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03 numbers

 
 
Owain
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      03-14-2007
Martin Jay wrote:
>> So what happen when Ofcom runs out of '02*' numbers for geographic
>> areas?

> That's probably not very likely. There seems to be a trend against
> using geographic numbers amongst businesses and that will probably be
> mirrored by residential users sometime.


Also, the reduction in fax lines, 2nd lines for broadband use, and
Home/Business Highway is going to release some numbers.

Owain

 
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Paul Cupis
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      03-14-2007
Adrian wrote:
> So what happen when Ofcom runs out of '02*' numbers for geographic
> areas?
>
> Let me explain: My understanding is that '01nnn' is a temporary
> measure. Eventually Wales will all become 029, Scotland will have 2
> '02*' areas and the English regions will be converted to two digit
> area codes with 8 digit numbers. However, there are not enough '02*'
> codes to cover all the English regions. One would have expected after
> using all the '02*' options that usage would overflow to take insome
> '03*' codes.
>
> Since '03*' is now going to be utilized for non geopgraphic numbers,
> from where will the new area codes for 8 digit numbers come?


I'm not sure I understand your question. You are asking what numbers
will be used when all 01 numbers have been migrated to 02 area codes? If
this is your question, surely they can just re-use the 01 numbers? If
not, can you restate your question?
 
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Paul Cupis
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      03-14-2007
Gordon Henderson wrote:
> In article <45f740e9.0@entanet>, Paul Cupis <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> pugwash wrote:
>>> I thought 03 is geographical, not VoIP. Do you mean 05?

>> 03 is non-geographical, but charged at geographic rates.

>
> And were'nt 056 numbers suppsoed to be the same way too? Whatever happened
> to them?


056 numbers are "LIECS" - Location Independant Electronic Communcations
Service. These are intended, loosely, for VoIP services, where 03
numbers are not.
 
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Paul Cupis
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      03-14-2007
Brian A wrote:
> On Wed, 14 Mar 2007 00:34:10 GMT, "{{{{{Welcome}}}}}"
> <bhx___spam@trapped___hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
> The old non-geo 0345 numbers are current 'Lo-call' aren't they ? -
> like 0845s ?


Remaining 0345 numbers were all converted to "08457" numbers in 2001.
 
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Paul Cupis
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      03-14-2007
stephen wrote:
> "Paul Cupis" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:45f740b7.0@entanet...
>> {{{{{Welcome}}}}} wrote:
>>> Are there any VoIP providers issuing numbers in the 03 range yet?

>> No, as Ofcom have not allocated any to any operators yet. Last week was
>> the initial application stage, so I'd expect numbers to become available
>> to endusers in 2-3 months.

>
> in effect - some numbers are already allocated.
>
> the Ofcom page mentions that some numbers are reserved, so that companies
> already using 08xx can get an equivalent 03 number where all they do is
> change 8 -> 3.
>
> See 1.17 in
> http://www.ofcom.org.uk/consult/cond...ing03/summary/


Well, yes. I would consider these reserved, rather than allocated.
Certainly they are not yet available to dial/acquire.

 
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Adrian
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      03-14-2007
On Mar 14, 2:13 pm, Paul Cupis <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Adrian wrote:
> > So what happen when Ofcom runs out of '02*' numbers for geographic
> > areas?

>
> > Let me explain: My understanding is that '01nnn' is a temporary
> > measure. Eventually Wales will all become 029, Scotland will have 2
> > '02*' areas and the English regions will be converted to two digit
> > area codes with 8 digit numbers. However, there are not enough '02*'
> > codes to cover all the English regions. One would have expected after
> > using all the '02*' options that usage would overflow to take insome
> > '03*' codes.

>
> > Since '03*' is now going to be utilized for non geopgraphic numbers,
> > from where will the new area codes for 8 digit numbers come?

>
> I'm not sure I understand your question. You are asking what numbers
> will be used when all 01 numbers have been migrated to 02 area codes? If
> this is your question, surely they can just re-use the 01 numbers? If
> not, can you restate your question?


Yes Paul,

Essentially, I am assuming that in the very long term "011n", "01n1",
and "01nnn" will cease to exist as the need for numbers pushes the
conversion to "02n". However, there are not quite enough
possibilities with just "02n". If "01n" is re-used I guess it will
work.

Adrian

 
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Adrian
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      03-14-2007
On Mar 14, 1:46 pm, "R. Mark Clayton" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:
> "Spin Dryer" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>
>
>
>
> > On 14 Mar 2007 09:55:45 -0700, [Adrian] said :-

>
> >>On Mar 13, 5:34 pm, "{{{{{Welcome}}}}}"
> >><bhx___spam@trapped___hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
> >>> Paul Cupis wrote:
> >>> > {{{{{Welcome}}}}} wrote:
> >>> >> Are there any VoIP providers issuing numbers in the 03 range yet?

>
> >>> > No, as Ofcom have not allocated any to any operators yet. Last week
> >>> > was the initial application stage, so I'd expect numbers to become
> >>> > available to endusers in 2-3 months.

>
> >>> Right, OK thanks!

