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Dual boot partition scheme

 
 
Dennis Gordon
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      09-11-2005
I have the most of the parts for my new build. Just need CPU, mobo and case.

Like many of you, I'll dual boot with XP Pro.

I have 3 - 15K SCSI u160 or u320 drives and an LSI u160 controller. 18G,
36G, 73G (Seagate, IBM, Fujitsu). Good, fast drives.

I figured to set them up in the order of size: XP on the small one (C), XP64
on the middle (D), and leave the big one for storage (probably adding a big
SATA as well.)

Would there be a better configuration, such as partitioning one of the
smaller drives for OSes only?


 
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Tony Sperling
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      09-11-2005
It's mostly a matter of taste. Any other scheme you could possibly think of,
would in all likelihood be preferable to someone else. Personally, though, I
much prefer having each OS on its own Primary Partition, and with three of
them drives - that has to be the easiest solution, so no need for persuation
here.

Tony. . .


"Dennis Gordon" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>I have the most of the parts for my new build. Just need CPU, mobo and
>case.
>
> Like many of you, I'll dual boot with XP Pro.
>
> I have 3 - 15K SCSI u160 or u320 drives and an LSI u160 controller. 18G,
> 36G, 73G (Seagate, IBM, Fujitsu). Good, fast drives.
>
> I figured to set them up in the order of size: XP on the small one (C),
> XP64
> on the middle (D), and leave the big one for storage (probably adding a
> big
> SATA as well.)
>
> Would there be a better configuration, such as partitioning one of the
> smaller drives for OSes only?
>
>



 
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miso@sushi.com
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      09-11-2005
I like the idea of having the user data on its own drive. This way if
the OS drive gets so hosed that it needs a total rebuild, you don't
lose the user data.

I had 3 SCSI drives as well, but decided just to buy SATAs and go raid.
These Seagate SATA are quiet and fast. I ran the IOmeter on the full
package for two users and got Iops=812.33 running raid 10. The newer
mobos have SATA raid built in. I used Gigabyte Nforce4 Ultra, which
has two SATA raids.

 
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Dennis Gordon
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      09-11-2005
I'm still running Raid 0 on my "old" Gigabyte GA8-IHP. Still works pretty
good, but I've always wanted to give an all SCSI system a try. If I find I
don't like it or need it I'll move them into a file server where they'll be
useful.


<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
> I like the idea of having the user data on its own drive. This way if
> the OS drive gets so hosed that it needs a total rebuild, you don't
> lose the user data.
>
> I had 3 SCSI drives as well, but decided just to buy SATAs and go raid.
> These Seagate SATA are quiet and fast. I ran the IOmeter on the full
> package for two users and got Iops=812.33 running raid 10. The newer
> mobos have SATA raid built in. I used Gigabyte Nforce4 Ultra, which
> has two SATA raids.
>



 
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miso@sushi.com
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      09-11-2005
I've done the all SCSI path. I've got a PC with 3 10kRPM drives.
Incidentally, I can't stand my Fujistu drive because of bearing noise.
It started loud, and grew louder with age. The Seagate drives are still
fine. When I went raid, I used 4 seagate 300MByte driver in Raid 10.
They are about $100 each at the moment (About $150 when I bought them a
few months ago). You can barely hear them running, and I'm using the
Silent PC case, a low RPM heat pipe CPU cooler, a Seasonic power supply
with smart fan, and a heat pipe on the video card. In other words,
there isn't much to drown out the drive noise.

If you're building a system and a few hundred bucks isn't going to
break you, I'd just get the SATA drives and go raid. The Gigabyte
boards support raid5, which is a bit more efficient, but these SATA
drives are so cheap relative to the SCSI beasts I've bought in the past
that RAID 10 seemed like the way to go.

The Seagate drives have native command queing, what ever that means,
but benchmarkers claim that isn't much of an advantage. I just like
Seagate drives because they are the least trouble out of any drive I've
used.

Incidentally, the loudest component is the Gigabyte heat pipe CPU
cooler, even when run at the lowest speed. It's a quiet cooler, but
still the loudest component However, I built a PC using the same
cooler and I can tell you it that at the minimum speed I can't get a
AMD64 to go over 50 deg C. I ran some CPU intensive games and CPU
intensitve imaging software to get the CPU hot.

