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Pipe Volume Math Question

 
 
Jimi
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      03-18-2007
Hello,

I am filling a pipe with glycol.. The pipe is 1/2" (inside diameter).
I need to know how many imperial gallons per 100 feet this pipe will hold so
I can figure out how much glycol to buy.
Thanks for any help on this. Jim


 
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SJP
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      03-18-2007

"Jimi" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hello,
>
> I am filling a pipe with glycol.. The pipe is 1/2" (inside
> diameter).
> I need to know how many imperial gallons per 100 feet this pipe will hold
> so
> I can figure out how much glycol to buy.
> Thanks for any help on this. Jim
>
>

3.397301 Gallons


 
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Robb
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      03-18-2007
Jimi wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I am filling a pipe with glycol.. The pipe is 1/2" (inside diameter).
>I need to know how many imperial gallons per 100 feet this pipe will hold so
>I can figure out how much glycol to buy.


Ask a scientist, or try this formula.
--

Question From:
Sammy, Age 8.

My Dad and I are going to build a sail boat using PVC pipes for flotation.
Is there an easy way to caculate how many 8 foot long, eight inch diameter
pipes we will need to support our weight and keep the boat floating?


Answer:

The weight that the pipes will support is the weight of the water they can
displace minus the weight of the pipes themselves. To calculate this, you
need to know the volume of the pipes, the weight of the pipes, and the
density (weight/volume) of water.

Fresh water has a density of 1 kg/liter. Salt water has a higher density.
The volume of the pipes can be calculated from their diameter and length
by the formula

V = L pi r^2, where
L is the length of the pipe, 8 ft = 96 in.,
pi = 3.14159,
r is the radius of the pipe, 4 in.

So the volume of a pipe is

V = (96 in)(3.14)(4 in)^2
= (96 in)(3.14)(16 in^2)
= 4823 in^3

Now you need to convert cubic inches to liters. 1 cubic inch = 0.01639
liters, so

V = (4823 in^3)(0.01639 L/in^3)
= 79 L.

So, in fresh water, an 8-ft length of 8-in diameter PVC pipe can float 79
kg minus its own weight.

[attrib lost, from the 'net]

--
Robb
 
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Old Gringo
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      03-18-2007
On Or About Sun, 18 Mar 2007 10:06:09 -0600, Without Any Hesitation
Or Thinking Twice, Jimi Stumbled Over To The Keyboard And wrote The
Following In The 24hoursupport.helpdesk News Group:

> Hello,
>
> I am filling a pipe with glycol.. The pipe is 1/2" (inside diameter).
> I need to know how many imperial gallons per 100 feet this pipe will hold so
> I can figure out how much glycol to buy.
> Thanks for any help on this. Jim


http://www.inter-mountain.com/Pipe_Related_Formulas.htm
--
Just West Of Nowhere
Enjoy Life And Live It To Its Fullest
http://www.NuBoy-Industries.Com
3/18/2007 12:05:53 PM CST
 
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Whiskers
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-18-2007
On 2007-03-18, Jimi <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I am filling a pipe with glycol.. The pipe is 1/2" (inside diameter).
> I need to know how many imperial gallons per 100 feet this pipe will hold so
> I can figure out how much glycol to buy.
> Thanks for any help on this. Jim


First-form maths!

The volume of a cylinder (a pipe is a cylinder) is (22*r*r*h)/7 where r is
the radius (half the diameter) and h is the height (or length, if you
like), and 22/7 is pi. Make sure that you use the same units (either feet
or inches) for both radius and height!

1 imperial gallon is 277.4193 cubic inches or 0.160544 cubic feet.

--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
 
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Geoff Pearson
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      03-18-2007

"Whiskers" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On 2007-03-18, Jimi <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> Hello,
>>
>> I am filling a pipe with glycol.. The pipe is 1/2" (inside
>> diameter).
>> I need to know how many imperial gallons per 100 feet this pipe will hold
>> so
>> I can figure out how much glycol to buy.
>> Thanks for any help on this. Jim

>
> First-form maths!
>
> The volume of a cylinder (a pipe is a cylinder) is (22*r*r*h)/7 where r is
> the radius (half the diameter) and h is the height (or length, if you
> like), and 22/7 is pi. Make sure that you use the same units (either feet
> or inches) for both radius and height!
>
> 1 imperial gallon is 277.4193 cubic inches or 0.160544 cubic feet.
>
> --
> -- ^^^^^^^^^^
> -- Whiskers
> -- ~~~~~~~~~~


It is amazing that anyone does these calculations in imperial measure now.


