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Best method For CD destruction

 
 
invntrr
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-08-2007

"Leythos" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed). ..
> In article <4690c4b8$0$8729$(E-Mail Removed)>,
> http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) says...
> > So I can definitively state that the idea is not stupid. It may not be
> > the best solution, maybe relatively labour intensive compared to
> > chemistry, but it certainly is a contender: cheap, produces minimal
> > pollution and uses readily available equipment.

>
> Since any person that has a mind for security already has a paper
> shredder the ideal way is to shred them. Many paper shredders now come
> with slots for CD's and credit cards - they work great.
>

If someone is saving to information CD that must be eventfully destroyed
.... place a Pot Pie in the Micro wave using the CD as a tray. You will give
yourself a fine meal and have a good nights sleep


 
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Rick Merrill
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      07-08-2007
Jim Watt wrote:
> On Sun, 08 Jul 2007 12:04:26 +0100, Tim Jackson
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Jim Watt wrote:
>>> On Thu, 08 Mar 2007 01:44:38 GMT, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>>>
>>>> Microwave is just plain stupid.
>>> Why?
>>> --
>>> Jim Watt
>>> http://www.gibnet.com

>> I couldn't resist this.
>>
>> The idea looks good to me so I just tried it. It works and is quick and
>> easy.
>>
>> I put the CD on a wire microwave pie rack to lift it off the metal base
>> plate and prevent screening. I put in a cup of water to protect the
>> microwave from over-voltage and to limit the power density.
>>
>> After about 15 seconds at 1kW the CD was hot, bowed, crazed and smoking
>> a bit.
>>
>> Effectiveness looks roughly equivalent to shredding into 5mm fragments.
>> Destruction is clearly visible. See http://www.tim-jackson.co.uk/cd.JPG
>>
>> It's harmless to the microwave as long as there is something there, or
>> enough CDs, to absorb any excess power, and as long as you don't make
>> too much smoke and fume. The CD absorbs a lot of power, so I guess with
>> half a dozen you'd have no risk of over-voltage or excessively rapid
>> temperature rise and can omit the water.
>>
>> You'd need some sort of (dielectric or wire) frame to support the CDs
>> far enough apart to expose them roughly equally, for doing quantity.
>>
>> So I can definitively state that the idea is not stupid. It may not be
>> the best solution, maybe relatively labour intensive compared to
>> chemistry, but it certainly is a contender: cheap, produces minimal
>> pollution and uses readily available equipment.
>>

>
> Some hints:
>
> 1. The last thing you need in there is a wire frame !
> although plastic would be fine


non-conducting "wire frames" come with most microwaves today.

>
> 2. You do not need smoke or to melt the disks the beauty
> of the idea is that a short exposure causes the total
> destruction of the metallic film in the polycarbonate
> sandwich without affecting that.
>


I'd guess, but it's not enough for military security!

> 3. I do it without the cup of water as its only for around
> three seconds burn, you see the flashover.


If you see flashover, there could be stains made to the
microwave oven.


> If you have any free AOL disks they are ideal for testing the
> method.


What a wonderful idea, you sadist!-)

> --
> Jim Watt
> http://www.gibnet.com

 
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Bart Bailey
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      07-08-2007
In Message-ID:<(E-Mail Removed)> posted on
Sun, 08 Jul 2007 14:45:25 -0400, Rick Merrill wrote: Begin

>Jim Watt wrote:
>> On Sun, 08 Jul 2007 12:04:26 +0100, Tim Jackson
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:


>>> Destruction is clearly visible. See http://www.tim-jackson.co.uk/cd.JPG


>> 2. You do not need smoke or to melt the disks the beauty
>> of the idea is that a short exposure causes the total
>> destruction of the metallic film in the polycarbonate
>> sandwich without affecting that.


>I'd guess, but it's not enough for military security!


I don't think there's enough forensic capability amongst the military
(NSA) or whomever to recover a usable bit stream from a zapped disk

I keep an old analog Westinghouse relic for just such uses and after the
first flash of 'lace lightning' occurs, (3-4 sec) no more is necessary.
There's also a terrible toxic smell that permeates the chamber,
so you wouldn't want to use your food prep oven for this purpose.

--

Bart
 
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Tim Jackson
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      07-08-2007
Jim Watt wrote:
> On Sun, 08 Jul 2007 12:04:26 +0100, Tim Jackson
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Jim Watt wrote:
>>> On Thu, 08 Mar 2007 01:44:38 GMT, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>>>
>>>> Microwave is just plain stupid.
>>> Why?
>>> --
>>> Jim Watt
>>> http://www.gibnet.com

