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Motherboard instalation

 
 
Toolman Tim
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      07-19-2006
Dan Evans wrote:
> "Name" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed) et...
>
>> As another poster mentioned the metal screw goes into the metal post
>> that screws into the metal case. Therefore all are earthed.

>
> I just did a few continuity tests on a couple three actually) of
> boards, just for giggles. So far, I haven't got a tone between the
> area where the screw head touches, and any other area. At all. On any
> board. With *any* of the holes.
>
> Boards tested:
> QDI Platinix 2PE/800 serial 38069081
> Asus CUV4XM serial 052018-M6PC21-A01-00338
> Biostar M7NCD serial 3003K33970242
>
> A good selection of age/manufacturer, I think you'll agree.
>
> Please could someone *please* tell me how the motherboard earths with
> no electrical continuity, 'cos I'm dying to know.
>

Youmight want to check your meter then. Every board I've ever checked (and I
just checked some more just now) has continuity between all mounting hole
circuit board traces and the other grounding points of the board.

--
When I was a child, I remember my Mom telling me, "Son, when you grow
up, you can marry any girl you please." When I became a young man, I
learned the sad fact was that I could not please any of them.


 
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Paul
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      07-19-2006
Dan Evans wrote:

>
> "Name" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed) et...
>
>> As another poster mentioned the metal screw goes into the metal post that
>> screws into the metal case. Therefore all are earthed.

>
> I just did a few continuity tests on a couple three actually) of boards,
> just for giggles. So far, I haven't got a tone between the area where the
> screw head touches, and any other area. At all. On any board. With *any*
> of the holes.
>
> Boards tested:
> QDI Platinix 2PE/800 serial 38069081
> Asus CUV4XM serial 052018-M6PC21-A01-00338
> Biostar M7NCD serial 3003K33970242
>
> A good selection of age/manufacturer, I think you'll agree.
>
> Please could someone *please* tell me how the motherboard earths with no
> electrical continuity, 'cos I'm dying to know.
>
> Dan



Check between the holes and the earth on the power connector - you'll
generally find that there's a connection between one or more of the
mounting holes and earth.

It'll be *very* unusual if all the mounting holes are isolated (not that it
would matter either way, the case is earthed through the power supply, and
the motherboard is earthed through the power connector anyway).


 
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Fat Lazy Slag
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      07-19-2006
Sarah Jayne Balfour as "Margolotta" <(E-Mail Removed)>
bullshitted in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) s-media.phx...


>>> I've done it at least a
>>> dozen times without problems.


You've done it a dozen times have you fatty?
But in the mac group only six weeks ago,
In a thread displaying your obssessiveness
as to why your burner was running slow,
you admitted you had never performed
any type of hardware change/install.....

>>
>> I'll bet you haven't.
>>
>> Dan
>>

>
> Then you lose, bucko. This is the way I was taught to do it by a friend
> who
> runs his own company building PCs and, if it didn't work that way, his
> company wouldn't have just celebrated its 15th anniversary, now would it?
>


You live in a complete fantasy world,
you haven't got a clue.


 
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Whiskers
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      07-19-2006
On 2006-07-19, Paul <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Dan Evans wrote:
>
>> The mounting holes are isolated from everything else.
>>

>
> I'd get yourself a multimeter and check that before making stupid
> statements.


I'd try to work out the difference between 'static' and 'current'
electricity. Ever got a spark off a door-handle after walking across a
nylon carpet in your rubber-soled shoes? You do not want your
circuit-board to have a different 'static charge' from the case.

--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
 
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Paul
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      07-19-2006
Whiskers wrote:

> On 2006-07-19, Paul <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> Dan Evans wrote:
>>
>>> The mounting holes are isolated from everything else.
>>>

>>
>> I'd get yourself a multimeter and check that before making stupid
>> statements.

>
> I'd try to work out the difference between 'static' and 'current'
> electricity. Ever got a spark off a door-handle after walking across a
> nylon carpet in your rubber-soled shoes? You do not want your
> circuit-board to have a different 'static charge' from the case.
>


?????
 
