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Which macro flash system works best?

 
 
Rich
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      03-24-2007
A true flash ring, one of those LED/constantly on light rings or a
Nikon-style twin or triple rectangular light flash system? I'd guess
the LED/normal light non-flash rigs are the cheapest and probably the
least effective?

 
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Joseph Meehan
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      03-24-2007
Rich wrote:
> A true flash ring, one of those LED/constantly on light rings or a
> Nikon-style twin or triple rectangular light flash system? I'd guess
> the LED/normal light non-flash rigs are the cheapest and probably the
> least effective?


Maybe it is neither. Flash rings are handy and generally easy to use,
but they seldom are the "best" when you are considering the quality of the
light.

Depending on your needs you may want defused light or hard light, you
may want even light or modeling light with some direction. You might even
want back light or side lighting.

The more information you can provide the more likely someone will be
able to offer useful information.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia 's Muire duit



 
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Rich
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      03-25-2007
On Mar 24, 6:02 pm, "Joseph Meehan" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:
> Rich wrote:
> > A true flash ring, one of those LED/constantly on light rings or a
> > Nikon-style twin or triple rectangular light flash system? I'd guess
> > the LED/normal light non-flash rigs are the cheapest and probably the
> > least effective?

>
> Maybe it is neither. Flash rings are handy and generally easy to use,
> but they seldom are the "best" when you are considering the quality of the
> light.
>
> Depending on your needs you may want defused light or hard light, you
> may want even light or modeling light with some direction. You might even
> want back light or side lighting.
>
> The more information you can provide the more likely someone will be
> able to offer useful information.
>


This would be for macro shots of insects, etc, very close shots likely
taken where things like light boxes would be impractical.


 
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King Sardon
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      03-25-2007
On 24 Mar 2007 18:44:26 -0700, "Rich" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Mar 24, 6:02 pm, "Joseph Meehan" <(E-Mail Removed)>
>wrote:
>> Rich wrote:
>> > A true flash ring, one of those LED/constantly on light rings or a
>> > Nikon-style twin or triple rectangular light flash system? I'd guess
>> > the LED/normal light non-flash rigs are the cheapest and probably the
>> > least effective?

>>
>> Maybe it is neither. Flash rings are handy and generally easy to use,
>> but they seldom are the "best" when you are considering the quality of the
>> light.
>>
>> Depending on your needs you may want defused light or hard light, you
>> may want even light or modeling light with some direction. You might even
>> want back light or side lighting.
>>
>> The more information you can provide the more likely someone will be
>> able to offer useful information.
>>

>
>This would be for macro shots of insects, etc, very close shots likely
>taken where things like light boxes would be impractical.


There are many ways to approach lighting for close-up photography of
bugs, etc. Ordinary flash is great because it stops motion, but it
tends to leave the background too dark, and the light is very
directional unless you use a diffuser of some kind... the size of
which might scare the bug.

It helps to have two flash units, one on each side to improve
lighting. They don't have to be very powerful, but natch have to work
conveniently with your camera.

Look into Wimberley brackets to support the camera and the flashes.
This can get very expensive very fast. A much lower cost solution is
the Manfrotto Macro Bracket Support.

It's best to use a long lens that has (maybe with a closeup lens or
extension tube) closeup capabilities. You need enough working room
between the lens and the bug or you will scare the bug. Select the
lens; that will determine the working distance and help decide on how
you want to rig the flashes.

KS
 
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tomm42
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      03-26-2007
On Mar 24, 2:19 pm, "Rich" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> A true flash ring, one of those LED/constantly on light rings or a
> Nikon-style twin or triple rectangular light flash system? I'd guess
> the LED/normal light non-flash rigs are the cheapest and probably the
> least effective?



Rich,
The Nikon R1C1 with an SU800 controler is probably the best right now.
Comes with 2 flash heads, you can use up to 8. Wireless with either
the Nikon Command system or the SU800 (more control than the in camera
command). Light weight, comes with diffusers. Small flash head so
reflections are small. If you want a higher level unit some high end
studio flashes have fiber optic extensions to their flash heads, Bron,
Balcar.

Tom

 
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