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Routers - wired vs. wireless?

 
 
Trash Fish
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      03-13-2007
I apologize (sorry) if this is a bad question here in any way(s) at
all, but for sharing a high-speed cable connection to the Internet
among at least 2 computers, what, if any, advantages would a wired
router have over a wireless one? I would think that price (less
expensive) would be one, but that doesn't seem to be the case. So can
anyone please tell us? It'll be appreciated - thanks.

 
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John A
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      03-13-2007

"Trash Fish" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
> I apologize (sorry) if this is a bad question here in any way(s) at
> all, but for sharing a high-speed cable connection to the Internet
> among at least 2 computers, what, if any, advantages would a wired
> router have over a wireless one? I would think that price (less
> expensive) would be one, but that doesn't seem to be the case. So can
> anyone please tell us? It'll be appreciated - thanks.
>


Wired kit is definitely cheaper. The router is cheaper, plus most PCs come
with an Ethernet connection, but a Wireless adapter will cost you about half
a router's cost again for each PC. Against that is the material cost of the
(relatively cheap) Ethernet cables AND the cost and disturbance of routing
the cabling.

Wired is more secure. I can tap into my neighbour's wireless network - but
that is their fault for not using any form of wireless security /
encryption.

Wireless is more expandable. My router supports up to 4 wired and over 250
wireless connections.

Wired can be upset by the use of other RF equipment on the premises. Yes, I
have said that the right way around! Strapping lots of equipment together
with wires means that any RF energy about is picked up in serious quantity
and can play hell with the router.

You decide.

John A


 
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Mr. Arnold
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      03-13-2007
John A wrote:

<snipped>

>
> Wireless is more expandable. My router supports up to 4 wired and over 250
> wireless connections.


That's not correct it doesn't make any difference for an all wired or
wire/wireless router as to the number of connections wired or wireless
that any router will support, which is up to 255.

If you plug a standalone hub or switch into the four LAN ports on the
router and daisy chain multiple hubs and switches together, one can
expand the wire side of the router to 255 network devices connected to it.

So, the wire/wireless router will support a combination of wire and
wireless connections up to 255 and an all wire router will do the same
for the 255 network connections.



 
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John A
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      03-13-2007

"Mr. Arnold" <"Mr. Arnold"@Arnold.COM> wrote in message
news:vKuJh.12199$(E-Mail Removed) link.net...
> John A wrote:
>
> <snipped>
>
> >
> > Wireless is more expandable. My router supports up to 4 wired and over

250
> > wireless connections.

>
> That's not correct <snip>


It is quite correct. The OP asked about a router. My response is about a
router. Your response isn't.


 
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Mr. Arnold
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      03-13-2007
Trash Fish wrote:
> I apologize (sorry) if this is a bad question here in any way(s) at
> all, but for sharing a high-speed cable connection to the Internet
> among at least 2 computers, what, if any, advantages would a wired
> router have over a wireless one? I would think that price (less
> expensive) would be one, but that doesn't seem to be the case. So can
> anyone please tell us? It'll be appreciated - thanks.
>


Well, what you should get IMHO is a packet filtering FW router that is
all wire. A packet filtering FW router is a better security measure for
the LAN that has more features to protect the LAN from the Internet.

You should get a packet filtering FW router that meets the
specifications in the link for *What does a FW do?*

http://www.vicomsoft.com/knowledge/r...irewalls1.html

You should get a FW router that does logging where you can use something
like Wallwatcher to watch for dubious connections from your network.

<http://www.ghacks.net/2005/11/14/wallwatcher-firewall-and-router-analyzer/>
<http://sonic.net/wallwatcher/>

For the wireless if you decide to use wireless, then you might want to
look at a standalone wireless access point (WAP) device and plug it into
a LAN port on the all wire FW router.

A standalone WAP device allows the wire and wireless computers to use
the router as one network with the router being the gateway to the WAN -
Wide Area Network/Internet and LAN/Local Area Network.

You should be aware of the wireless security.

http://netsecurity.about.com/cs/wire...aa112203_2.htm

Keep in mind that the security measures of the wireless on a standalone
WAP device or a wire/wireless AP router will keep out the average Job
Blow trying to hack the wireless.

However, if someone with some expertise and savvy wants to come after
the network on the wireless, it can be done.

There are wire/wireless AP routers that are packet filtering FW routers
that will meet the specs for a FW in the link above, but most will not
meet the specs.
 
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Mr. Arnold
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      03-13-2007
John A wrote:
> "Mr. Arnold" <"Mr. Arnold"@Arnold.COM> wrote in message
> news:vKuJh.12199$(E-Mail Removed) link.net...
>
>>John A wrote:
>>
>><snipped>
>>
>>>Wireless is more expandable. My router supports up to 4 wired and over

>
> 250
>
>>>wireless connections.

>>
>>That's not correct <snip>

>
>
> It is quite correct. The OP asked about a router. My response is about a
> router. Your response isn't.
>
>


The router supports 255 connections wired for an all wire router, 255 on
the wire side of a wire/wireless AP router, 255 on the wireless side of
the wire/wireless AP router and a combination of 255 wire and wireless
connections together on the wire/wireless AP router.

It's not four because there are four LAN ports on the wire/wireless AP
router and 250 on the wireless side, as you have indicated. It's any
combination of the two, wired or wireless, that can make up the 255.

A router is a router and what you have stated above makes no sense.
 
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Paul
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      03-14-2007
Trash Fish wrote:
> I apologize (sorry) if this is a bad question here in any way(s) at
> all, but for sharing a high-speed cable connection to the Internet
> among at least 2 computers, what, if any, advantages would a wired
> router have over a wireless one? I would think that price (less
> expensive) would be one, but that doesn't seem to be the case. So can
> anyone please tell us? It'll be appreciated - thanks.
>


Wireless is intended for portability (like walking about your
living room while carrying a laptop).

But wireless is also subject to propagation conditions, and
thruput is subject to the whims of the wireless Gods. For a
person living in an apartment building, surrounded by four
neighbours using Wireless N, you might get very poor performance.
If you were an "all you can eat" downloader, I'd at least
want to wire the downloader machine directly to the router.
For machines needing casual connectivity (web surfing), a
wireless connection might be OK.

Personally, I use nothing but wired routers in my house, as
the performance is predictable from day to day. And I don't
mind running wires to get the job done.

Wired routers also have fewer (not zero) security issues to
worry about, like just how exposed a wireless network is
to access from outside. All routers need careful attention
to their settings, and the wired ones simply have fewer
setup screens.

My last wired router was about $39 or so, and it works great.

Paul
 
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