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Whiskers
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      07-19-2006
On 2006-07-19, Paul <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Whiskers wrote:
>
>> On 2006-07-19, Paul <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> Dan Evans wrote:
>>>
>>>> The mounting holes are isolated from everything else.
>>>>
>>>
>>> I'd get yourself a multimeter and check that before making stupid
>>> statements.

>>
>> I'd try to work out the difference between 'static' and 'current'
>> electricity. Ever got a spark off a door-handle after walking across a
>> nylon carpet in your rubber-soled shoes? You do not want your
>> circuit-board to have a different 'static charge' from the case.
>>

>
> ?????


<http://www.sciencemadesimple.com/static.html>.

Insulating materials, such as circuit boards, can hold substantial 'static
charges'; conducting materials, such as metal screws and bolts, let the
electrons move freely and harmlessly so that no 'static' can build up.
Otherwise the gap between the circuit board and the case could become a
very large and unpredictable capacitor.

--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
 
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Paul
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      07-19-2006
Whiskers wrote:

> On 2006-07-19, Paul <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> Whiskers wrote:
>>
>>> On 2006-07-19, Paul <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>> Dan Evans wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> The mounting holes are isolated from everything else.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> I'd get yourself a multimeter and check that before making stupid
>>>> statements.
>>>
>>> I'd try to work out the difference between 'static' and 'current'
>>> electricity. Ever got a spark off a door-handle after walking across a
>>> nylon carpet in your rubber-soled shoes? You do not want your
>>> circuit-board to have a different 'static charge' from the case.
>>>

>>
>> ?????

>
> <http://www.sciencemadesimple.com/static.html>.
>
> Insulating materials, such as circuit boards, can hold substantial 'static
> charges'; conducting materials, such as metal screws and bolts, let the
> electrons move freely and harmlessly so that no 'static' can build up.
> Otherwise the gap between the circuit board and the case could become a
> very large and unpredictable capacitor.
>


Yes. That's exactly why the mounting holes are connected to earth, both
internally through layers in the circuit board, and externally through the
case.


 
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Whiskers
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      07-19-2006
On 2006-07-19, Paul <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Whiskers wrote:
>
>> On 2006-07-19, Paul <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> Whiskers wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 2006-07-19, Paul <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>> Dan Evans wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> The mounting holes are isolated from everything else.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> I'd get yourself a multimeter and check that before making stupid
>>>>> statements.
>>>>
>>>> I'd try to work out the difference between 'static' and 'current'
>>>> electricity. Ever got a spark off a door-handle after walking across a
>>>> nylon carpet in your rubber-soled shoes? You do not want your
>>>> circuit-board to have a different 'static charge' from the case.
>>>>
>>>
>>> ?????

>>
>> <http://www.sciencemadesimple.com/static.html>.
>>
>> Insulating materials, such as circuit boards, can hold substantial 'static
>> charges'; conducting materials, such as metal screws and bolts, let the
>> electrons move freely and harmlessly so that no 'static' can build up.
>> Otherwise the gap between the circuit board and the case could become a
>> very large and unpredictable capacitor.
>>

>
> Yes. That's exactly why the mounting holes are connected to earth, both
> internally through layers in the circuit board, and externally through the
> case.


As far as I'm aware, there are no conducting layers within a PCB; the only
conducting part is the 'tracks' on one or both surfaces. The boards
themselves are usually made of resin reinforced with glass fibre or paper.
If a conducting track is designed to make contact with one of the screws
or studs used for mounting the board into a case or rack, that would be
for purposes of the electronic circuit, not for coping with 'static'. I
don't think such a design would be a good idea though, unless the designer
could be certain that such a contact would in fact be made in the
assembled machine - and made with whatever it is the designer intended.

