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Computer toasted?

 
 
mike4ty4@yahoo.com
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Posts: n/a
 
      10-28-2006

(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> "pengulin" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> >Since you have had trouble turning it on - at least on occaision -- in the
> >past, did you try shorting the pins on the motherboard for the power switch?
> >You've replaced the power supply, but that doesn't mean the switch couldn't
> >be bad as well.
> >

>
> To follow up, also test the power supply and see if it works.
>
> "While we're at it, you can power up an ATX power supply by shorting
> the green wire with any black ground wire. "
> http://www.bluemax.net/techtips/ATXP...pplyWiring.htm
> --
> http://nonk.nonk.info/pages/guys_cau...staring_07.jpg


You sure that's safe? The integrated ethernet light is on, which means
the power
supply is generating a voltage. I even tried connecting the old one
which works at
least intermittently, and it still wouldn't start.

 
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Pennywise@DerryMaine.Gov
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Posts: n/a
 
      10-28-2006
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) wrote:

>
>(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>> "pengulin" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>> >Since you have had trouble turning it on - at least on occaision -- in the
>> >past, did you try shorting the pins on the motherboard for the power switch?
>> >You've replaced the power supply, but that doesn't mean the switch couldn't
>> >be bad as well.
>> >


>> To follow up, also test the power supply and see if it works.
>>
>> "While we're at it, you can power up an ATX power supply by shorting
>> the green wire with any black ground wire. "
>> http://www.bluemax.net/techtips/ATXP...pplyWiring.htm
>> --
>> http://nonk.nonk.info/pages/guys_cau...staring_07.jpg


>You sure that's safe? The integrated ethernet light is on, which means
>the power
>supply is generating a voltage. I even tried connecting the old one
>which works at
>least intermittently, and it still wouldn't start.


Ok, If I were having the trouble your having getting a computer to
work, I'll put the mother board on a piece of glass (non conductive)
hook everything up on the table (I have a glass table <G>) and see if
it works there, change things out until it does. then install it into
the case.

As for the ethernet light, there are many voltages a power supply
supplies.
--
http://nonk.nonk.info/pages/guys_cau...staring_07.jpg
 
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w_tom
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Posts: n/a
 
      10-28-2006
Well at the very start, you still have no reason to believe the
original power supply failed. Demonstrated is why we don't replace
things until first collecting facts. Two minutes with a 3.5 digital
multimeter would have condemned or exonerated the original supply.
However, having subjected the system to so much 'surgery', no one can
be sure even what the original problem was.

Did CPU overheat? I don't even see the CPU listed. It if was an
Intel CPU, then no problem.

Having changes so many things, it is now time to first establish what
is and is not working. Even an illuminated light does not report a
good supply.

Get a meter to learn what is wrong, immediately, and before replacing
anything. Solve a problem the first time. Procedures to take such
measurements were detailed previously in
microsoft.public.windowsxp.general on 7 Jun 2006 entitled "Dead
computer" at
http://tinyurl.com/qcvuq

Numbers from those measurements then mean replies will have better
credibility.

Foundation of every computer is its power supply system. Notice the
word 'system'. Power supply is only one 'system' component. Get those
numbers. In your case, first numbers from green gray wires are
important both before and after power switch is pressed.

Disturbing is a power switch tested with a battery. Without limiting
current, that battery could have harmed switch contacts. Just another
reason why computer repairing means a screwdriver and the essential 3.5
digit multimeter. In fact, that two minute test with a multimeter
would have identified switch as good - without disconnecting anything -
without adding more unknowns to the problem by moving wires. Fixing
things right the first time is not found in 'replace this, then replace
that' techniques - also called shotgunning. First collect facts
without changing anything. Takes less time. Finds and fixed the
problem a first time. Does not end up curing only symptoms. System
does not fail later due to too many changes and other human created
failures.

(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> You sure that's safe? The integrated ethernet light is on, which means
> the power
> supply is generating a voltage. I even tried connecting the old one
> which works at
> least intermittently, and it still wouldn't start.


 
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mike4ty4@yahoo.com
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-28-2006

w_tom wrote:
> Well at the very start, you still have no reason to believe the
> original power supply failed. Demonstrated is why we don't replace
> things until first collecting facts. Two minutes with a 3.5 digital
> multimeter would have condemned or exonerated the original supply.
> However, having subjected the system to so much 'surgery', no one can
> be sure even what the original problem was.
>


How would I test it with the meter? Would I have to open it up and poke
around in there, what with all that voltage? That sounds kind of
dangerous.
Would it be safe to do that? Should I risk? But replacing the original
power
supply did stop the spotaneous reboot problem, so something must have
been wrong with it.

> Did CPU overheat? I don't even see the CPU listed. It if was an
> Intel CPU, then no problem.
>


It's an Intel. No overheating problem as far as I can see. The chip
temperature was only around 118 F/48 C. Before it used to reach
130 F or more.