 
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Mike Easter
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      03-18-2007
Jimi wrote:

> I am filling a pipe with glycol.. The pipe is 1/2" (inside
> diameter). I need to know how many imperial gallons per 100 feet this
> pipe will hold so I can figure out how much glycol to buy.


Numerator = cross-sectional area of pipe cm^2 x pipe length cm x ImpGal
Denominator = conversion units for ImpGal cm^3

Values: 0.5 " ID = 0.25" radius = .635 cm
Xsec = pi x r^2 = pi x .635^2 cm^2

100' = 30480 cm = 3 x 10^4 cm
ImpGal = 4546.09 cm^3 = 4.546 x 10^3 cm^3

Numerator = pi x .635^2 x 3.048 x 10^4 cm^3 x ImpGal
Denominator = 4.546 x 10^3 cm^3

I get 8.49 Imp Gal

It seems like 100 feet of 1/2 inch pipe could hold something less than
10 gallons of liquid.

--
Mike Easter

 
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philo
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-18-2007

"SJP" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "Jimi" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > Hello,
> >
> > I am filling a pipe with glycol.. The pipe is 1/2" (inside
> > diameter).
> > I need to know how many imperial gallons per 100 feet this pipe will

hold
> > so
> > I can figure out how much glycol to buy.
> > Thanks for any help on this. Jim
> >
> >

> 3.397301 Gallons
>
>


but i'd purchase 3.397302 gallons , just to be on the safe side.

I think it's a school math problem though



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

 
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Whiskers
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      03-18-2007
On 2007-03-18, Geoff Pearson <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> "Whiskers" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> On 2007-03-18, Jimi <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> Hello,
>>>
>>> I am filling a pipe with glycol.. The pipe is 1/2" (inside
>>> diameter).
>>> I need to know how many imperial gallons per 100 feet this pipe will hold
>>> so
>>> I can figure out how much glycol to buy.
>>> Thanks for any help on this. Jim

>>
>> First-form maths!
>>
>> The volume of a cylinder (a pipe is a cylinder) is (22*r*r*h)/7 where r is
>> the radius (half the diameter) and h is the height (or length, if you
>> like), and 22/7 is pi. Make sure that you use the same units (either feet
>> or inches) for both radius and height!
>>
>> 1 imperial gallon is 277.4193 cubic inches or 0.160544 cubic feet.

>
> It is amazing that anyone does these calculations in imperial measure now.


Perhaps he's got these old pipes and hasn't heard that shops now have to
sell stuff in litres?

--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
 
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Whiskers
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-18-2007
On 2007-03-18, Mike Easter <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Jimi wrote:
>
>> I am filling a pipe with glycol.. The pipe is 1/2" (inside
>> diameter). I need to know how many imperial gallons per 100 feet this
>> pipe will hold so I can figure out how much glycol to buy.

>
> Numerator = cross-sectional area of pipe cm^2 x pipe length cm x ImpGal
> Denominator = conversion units for ImpGal cm^3
>
> Values: 0.5 " ID = 0.25" radius = .635 cm
> Xsec = pi x r^2 = pi x .635^2 cm^2
>
> 100' = 30480 cm = 3 x 10^4 cm
> ImpGal = 4546.09 cm^3 = 4.546 x 10^3 cm^3
>
> Numerator = pi x .635^2 x 3.048 x 10^4 cm^3 x ImpGal
> Denominator = 4.546 x 10^3 cm^3
>
> I get 8.49 Imp Gal
>
> It seems like 100 feet of 1/2 inch pipe could hold something less than
> 10 gallons of liquid.


I think you let your decimal point slip a bit somewhere in there.

My method:

22*.25*.25*1200/7=235.7142857142857143 cubic inches

235.7142857142857143/277.4193=0.8496679420439951881 imperial gallons

--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
 
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