Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Computer Support > can anyone here ballroom dance?

Reply
Thread Tools

can anyone here ballroom dance?

 
 
Brian
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-14-2006
How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
(college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the tango,
foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?

Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial for the
younger generation to learn and be able to use at some point in life, or
unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good to know' like much else in
life, what is the reality of the frequency of occurance where knowing such
dances would prove useful?


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
G. Morgan
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-14-2006
On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 10:59:48 GMT, "Brian" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
>(college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the tango,
>foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?
>
>Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial for the
>younger generation to learn and be able to use at some point in life, or
>unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good to know' like much else in
>life, what is the reality of the frequency of occurance where knowing such
>dances would prove useful?
>



It's only useful in Hawaii, in my opinion.


--

-Graham

(delete the double e's to email)
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Brian
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-14-2006
What do you mean?


"G. Morgan" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 10:59:48 GMT, "Brian" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
>>(college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the tango,
>>foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?
>>
>>Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial for the
>>younger generation to learn and be able to use at some point in life, or
>>unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good to know' like much else in
>>life, what is the reality of the frequency of occurance where knowing such
>>dances would prove useful?
>>

>
>
> It's only useful in Hawaii, in my opinion.
>
>
> --
>
> -Graham
>
> (delete the double e's to email)



 
Reply With Quote
 
samuel
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-14-2006
G. Morgan <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
news:(E-Mail Removed):

> On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 10:59:48 GMT, "Brian" <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
>>How important do you all think it is for the younger
>>generation (college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance,
>>such as the tango, foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of
>>that type?
>>
>>Is this form of dance something that would prove to be
>>beneficial for the younger generation to learn and be able to
>>use at some point in life, or unlikely? Granted it is a given
>>as being 'good to know' like much else in life, what is the
>>reality of the frequency of occurance where knowing such
>>dances would prove useful?

>
> It's only useful in Hawaii, in my opinion.


more so than hula ? <g>

 
Reply With Quote
 
Old Gringo
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-14-2006
On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 10:59:48 GMT, Brian wrote:

> How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
> (college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the tango,
> foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?
>
> Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial for the
> younger generation to learn and be able to use at some point in life, or
> unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good to know' like much else in
> life, what is the reality of the frequency of occurance where knowing such
> dances would prove useful?


"Put a little fun in your life, Try dancing." (Kathryn Murray)
http://www.arthurmurray.com/index.htm

--
Just West Of Nowhere
Enjoy Life And Live It To Its Fullest
Http://www.nuboy-industries.com
11/14/2006 6:20:16 AM CST-USA
 
Reply With Quote
 
Jack Gillis
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-14-2006
Was you question based on watching Dancing With The Stars? Here is
probably more than you want to know and it will probably bring some fire
down on me for responding to post not techology releated but here goes
anyway.

I think it is certainly desirable that youngsters if not everyone learn to
dance to some extent. However, I think the whole list of ballroom dances is
useless in the real, social world. I would teach them some sort of Swing
(West Coast, East Coat or the Carolina Shag, my favorite even though it is
not considered a ballroom dance), Waltz Cha Cha and Rumba. The basic Rumba
steps can be done to almost any kind of slower 4/4 music while staying in
one spot on the floor. The others you mention pretty much require
travelling around the floor and that is almost impossible in a social
situation. Another non-ballroom dance my wife and I use often is the Night
Club Two Step, a dance that can be done on a crowded floor to 4/4 music and
in one spot. I doubt very seriously that you would here a Tango played by a
band or a DJ unless you specifically requested it and then maybe not.

Some thing occured several years ago. We asked a band to play a Rumba.
Their response was, "We don't play that kinda music." Then we asked, "Well
how about Jimmy Buffet's Margaritavill. "Oh sure", was the reply. Great
Rumba it was.

Most dancers have their own opinon of which dances are most useful but the
above are mine and my reasons for them.

Belly Roll for Ever.

"Brian" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:Ekh6h.10701$(E-Mail Removed)...
> How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
> (college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the tango,
> foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?
>
> Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial for the
> younger generation to learn and be able to use at some point in life, or
> unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good to know' like much else in
> life, what is the reality of the frequency of occurance where knowing such
> dances would prove useful?
>



 
Reply With Quote
 
Frosty
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-14-2006
I downloaded new messages from 24hoursupport.helpdesk on Tue, 14 Nov
2006 10:59:48 GMT, and "Brian" <(E-Mail Removed)> puked this bit of
wisdom all over my shoes:

>How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
>(college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the tango,
>foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?
>
>Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial for the
>younger generation to learn and be able to use at some point in life, or
>unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good to know' like much else in
>life, what is the reality of the frequency of occurance where knowing such
>dances would prove useful?
>



Fer sure learn as many steps as possible.
You WILL get laid, and by well tuned ladies!

2
 
Reply With Quote
 
Kenny
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-14-2006
From today's Daily Mirror.