 
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honjo
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      09-12-2005
If I were you, I would do the following:

Connect 36G HD to channel 0 and create three primary partitions and one
extended partition. Install WXP 32Bit on the first partition, WXP 64Bit
on the second partition, and W2K on the third partition. When WXP 64Bit
is installed, change the active partition from the first to the second
partition then boot to WXP 64Bit CDROM to begin installation. Do
likewise when installing W2K.

Install Partition Magic on all OSs and use a utility called "PQBoot for
Windows" to switch among these OSs. This way OS drive becomes always C:
regardless of which one is booted. If no boot situation arises use DOS
version of PQBoot to boot one of the other OSs.

The extended partition is used to store data: Modify default settings
for all application software so that user created data are funneled to
this data storage area.

Connect 36G HD to channel 1, create one primary partition of about 10GB
and copy installed W2K from the above. This becomes handy to trouble
shoot when all OSs on the channel 0 HD fail to boot. To boot this W2K
boot priority setting has to be changed by the BIOS.

The remaining area in 36GB HD and all 18GB HD are used as data storage
space.

Kaz
 
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Dennis Gordon
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-12-2005
I just got the 73G Fujitsu. I've only fired it up to see if it worked (it
does). Seems pretty quiet to me for a 15K drive. Cost about $200 and it's
fast. The IBM OTOH sounds like a jet spinning up and drones pretty loud. It
doesn't bother me much. I hope having the tree drives in the box doesn't
make the machine sound like it belongs in the server room. That's where
they'll wind up if it's too noisy...


<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
> I've done the all SCSI path. I've got a PC with 3 10kRPM drives.
> Incidentally, I can't stand my Fujistu drive because of bearing noise.
> It started loud, and grew louder with age. The Seagate drives are still
> fine. When I went raid, I used 4 seagate 300MByte driver in Raid 10.
> They are about $100 each at the moment (About $150 when I bought them a
> few months ago). You can barely hear them running, and I'm using the
> Silent PC case, a low RPM heat pipe CPU cooler, a Seasonic power supply
> with smart fan, and a heat pipe on the video card. In other words,
> there isn't much to drown out the drive noise.
>
> If you're building a system and a few hundred bucks isn't going to
> break you, I'd just get the SATA drives and go raid. The Gigabyte
> boards support raid5, which is a bit more efficient, but these SATA
> drives are so cheap relative to the SCSI beasts I've bought in the past
> that RAID 10 seemed like the way to go.
>
> The Seagate drives have native command queing, what ever that means,
> but benchmarkers claim that isn't much of an advantage. I just like
> Seagate drives because they are the least trouble out of any drive I've
> used.
>
> Incidentally, the loudest component is the Gigabyte heat pipe CPU
> cooler, even when run at the lowest speed. It's a quiet cooler, but
> still the loudest component However, I built a PC using the same
> cooler and I can tell you it that at the minimum speed I can't get a
> AMD64 to go over 50 deg C. I ran some CPU intensive games and CPU
> intensitve imaging software to get the CPU hot.
>



 
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Dennis Gordon
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-12-2005
Wow, now that's the kind of detailed alternative that I was looking for. Not
that I understand it much...

I presume you meant connecting the *73* gig drive to channel 1, not the 36
gigger.

I'm not quite clear on the 2K necessity. I've never had both OSes on one
machine fail so that I couldn't get into one to get data off and repair the
other.

Would "PQBoot for Windows" give problems to the multiple installations of
software such as InDesign and Photoshop for each OS?

It is a cool suggestion however. Thanks...