> Having changes so many things, it is now time to first establish what
> is and is not working. Even an illuminated light does not report a
> good supply.
>


There was not much changed ("surgery" as you call it), in fact, except
for the CPU cooler and power supply. Putting in the newer power supply
stopped the spontaneous reboot and the new cooler brought the chip
temperature down. That is ALL that was replaced.

> Get a meter to learn what is wrong, immediately, and before replacing
> anything. Solve a problem the first time. Procedures to take such
> measurements were detailed previously in
> microsoft.public.windowsxp.general on 7 Jun 2006 entitled "Dead
> computer" at
> http://tinyurl.com/qcvuq
>
> Numbers from those measurements then mean replies will have better
> credibility.
>
> Foundation of every computer is its power supply system. Notice the
> word 'system'. Power supply is only one 'system' component. Get those
> numbers. In your case, first numbers from green gray wires are
> important both before and after power switch is pressed.
>
> Disturbing is a power switch tested with a battery. Without limiting
> current, that battery could have harmed switch contacts. Just another
> reason why computer repairing means a screwdriver and the essential 3.5
> digit multimeter. In fact, that two minute test with a multimeter
> would have identified switch as good - without disconnecting anything -
> without adding more unknowns to the problem by moving wires. Fixing
> things right the first time is not found in 'replace this, then replace
> that' techniques - also called shotgunning. First collect facts
> without changing anything. Takes less time. Finds and fixed the
> problem a first time. Does not end up curing only symptoms. System
> does not fail later due to too many changes and other human created
> failures.
>


The switch was one bought at Radio Shack because the original switch
broke, several years ago, in fact. It was not a computer-specific
switch,
it was more general-purpose, and I doubt the battery would therefore
have
damaged it.

But IS IT SAFE to test the power supply in the way you describe?

> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> > You sure that's safe? The integrated ethernet light is on, which means
> > the power
> > supply is generating a voltage. I even tried connecting the old one
> > which works at
> > least intermittently, and it still wouldn't start.


 
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mike4ty4@yahoo.com
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-28-2006

(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> w_tom wrote:
> > Well at the very start, you still have no reason to believe the
> > original power supply failed. Demonstrated is why we don't replace
> > things until first collecting facts. Two minutes with a 3.5 digital
> > multimeter would have condemned or exonerated the original supply.
> > However, having subjected the system to so much 'surgery', no one can
> > be sure even what the original problem was.
> >

>
> How would I test it with the meter? Would I have to open it up and poke
> around in there, what with all that voltage? That sounds kind of
> dangerous.
> Would it be safe to do that? Should I risk? But replacing the original
> power
> supply did stop the spotaneous reboot problem, so something must have
> been wrong with it.
>
> > Did CPU overheat? I don't even see the CPU listed. It if was an
> > Intel CPU, then no problem.
> >

>
> It's an Intel. No overheating problem as far as I can see. The chip
> temperature was only around 118 F/48 C. Before it used to reach
> 130 F or more.
>


"before" = "before I installed the new cooler". Idle temp then was
around 127 F, to be more precise.

> > Having changes so many things, it is now time to first establish what
> > is and is not working. Even an illuminated light does not report a
> > good supply.
> >

>
> There was not much changed ("surgery" as you call it), in fact, except
> for the CPU cooler and power supply. Putting in the newer power supply
> stopped the spontaneous reboot and the new cooler brought the chip
> temperature down. That is ALL that was replaced.
>
> > Get a meter to learn what is wrong, immediately, and before replacing
> > anything. Solve a problem the first time. Procedures to take such
> > measurements were detailed previously in
> > microsoft.public.windowsxp.general on 7 Jun 2006 entitled "Dead
> > computer" at
> > http://tinyurl.com/qcvuq
> >
> > Numbers from those measurements then mean replies will have better
> > credibility.
> >
> > Foundation of every computer is its power supply system. Notice the
> > word 'system'. Power supply is only one 'system' component. Get those
> > numbers. In your case, first numbers from green gray wires are
> > important both before and after power switch is pressed.
> >
> > Disturbing is a power switch tested with a battery. Without limiting
> > current, that battery could have harmed switch contacts. Just another
> > reason why computer repairing means a screwdriver and the essential 3.5
> > digit multimeter. In fact, that two minute test with a multimeter
> > would have identified switch as good - without disconnecting anything -
> > without adding more unknowns to the problem by moving wires. Fixing
> > things right the first time is not found in 'replace this, then replace
> > that' techniques - also called shotgunning. First collect facts
> > without changing anything. Takes less time. Finds and fixed the
> > problem a first time. Does not end up curing only symptoms. System
> > does not fail later due to too many changes and other human created
> > failures.
> >

>
> The switch was one bought at Radio Shack because the original switch
> broke, several years ago, in fact. It was not a computer-specific
> switch,
> it was more general-purpose, and I doubt the battery would therefore
> have
> damaged it.
>
> But IS IT SAFE to test the power supply in the way you describe?
>
> > (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> > > You sure that's safe? The integrated ethernet light is on, which means
> > > the power
> > > supply is generating a voltage. I even tried connecting the old one
> > > which works at
> > > least intermittently, and it still wouldn't start.