THE HEARTBEAT WALTZ
Heart attack sufferers can get better by learning to waltz, according to a
new study. Italian researchers found the dance was as effective as a
treadmill for improving circulation after cardiac problems.

--
Kenny Cargill

"Jack Gillis" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Was you question based on watching Dancing With The Stars? Here is
> probably more than you want to know and it will probably bring some fire
> down on me for responding to post not techology releated but here goes
> anyway.
>
> I think it is certainly desirable that youngsters if not everyone learn to
> dance to some extent. However, I think the whole list of ballroom dances
> is useless in the real, social world. I would teach them some sort of
> Swing (West Coast, East Coat or the Carolina Shag, my favorite even though
> it is not considered a ballroom dance), Waltz Cha Cha and Rumba. The
> basic Rumba steps can be done to almost any kind of slower 4/4 music
> while staying in one spot on the floor. The others you mention pretty
> much require travelling around the floor and that is almost impossible in
> a social situation. Another non-ballroom dance my wife and I use often is
> the Night Club Two Step, a dance that can be done on a crowded floor to
> 4/4 music and in one spot. I doubt very seriously that you would here a
> Tango played by a band or a DJ unless you specifically requested it and
> then maybe not.
>
> Some thing occured several years ago. We asked a band to play a Rumba.
> Their response was, "We don't play that kinda music." Then we asked,
> "Well how about Jimmy Buffet's Margaritavill. "Oh sure", was the reply.
> Great Rumba it was.
>
> Most dancers have their own opinon of which dances are most useful but the
> above are mine and my reasons for them.
>
> Belly Roll for Ever.
>
> "Brian" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:Ekh6h.10701$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
>> (college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the tango,
>> foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?
>>
>> Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial for the
>> younger generation to learn and be able to use at some point in life, or
>> unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good to know' like much else in
>> life, what is the reality of the frequency of occurance where knowing
>> such dances would prove useful?
>>

>
>




 
Reply With Quote
 
Tony
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-14-2006

"Jack Gillis" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Was you question based on watching Dancing With The Stars? Here is
> probably more than you want to know and it will probably bring some fire
> down on me for responding to post not techology releated but here goes
> anyway.
>
> I think it is certainly desirable that youngsters if not everyone learn to
> dance to some extent. However, I think the whole list of ballroom dances
> is useless in the real, social world. I would teach them some sort of
> Swing (West Coast, East Coat or the Carolina Shag, my favorite even though
> it is not considered a ballroom dance), Waltz Cha Cha and Rumba. The
> basic Rumba steps can be done to almost any kind of slower 4/4 music
> while staying in one spot on the floor. The others you mention pretty
> much require travelling around the floor and that is almost impossible in
> a social situation. Another non-ballroom dance my wife and I use often is
> the Night Club Two Step, a dance that can be done on a crowded floor to
> 4/4 music and in one spot. I doubt very seriously that you would here a
> Tango played by a band or a DJ unless you specifically requested it and
> then maybe not.
>
> Some thing occured several years ago. We asked a band to play a Rumba.
> Their response was, "We don't play that kinda music." Then we asked,
> "Well how about Jimmy Buffet's Margaritavill. "Oh sure", was the reply.
> Great Rumba it was.
>
> Most dancers have their own opinon of which dances are most useful but the
> above are mine and my reasons for them.
>
> Belly Roll for Ever.
>


I do a bit of DJ'ing as a hobby and find that there is a vast difference
between what DJ's consider the correct type of music to play. I do often
play "ballroom" sets but a lot depends on the clientele and age group. It
definitely requires more skill than bopping up and down to disco music which
often people don't do until they have had a few drinks.

If teaching younger people to ballroom dance would help the younger
generation learn the art of enjoying themselves without the use of copious
amounts of alcohol, then it definitely is a good idea


 
Reply With Quote
 
Mike Easter
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-14-2006
Brian wrote:
> How important do you all think it is for the younger generation
> (college-aged folk) to know how to ballroom dance, such as the tango,
> foxtrot, waltz and other popular dances of that type?
>
> Is this form of dance something that would prove to be beneficial for
> the younger generation to learn and be able to use at some point in
> life, or unlikely? Granted it is a given as being 'good to know' like
> much else in life, what is the reality of the frequency of occurance
> where knowing such dances would prove useful?


Of _course_ it is important!

How would the movie The Scent of a Woman have been without the tango
scene between Al Pacino and Gabrielle Anwar?

'Nuff said!

--
Mike Easter

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Anyone who posts for Help in Here needs Intellix - Anyone providing Help Applicable Also Ditto21 Computer Support 8 02-18-2006 04:27 AM
Can anyone tell me what software I need for this file? Here is a sample of the file...... Happy@Camper.Com Computer Support 4 03-20-2005 08:26 PM
dunno if anyone can help here - no sound in half life 2 Johnny8977 Computer Support 0 11-16-2004 09:04 PM
can anyone identify the music here Brian Computer Support 1 06-14-2004 03:07 AM
can anyone help here? sport0boy@netscape.net Firefox 6 11-28-2003 06:33 PM



Advertisments