"honjo" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> If I were you, I would do the following:
>
> Connect 36G HD to channel 0 and create three primary partitions and one
> extended partition. Install WXP 32Bit on the first partition, WXP 64Bit
> on the second partition, and W2K on the third partition. When WXP 64Bit
> is installed, change the active partition from the first to the second
> partition then boot to WXP 64Bit CDROM to begin installation. Do
> likewise when installing W2K.
>
> Install Partition Magic on all OSs and use a utility called "PQBoot for
> Windows" to switch among these OSs. This way OS drive becomes always C:
> regardless of which one is booted. If no boot situation arises use DOS
> version of PQBoot to boot one of the other OSs.
>
> The extended partition is used to store data: Modify default settings
> for all application software so that user created data are funneled to
> this data storage area.
>
> Connect 36G HD to channel 1, create one primary partition of about 10GB
> and copy installed W2K from the above. This becomes handy to trouble
> shoot when all OSs on the channel 0 HD fail to boot. To boot this W2K
> boot priority setting has to be changed by the BIOS.
>
> The remaining area in 36GB HD and all 18GB HD are used as data storage
> space.
>
> Kaz



 
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honjo
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      09-12-2005
Dennis Gordon wrote:
> >

> I presume you meant connecting the *73* gig drive to channel 1, not the 36
> gigger.
>

That is correct. But connect it to the youngest SCSI address AMONG those
for the SCSI drives so that channel number assinged to 73GB drive
becomes O. The reason is that PQBoot for Windows can be used to switch
among OSs which are installed only in channel 0 drive. Assumption here
is that no IDE drive is used.
If you want to boot an OS in other physical drive then this physical
drive need be set as the boot physical drive by changing SCSI BIOS setting.

> I'm not quite clear on the 2K necessity.


If you do not have W2K then just ignore this. The reason I install W2K
is that you can view any other primary partition from W2K. Viewing other
primary partition is not this simple from WXP: You have to first Unhide
the one you want to see by using Partition Magic or similar disk
utility. Installing W2K is primarily for trouble shooting purpose.

>I've never had both OSes on one
> machine fail so that I couldn't get into one to get data off and repair the
> other.


I am not sure if I understand this correctly. But if you implement
multi-boot system by the popular way or using NT boot manager which is
included in NT based OS(W2K, WXP), then there is possibility that all
OSs becomes non-bootable at the same time. My suggested way avoid this
to happen.
>
> Would "PQBoot for Windows" give problems to the multiple installations of
> software such as InDesign and Photoshop for each OS?


No problem. I am using Creative Suite CS2. "PQBoot for Windows" is a
Windows based utility which comes in PartitionMagic 8. Also included in
the package is DOS based PQBoot which is used when Windows OS fails to boot.

Kaz
 
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Dennis Gordon
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-12-2005
Thanks for the clarification....


"honjo" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:%23EfNOf%(E-Mail Removed)...
> Dennis Gordon wrote:
>> >

>> I presume you meant connecting the *73* gig drive to channel 1, not the
>> 36
>> gigger.
>>

> That is correct. But connect it to the youngest SCSI address AMONG those
> for the SCSI drives so that channel number assinged to 73GB drive
> becomes O. The reason is that PQBoot for Windows can be used to switch
> among OSs which are installed only in channel 0 drive. Assumption here
> is that no IDE drive is used.
> If you want to boot an OS in other physical drive then this physical
> drive need be set as the boot physical drive by changing SCSI BIOS
> setting.
>
>> I'm not quite clear on the 2K necessity.

>
> If you do not have W2K then just ignore this. The reason I install W2K
> is that you can view any other primary partition from W2K. Viewing other
> primary partition is not this simple from WXP: You have to first Unhide
> the one you want to see by using Partition Magic or similar disk
> utility. Installing W2K is primarily for trouble shooting purpose.
>
>>I've never had both OSes on one
>> machine fail so that I couldn't get into one to get data off and repair
>> the
>> other.

>
> I am not sure if I understand this correctly. But if you implement
> multi-boot system by the popular way or using NT boot manager which is
> included in NT based OS(W2K, WXP), then there is possibility that all
> OSs becomes non-bootable at the same time. My suggested way avoid this
> to happen.
>>
>> Would "PQBoot for Windows" give problems to the multiple installations
>> of
>> software such as InDesign and Photoshop for each OS?

>
> No problem. I am using Creative Suite CS2. "PQBoot for Windows" is a
> Windows based utility which comes in PartitionMagic 8. Also included in
> the package is DOS based PQBoot which is used when Windows OS fails to
> boot.
>
> Kaz



 
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