 
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w_tom
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-28-2006
(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> ...
> But IS IT SAFE to test the power supply in the way you describe?


You performed major surgery - replaced a power supply. And now you
ask about safety? Capacitors inside a disconnected power supply can
store far more dangerous charges? Did you know voltages inside your
car battery could be more dangerous?

Your questions were answered in the previous post that included
pictures and this link http://tinyurl.com/qcvuq . You did major
surgery. You disconnected wires. Such surgery is not necessary in
posted procedure / pictures AND such can cause changes that either
masks a problem or that exponentially complicate the problem. Simply
disconnecting and reconnecting the power supply connector could have
eliminated (temporarily) those reboots and not solved the problem.

How would a meter find the problem? Return to and read the earlier
post that stated exact how and why the meter does its job. Why did you
not even view the pictures? Earlier post answered your questions.

Meanwhile, it could not overheat with heatsink ajar. Overheating
would have been likely - and occurred so fast that temperature would
not be noted fast enough. Your numbers only confirm what we knew
happened when you said, "Intel".

 
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A Colored Guy
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-28-2006
I downloaded new messages from 24hoursupport.helpdesk on 28 Oct 2006
03:46:15 -0700, and "w_tom" <(E-Mail Removed)> vomited forth this bit
of wisdom :

>(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>> ...
>> But IS IT SAFE to test the power supply in the way you describe?

>
> You performed major surgery - replaced a power supply. And now you
>ask about safety? Capacitors inside a disconnected power supply can
>store far more dangerous charges? Did you know voltages inside your
>car battery could be more dangerous?
>
> Your questions were answered in the previous post that included
>pictures and this link http://tinyurl.com/qcvuq . You did major
>surgery. You disconnected wires. Such surgery is not necessary in
>posted procedure / pictures AND such can cause changes that either
>masks a problem or that exponentially complicate the problem. Simply
>disconnecting and reconnecting the power supply connector could have
>eliminated (temporarily) those reboots and not solved the problem.
>
> How would a meter find the problem? Return to and read the earlier
>post that stated exact how and why the meter does its job. Why did you
>not even view the pictures? Earlier post answered your questions.
>
> Meanwhile, it could not overheat with heatsink ajar. Overheating
>would have been likely - and occurred so fast that temperature would
>not be noted fast enough. Your numbers only confirm what we knew
>happened when you said, "Intel".


I still think it was his power cord.
 
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mike4ty4@yahoo.com
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-28-2006

w_tom wrote:
> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> > ...
> > But IS IT SAFE to test the power supply in the way you describe?

>
> You performed major surgery - replaced a power supply. And now you
> ask about safety? Capacitors inside a disconnected power supply can
> store far more dangerous charges? Did you know voltages inside your
> car battery could be more dangerous?
>


Well OK, I'll try it. I read the website.

> Your questions were answered in the previous post that included
> pictures and this link http://tinyurl.com/qcvuq . You did major
> surgery. You disconnected wires. Such surgery is not necessary in
> posted procedure / pictures AND such can cause changes that either
> masks a problem or that exponentially complicate the problem. Simply
> disconnecting and reconnecting the power supply connector could have
> eliminated (temporarily) those reboots and not solved the problem.
>
> How would a meter find the problem? Return to and read the earlier
> post that stated exact how and why the meter does its job. Why did you
> not even view the pictures? Earlier post answered your questions.
>
> Meanwhile, it could not overheat with heatsink ajar. Overheating
> would have been likely - and occurred so fast that temperature would
> not be noted fast enough. Your numbers only confirm what we knew
> happened when you said, "Intel".


What could overheat? The CPU? The heatsink was properly fastened and
the cooler working.

 
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Larry Crites
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-28-2006
You know, if you have to ask that question , you don't know what you're
doing and need to take your computer to a shop.

Larry
Behold Beware Believe

<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ps.com...
>
>>

>
> How would I test it with the meter? Would I have to open it up and poke
> around in there, what with all that voltage? That sounds kind of
> dangerous.
> Would it be safe to do that? Should I risk? But replacing the original
> power
> supply did stop the spotaneous reboot problem, so something must have
> been wrong with it.
>




--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

 
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Shel-hed
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-28-2006
On 28 Oct 2006 11:28:56 -0700, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:


>Well OK, I'll try it. I read the website.


You are being trolled. Or this guy is a moron.
Generally speaking, the more evangelistic or demeaning they are, the more likely
they are suffering from a huge personality disorder.

 
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