
> Does anyone know if dual-core chips (in my case an AMD) or Windows XP x64
> or both tend to cause the main drive (C to run hot?
>
> I have a Western Digital SATA drive which I can easily get above 55
> degrees C, according to the HD Tune utility. The utility's web site also
> says drives shouldn't be running above 50 degrees, and 60 degrees would be
> a big problem. I have know way of knowing if that's true (unless I get the
> drive past 60 and see if I smell smoke).
>
> I'm just wondering if either the OS or the dual-core could be a culprit
> based on anyone else's experience.
>
> I have another SATA drive (a Maxtor) on the same machine that does not
> have this problem (but I haven't tried making it the C: drive yet).
>



 
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DP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-14-2006

Since the whole rig is relatively new, the usually drive isn't very
fragmented and I defrag it often, so that's not an issue.




"John Barnes" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Have you checked the fragmentation on the drive. If it is badly
> fragmented it increase activity considerably.
>
>
> "DP" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> {{{{{Please note that I have posted this question to another newsgroup on
>> AMD 64-bit chips. Why? That NG and this one are on different servers and
>> I don't know how to post to them both at the same time using OE. If they
>> were both on the same server, I'd know how to do it. -dp }}}}
>>
>>
>> Does anyone know if dual-core chips (in my case an AMD) or Windows XP x64
>> or both tend to cause the main drive (C to run hot?
>>
>> I have a Western Digital SATA drive which I can easily get above 55
>> degrees C, according to the HD Tune utility. The utility's web site also
>> says drives shouldn't be running above 50 degrees, and 60 degrees would
>> be a big problem. I have know way of knowing if that's true (unless I get
>> the drive past 60 and see if I smell smoke).
>>
>> I'm just wondering if either the OS or the dual-core could be a culprit
>> based on anyone else's experience.
>>
>> I have another SATA drive (a Maxtor) on the same machine that does not
>> have this problem (but I haven't tried making it the C: drive yet).
>>

>
>



 
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DP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-14-2006
The other HD, which I mounted after I bought the machine, is neaby but not
directly adjacent to it.
In other words, I have three 3.5 inch bays. The C drive is in the bottom bay
and the second HD is in the top bay. So there is a whole drive bay between
them.

There was a plastic box directly under the C drive. Looks like it was
designed to hold a fan that would blow out (or draw from) the front grill.
But there was no fan there. So I took the box out and that helped a little
(I did this before my OP). But I can still get the drive up to 50 degrees C
fairly easily. This behavior, of course, is unacceptable.

I've bought a drive fan that works out of a 5.25 bay. I'll probably move C:
into the fan and into the larger bay, which will put it a little further
away from the other HD and see if that works.

Meanwhile, I've backed up my crucial files.



"Tony Sperling" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> In addition to the above, take a look inside to see how the drives are
> mounted. If they sit in close proximity - to each other or anything else
> that prevents free air-circulation, any one drive, or both, will tend to
> get rather hot unless you have a dedicated fan at the front of the case.
> If you have a small case with two HD and maybe two CD/DVD's and no
> dedicated fan - I'd say: There's your answer!
>
> Tony. . .
>
>
> "DP" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> {{{{{Please note that I have posted this question to another newsgroup on
>> AMD 64-bit chips. Why? That NG and this one are on different servers and
>> I don't know how to post to them both at the same time using OE. If they
>> were both on the same server, I'd know how to do it. -dp }}}}
>>
>>
>> Does anyone know if dual-core chips (in my case an AMD) or Windows XP x64
>> or both tend to cause the main drive (C to run hot?
>>
>> I have a Western Digital SATA drive which I can easily get above 55
>> degrees C, according to the HD Tune utility. The utility's web site also
>> says drives shouldn't be running above 50 degrees, and 60 degrees would
>> be a big problem. I have know way of knowing if that's true (unless I get
>> the drive past 60 and see if I smell smoke).
>>
>> I'm just wondering if either the OS or the dual-core could be a culprit
>> based on anyone else's experience.
>>
>> I have another SATA drive (a Maxtor) on the same machine that does not
>> have this problem (but I haven't tried making it the C: drive yet).
>>

>
>



 
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Peter Lawton
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-14-2006
I've got a big fan blowing directly over the HDDs in my case and they run
very cool and they are 15K RPM SCSI, I suspect you just need some forced air
flow over your drives, quite a lot of fast drives these days do need more
than natural cooling.