>> I couldn't resist this.
>>
>> The idea looks good to me so I just tried it. It works and is quick and
>> easy.
>>
>> I put the CD on a wire microwave pie rack to lift it off the metal base
>> plate and prevent screening. I put in a cup of water to protect the
>> microwave from over-voltage and to limit the power density.
>>
>> After about 15 seconds at 1kW the CD was hot, bowed, crazed and smoking
>> a bit.
>>
>> Effectiveness looks roughly equivalent to shredding into 5mm fragments.
>> Destruction is clearly visible. See http://www.tim-jackson.co.uk/cd.JPG
>>
>> It's harmless to the microwave as long as there is something there, or
>> enough CDs, to absorb any excess power, and as long as you don't make
>> too much smoke and fume. The CD absorbs a lot of power, so I guess with
>> half a dozen you'd have no risk of over-voltage or excessively rapid
>> temperature rise and can omit the water.
>>
>> You'd need some sort of (dielectric or wire) frame to support the CDs
>> far enough apart to expose them roughly equally, for doing quantity.
>>
>> So I can definitively state that the idea is not stupid. It may not be
>> the best solution, maybe relatively labour intensive compared to
>> chemistry, but it certainly is a contender: cheap, produces minimal
>> pollution and uses readily available equipment.
>>

>
> Some hints:
>
> 1. The last thing you need in there is a wire frame !
> although plastic would be fine
>

The wire frame came with my microwave. I assure you it is metal and it
works fine. It is intended for heating pies and pizzas, so that
moisture is not trapped underneath. A sturdily built welded steel wire
space-frame structure does not get noticeably hot because the path
lengths are too long for eddy current losses to be significant, and it
is not a very good reflector because the gaps are larger than the
wavelength of the radiation. But it is not a good idea to build your
own unless you understand the nature of microwaves rather well.

If I laid the CD straight on the turntable (also steel) it was fairly
effectively screened and only a small patch was burnt.

> 2. You do not need smoke or to melt the disks the beauty
> of the idea is that a short exposure causes the total
> destruction of the metallic film in the polycarbonate
> sandwich without affecting that.
>

You probably don't, but any less energy and the damage wasn't very
visible. The disk didn't melt, just warped a bit (see photo). But by
the time it had crazed evenly all over there was just a little smoke and
fume from the hottest spots. It seemed to me that maximum undamaged
run-length was a fairly critical parameter in the original specification.

> 3. I do it without the cup of water as its only for around
> three seconds burn, you see the flashover.
>

Sure you do, but it stinks, and the burn tends to be localised. I had a
gone-cold cup of coffee waiting to go in next, so I didn't want to
contaminate the oven.

> If you have any free AOL disks they are ideal for testing the
> method.
>

LOL. I've got a big stack of freebies that come in junk mail. I used
some for pivot bearing washers in my custom-built reclining computer
chair too.

My favourite is the employer's CD the Revenue and Customs dept. send out
every year for tax calculation.


Tim Jackson
 
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Rick Merrill
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      07-09-2007
Bart Bailey wrote:
> In Message-ID:<(E-Mail Removed)> posted on
> Sun, 08 Jul 2007 14:45:25 -0400, Rick Merrill wrote: Begin
>
>> Jim Watt wrote:
>>> On Sun, 08 Jul 2007 12:04:26 +0100, Tim Jackson
>>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
>>>> Destruction is clearly visible. See http://www.tim-jackson.co.uk/cd.JPG

>
>>> 2. You do not need smoke or to melt the disks the beauty
>>> of the idea is that a short exposure causes the total
>>> destruction of the metallic film in the polycarbonate
>>> sandwich without affecting that.

>
>> I'd guess, but it's not enough for military security!

>
> I don't think there's enough forensic capability amongst the military
> (NSA) or whomever to recover a usable bit stream from a zapped disk


Oh, I agree with you, but can your or I convince 'them'?


> I keep an old analog Westinghouse relic for just such uses and after the
> first flash of 'lace lightning' occurs, (3-4 sec) no more is necessary.
> There's also a terrible toxic smell that permeates the chamber,
> so you wouldn't want to use your food prep oven for this purpose.


I got the same smell from a bag of popcorn I tried to reheat - only I
failed to observe that the bag was foil lined on the inside!!!


 
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Bart Bailey
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      07-09-2007
In Message-ID:<(E-Mail Removed)> posted on
Mon, 09 Jul 2007 12:04:42 -0400, Rick Merrill wrote: Begin

>> I don't think there's enough forensic capability amongst the military
>> (NSA) or whomever to recover a usable bit stream from a zapped disk

>
>Oh, I agree with you, but can your or I convince 'them'?


Better not to try,
just let them waste time until they give up on their own.
That's why any encrypted files I might have are always accompanied by a
bevy of similar size encrypted dummies to exhaust the spook's resources.

--

Bart
 
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Bob F.
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      07-09-2007
Did anyone ever try to coat the label side of a CD or DVD with paint
remover?

r. Bob F.


 
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Jim Watt
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      07-10-2007
On Sun, 08 Jul 2007 22:53:22 +0100, Tim Jackson
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:


I stick them on a plastic cup and around three seconds
destroys the data layer without any significant smell
or melting of the disk

Using acetone is going to be messy and produce hazardous
waste, and although it mixes with water its not OK to flush
it these days. Since its use in making bombs in London
buying it may arouse suspicion.

The microwave is good for casual destruction of CD's and
DVD's although the best results are with recordable media
rather than commercially 'pressed' disks.

For larger quantities a robust crosscut shredder would be
my choice.
--
Jim Watt
http://www.gibnet.com
 
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