>
> >>So what happen when Ofcom runs out of '02*' numbers for geographic
> >>areas?

>
> >>Let me explain: My understanding is that '01nnn' is a temporary
> >>measure. Eventually Wales will all become 029, Scotland will have 2
> >>'02*' areas and the English regions will be converted to two digit
> >>area codes with 8 digit numbers. However, there are not enough '02*'
> >>codes to cover all the English regions. One would have expected after
> >>using all the '02*' options that usage would overflow to take insome
> >>'03*' codes.

>
> >>Since '03*' is now going to be utilized for non geopgraphic numbers,
> >>from where will the new area codes for 8 digit numbers come?

>
> >>Adrian

>
> > What does someone posting from Nevada Power company in the US know
> > about this ? Let me tell you, absolutely nothing.

>
> Have a look at what he responded to!
>
> Well the North American Numbering Plan was devised about 60 years ago and
> whilst some new area codes have been added and the central digit of the area
> code can now be other than zero or one, it has lasted well down to today.
>
> In the UK we have had area codes based on exchange names, then all number
> and at least two major renumbering schemes for London in the last twenty
> years. Large parts of the rest of the country has been radically changed as
> well.
>
> So what does anyone in the US know about number plans - a lot more than
> anyone in the UK!


Thank you Mark,

In point of fact I grew up in an English village. My parents had a
three digit telephone number. I have had numbers in London,
Basingstoke, Bognor Regis, Bradford, Edinburgh and currently
Portsmouth. So I am used to the UK's "evolutionary" approach.

Then again I have had numbers in Louisville, Westborough,
Massachusetts, Omaha, and currently Las Vegas and Los Angeles. So I
am familiar with the North American "fixed length" approach.

Adrian

 
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Adrian
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-14-2007
On Mar 14, 1:18 pm, "stephen" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> "Paul Cupis" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in messagenews:45f740b7.0@entanet...
> > {{{{{Welcome}}}}} wrote:
> > > Are there any VoIP providers issuing numbers in the 03 range yet?

>
> > No, as Ofcom have not allocated any to any operators yet. Last week was
> > the initial application stage, so I'd expect numbers to become available
> > to endusers in 2-3 months.

>
> in effect - some numbers are already allocated.
>
> the Ofcom page mentions that some numbers are reserved, so that companies
> already using 08xx can get an equivalent 03 number where all they do is
> change 8 -> 3.
>
> See 1.17 inhttp://www.ofcom.org.uk/consult/condocs/numbering03/summary/
>
> --
> Regards
>
> (E-Mail Removed) - replace xyz with ntl


The document also confirms that Oftel are unhappy about "070" personal
numbers. Apparently they want to add price announcements. I hope my
callers are not going to be inconvenienced by the changes. I
currently route an "070" number to my US mobile. My UK contacts know
it as my mobile number. For all practical purposes it is!

Adrian


 
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Peter
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-14-2007
On Wed, 14 Mar 2007 20:48:39 +0000, Martin Jay
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:


>>Let me explain: My understanding is that '01nnn' is a temporary
>>measure. Eventually Wales will all become 029, Scotland will have 2
>>'02*' areas and the English regions will be converted to two digit
>>area codes with 8 digit numbers.

>
>IIRC this idea was mooted by OFTEL some time ago, and Northern Ireland
>already follows this system by only having one dialling code.



In fact prior to the adoption of one dialling code for NI, Wales was
consulted about having only one code - 029 - the current Cardiff code.

Nobody knows who exactly was consulted, but I know no one who was
asked - the result - no single code, no chance of only one number
change - chaos kept in reserve for the future.
--
Cheers

Peter

Please remove the invalid to reply
 
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acdeag
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      03-14-2007

"Adrian" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
> On Mar 14, 1:18 pm, "stephen" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> "Paul Cupis" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
>> messagenews:45f740b7.0@entanet...
>> > {{{{{Welcome}}}}} wrote:
>> > > Are there any VoIP providers issuing numbers in the 03 range yet?

>>
>> > No, as Ofcom have not allocated any to any operators yet. Last week was
>> > the initial application stage, so I'd expect numbers to become
>> > available
>> > to endusers in 2-3 months.

>>
>> in effect - some numbers are already allocated.
>>
>> the Ofcom page mentions that some numbers are reserved, so that companies
>> already using 08xx can get an equivalent 03 number where all they do is
>> change 8 -> 3.
>>
>> See 1.17 inhttp://www.ofcom.org.uk/consult/condocs/numbering03/summary/
>>
>> --
>> Regards
>>
>> (E-Mail Removed) - replace xyz with ntl

>
> The document also confirms that Oftel are unhappy about "070" personal
> numbers. Apparently they want to add price announcements. I hope my
> callers are not going to be inconvenienced by the changes. I
> currently route an "070" number to my US mobile. My UK contacts know
> it as my mobile number. For all practical purposes it is!
>
> Adrian
>
>


I think they will stop that as 070 numbers can cost more than calling a
mobile, and that is what they are worried about. Specifically they are
worried about people not realising the extra cost.

 
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