Peter Lawton

"DP" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> The other HD, which I mounted after I bought the machine, is neaby but not
> directly adjacent to it.
> In other words, I have three 3.5 inch bays. The C drive is in the bottom
> bay and the second HD is in the top bay. So there is a whole drive bay
> between them.
>
> There was a plastic box directly under the C drive. Looks like it was
> designed to hold a fan that would blow out (or draw from) the front grill.
> But there was no fan there. So I took the box out and that helped a little
> (I did this before my OP). But I can still get the drive up to 50 degrees
> C fairly easily. This behavior, of course, is unacceptable.
>
> I've bought a drive fan that works out of a 5.25 bay. I'll probably move
> C: into the fan and into the larger bay, which will put it a little
> further away from the other HD and see if that works.
>
> Meanwhile, I've backed up my crucial files.
>
>
>
> "Tony Sperling" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> In addition to the above, take a look inside to see how the drives are
>> mounted. If they sit in close proximity - to each other or anything else
>> that prevents free air-circulation, any one drive, or both, will tend to
>> get rather hot unless you have a dedicated fan at the front of the case.
>> If you have a small case with two HD and maybe two CD/DVD's and no
>> dedicated fan - I'd say: There's your answer!
>>
>> Tony. . .
>>
>>
>> "DP" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>> {{{{{Please note that I have posted this question to another newsgroup
>>> on AMD 64-bit chips. Why? That NG and this one are on different servers
>>> and I don't know how to post to them both at the same time using OE. If
>>> they were both on the same server, I'd know how to do it. -dp }}}}
>>>
>>>
>>> Does anyone know if dual-core chips (in my case an AMD) or Windows XP
>>> x64 or both tend to cause the main drive (C to run hot?
>>>
>>> I have a Western Digital SATA drive which I can easily get above 55
>>> degrees C, according to the HD Tune utility. The utility's web site also
>>> says drives shouldn't be running above 50 degrees, and 60 degrees would
>>> be a big problem. I have know way of knowing if that's true (unless I
>>> get the drive past 60 and see if I smell smoke).
>>>
>>> I'm just wondering if either the OS or the dual-core could be a culprit
>>> based on anyone else's experience.
>>>
>>> I have another SATA drive (a Maxtor) on the same machine that does not
>>> have this problem (but I haven't tried making it the C: drive yet).
>>>

>>
>>

>
>



 
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Tony Sperling
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-14-2006
Backing up, probably is not overly cautious. I think I might want to put on
a belt and suspenders too.

Like Charlie said, is the HD active all the time? If so, check task manager
and see if you find anything obvious. Is there anything at all that you
think is strange about that drive? Like, not having the full capacity, or
anything? If nothing else crops up, I might consider re-installing
everything from scratch. Re-partitioning and everything!

I agree, with an empty bay in between, that is not an issue in itself - how
is the processsor temperature? Graphic Card? Perhaps you need a dedicated
exhaust from that one? The extra fan you mention, you will definitely need.

I've seen a Motherboard with the chipset cooler (sink) mounted at the back
of the AGP connector such that it expelled right into the Graphic Card's
ventilation, no big temperatures to start with, but it was building up and
there was nothing to stop it and over a few hours the whole case was more
than warm. You need to put the whole of that machines inside under scrutiny,
I think.

And don't forget to look at the 'flat cables' - an exchange to the 'round'
type might help as well.


Tony. . .