If the designer wants an 'earth' connection then a suitable terminal or
'plug and socket' arrangement should be used, with instructions that a
suitable 'earth' be provided when installing the board - you shouldn't
depend on the board being mounted on a metal frame or 'chassis', or on
any particular 'mounting hole' being used. None of that is related to
preventing 'static discharges' between the PCB and whatever it is mounted
to or in (which is not necessarily made of electrically conducting
material or connected to 'earth' in any way).

--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
 
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Toolman Tim
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-19-2006
Whiskers wrote:
> On 2006-07-19, Paul <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> Whiskers wrote:
>>
>>> On 2006-07-19, Paul <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>> Whiskers wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> On 2006-07-19, Paul <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>>> Dan Evans wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> The mounting holes are isolated from everything else.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I'd get yourself a multimeter and check that before making stupid
>>>>>> statements.
>>>>>
>>>>> I'd try to work out the difference between 'static' and 'current'
>>>>> electricity. Ever got a spark off a door-handle after walking
>>>>> across a nylon carpet in your rubber-soled shoes? You do not
>>>>> want your circuit-board to have a different 'static charge' from
>>>>> the case.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> ?????
>>>
>>> <http://www.sciencemadesimple.com/static.html>.
>>>
>>> Insulating materials, such as circuit boards, can hold substantial
>>> 'static charges'; conducting materials, such as metal screws and
>>> bolts, let the electrons move freely and harmlessly so that no
>>> 'static' can build up. Otherwise the gap between the circuit board
>>> and the case could become a very large and unpredictable capacitor.
>>>

>>
>> Yes. That's exactly why the mounting holes are connected to earth,
>> both internally through layers in the circuit board, and externally
>> through the case.

>
> As far as I'm aware, there are no conducting layers within a PCB; the
> only conducting part is the 'tracks' on one or both surfaces.


Look again. There are MANY layers in modern printed circuit boards with
pleny of other traces. Just do a quick search on Google for 'multilayer pcb"
and you'll get a hint.


> The
> boards themselves are usually made of resin reinforced with glass
> fibre or paper. If a conducting track is designed to make contact
> with one of the screws or studs used for mounting the board into a
> case or rack, that would be for purposes of the electronic circuit,
> not for coping with 'static'. I don't think such a design would be a
> good idea though, unless the designer could be certain that such a
> contact would in fact be made in the assembled machine - and made
> with whatever it is the designer intended.
>
> If the designer wants an 'earth' connection then a suitable terminal
> or 'plug and socket' arrangement should be used, with instructions
> that a suitable 'earth' be provided when installing the board - you
> shouldn't depend on the board being mounted on a metal frame or
> 'chassis', or on any particular 'mounting hole' being used. None of
> that is related to preventing 'static discharges' between the PCB and
> whatever it is mounted to or in (which is not necessarily made of
> electrically conducting material or connected to 'earth' in any way).


Typically the motherboards include grounding connections at the installation
holes, but the power supply ground requires chassis/earth/ground by design
specifications. The PS ground lead to the motherboard would then include the
earth contact even in the odd installation where the case was all plastic or
for whatever other reason the motherboard was not grounded/earthed through
the mounting holes.

--
When I was a child, I remember my Mom telling me, "Son, when you grow
up, you can marry any girl you please." When I became a young man, I
learned the sad fact was that I could not please any of them.


 
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Jimchip
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-19-2006
On 2006-07-19, Toolman Tim <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Whiskers wrote:

[snip]
>> As far as I'm aware, there are no conducting layers within a PCB; the
>> only conducting part is the 'tracks' on one or both surfaces.

>
> Look again. There are MANY layers in modern printed circuit boards with
> pleny of other traces. Just do a quick search on Google for 'multilayer pcb"
> and you'll get a hint.


http://www.expresspcb.com/ will make custom 2 or 4 layer boards at
around 3 boards for $50.

[snip]

--
Deliberation, n.:
The act of examining one's bread to determine which side it is
buttered on.
-- Ambrose Bierce, "The Devil's Dictionary"
 
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