"DP" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> The other HD, which I mounted after I bought the machine, is neaby but not
> directly adjacent to it.
> In other words, I have three 3.5 inch bays. The C drive is in the bottom
> bay and the second HD is in the top bay. So there is a whole drive bay
> between them.
>
> There was a plastic box directly under the C drive. Looks like it was
> designed to hold a fan that would blow out (or draw from) the front grill.
> But there was no fan there. So I took the box out and that helped a little
> (I did this before my OP). But I can still get the drive up to 50 degrees
> C fairly easily. This behavior, of course, is unacceptable.
>
> I've bought a drive fan that works out of a 5.25 bay. I'll probably move
> C: into the fan and into the larger bay, which will put it a little
> further away from the other HD and see if that works.
>
> Meanwhile, I've backed up my crucial files.
>
>
>
> "Tony Sperling" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> In addition to the above, take a look inside to see how the drives are
>> mounted. If they sit in close proximity - to each other or anything else
>> that prevents free air-circulation, any one drive, or both, will tend to
>> get rather hot unless you have a dedicated fan at the front of the case.
>> If you have a small case with two HD and maybe two CD/DVD's and no
>> dedicated fan - I'd say: There's your answer!
>>
>> Tony. . .
>>
>>
>> "DP" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>> {{{{{Please note that I have posted this question to another newsgroup
>>> on AMD 64-bit chips. Why? That NG and this one are on different servers
>>> and I don't know how to post to them both at the same time using OE. If
>>> they were both on the same server, I'd know how to do it. -dp }}}}
>>>
>>>
>>> Does anyone know if dual-core chips (in my case an AMD) or Windows XP
>>> x64 or both tend to cause the main drive (C to run hot?
>>>
>>> I have a Western Digital SATA drive which I can easily get above 55
>>> degrees C, according to the HD Tune utility. The utility's web site also
>>> says drives shouldn't be running above 50 degrees, and 60 degrees would
>>> be a big problem. I have know way of knowing if that's true (unless I
>>> get the drive past 60 and see if I smell smoke).
>>>
>>> I'm just wondering if either the OS or the dual-core could be a culprit
>>> based on anyone else's experience.
>>>
>>> I have another SATA drive (a Maxtor) on the same machine that does not
>>> have this problem (but I haven't tried making it the C: drive yet).
>>>

>>
>>

>
>



 
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nopop.email@here.com
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-15-2006
That's pretty much the same layout of HDs in my machine, which had the
same overheating problems, although I kept the box in as I'd mounted
an intake fan there. As an experiment I put one of the HD coolers that
fix to the underside of the drive between them (mounted to the drive
cage, rather than the HD itself), and the temp dropped right down. It
doesn't seem to take much airflow at all to cool the disks to an
acceptable level.

>On Thu, 13 Apr 2006 20:23:12 -0500, "DP" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:


>The other HD, which I mounted after I bought the machine, is neaby but not
>directly adjacent to it.
>In other words, I have three 3.5 inch bays. The C drive is in the bottom bay
>and the second HD is in the top bay. So there is a whole drive bay between
>them.
>
>There was a plastic box directly under the C drive. Looks like it was
>designed to hold a fan that would blow out (or draw from) the front grill.
>But there was no fan there. So I took the box out and that helped a little
>(I did this before my OP). But I can still get the drive up to 50 degrees C
>fairly easily. This behavior, of course, is unacceptable.
>
>I've bought a drive fan that works out of a 5.25 bay. I'll probably move C:
>into the fan and into the larger bay, which will put it a little further
>away from the other HD and see if that works.
>
>Meanwhile, I've backed up my crucial files.

 
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DP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-15-2006

<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> That's pretty much the same layout of HDs in my machine, which had the
> same overheating problems, although I kept the box in as I'd mounted
> an intake fan there. As an experiment I put one of the HD coolers that
> fix to the underside of the drive between them (mounted to the drive
> cage, rather than the HD itself), and the temp dropped right down. It
> doesn't seem to take much airflow at all to cool the disks to an
> acceptable level.
>



I went to compusa and bought the only type of drive cooler I could see
there. It fits into a 5.25 in bay and has three small fans that blow out
through the front. It also acts as an adapter, so I can fit a 3.5 inch drive
in there.

It was easier for me to move the drive that wasn't heating up to connect it
with the three-fan adapter. At least that puts more separation between the
drives and blows some more hot air out of the computer case. That seems to
have slowed down the rate at which the C: drive gets hot, but hasn't
eliminated the problem.

Earlier today I ordered the type of cooler you're talking about, the one
that attaches to the bottom of the drive itself. Hope that'll do something.
But it'll be several days before that arrives. Until then, I'll be keeping
my eye on the HD Tune readout in the system tray.

Thanks.



 
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