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Question about traffic tickets

 
 
rogacasa@gmail.com
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      06-18-2006
Hi. The other day, I was stopped in my car by the police and given
what's called a "civil infraction" for having a burned out passenger
side brake light. I have 14 days to get it fixed and to go to the
station to provide proof that it is fixed. As I understand it, the
civil infraction will then be closed.

I have a few questions:

Where are civil infractions recorded?

How long do they stay on the record?

Does this get reported to my car insurance provider?

Will it make my insurance go up?


Thanks,
Roger Carlson

 
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Toolman Tim
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      06-18-2006
In news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com,
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) spewed forth:
> Hi. The other day, I was stopped in my car by the police and given
> what's called a "civil infraction" for having a burned out passenger
> side brake light. I have 14 days to get it fixed and to go to the
> station to provide proof that it is fixed. As I understand it, the
> civil infraction will then be closed.
>
> I have a few questions:
>
> Where are civil infractions recorded?


Who cares?

> How long do they stay on the record?


They don't, unless you don't get it fixed. Then you have a problem.

> Does this get reported to my car insurance provider?


No - why would they? It's NOT a ticket.

> Will it make my insurance go up?


Only if it doesn't get taken care of and they come looking for you...


Of course, my answers only apply where I live: YMMV.

--
I have CDO. It's like Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, only in
alphabetical order, just like it should be.


 
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Plato
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      06-18-2006
(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>
> Hi. The other day, I was stopped in my car by the police and given
> what's called a "civil infraction" for having a burned out passenger
> side brake light. I have 14 days to get it fixed and to go to the
> station to provide proof that it is fixed. As I understand it, the
> civil infraction will then be closed.
> I have a few questions:
> Where are civil infractions recorded?
> How long do they stay on the record?
> Does this get reported to my car insurance provider?


Replace your brake light, go to the station, all done.


--
http://www.bootdisk.com/

 
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amstaffs@home.com
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      06-18-2006
(E-Mail Removed) quipped:

>Hi. The other day, I was stopped in my car by the police and given
>what's called a "civil infraction" for having a burned out passenger
>side brake light. I have 14 days to get it fixed and to go to the
>station to provide proof that it is fixed. As I understand it, the
>civil infraction will then be closed.
>
>I have a few questions:
>
>Where are civil infractions recorded?


...they're not, unless you don't get the car fixed. Then it's recorded
as a non-moving violation. Like a defective equipment violation on
your record.

>
>How long do they stay on the record?


...*if* you don't comply and it gets on your record, 3-5 years
,depending on your states motor vehicle code.

>
>Does this get reported to my car insurance provider?


...only if you don't get it fixed.

>
>Will it make my insurance go up?


...depends on your insurance company. Some insurance companies
could care less about non-moving violations. Others take anything
negative on your driving record as a ding and excuse to raise your
rates.

Just get the brake light fixed and provide proof. If you do that, no
one but you will ever know that you were ever stopped.




>
>
>Thanks,
>Roger Carlson

 
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Plato
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      06-18-2006
I took my daughters car for inspection at a state facility. It failed
for NO break lights whatsoever. They gave me a 48 hour "pass" to get it
fixed. And yes, it came with a 48 hour inspection sticker. I must admit
they were right, as one "should" have brake lights working.

 
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Mike Easter
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      06-18-2006
(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> The other day, I was stopped in my car by the police and given
> what's called a "civil infraction" for having a burned out passenger
> side brake light.


We call that a 'fixit ticket'.

> I have 14 days to get it fixed and to go to the
> station to provide proof that it is fixed.


Yep.

> As I understand it, the
> civil infraction will then be closed.


That's the way it is around here. It goes away.

> I have a few questions:
>
> Where are civil infractions recorded?


You didn't even say what planet you are on - or country - or state - or
city - or county - or what jurisdiction was the officer who gave you the
ticket -- and you want to know where it is recorded? Doh.

It would become recorded in the jurisdictional entity of the officer who
issued the ticket. Look at your ticket. If you fail to remedy and
prove you have remedied the violation, then you have broken a law and
then there are consequences ranging from having to mail in a fine to
having to appear before a judge for the violation. It is much better to
fix the problem and show it to a cop at a local cop facility. Around
here, the local police have little storefront operations just for such
issues.

> How long do they stay on the record?


Usually if you keep it off the record it isn't on the record.

> Does this get reported to my car insurance provider?


Usually if you let a 'forgiveable' infraction turn into a real
violation, then it gets reported to the state which issues your DL.
Some states only keep track of moving violations like speeding. Not
mechanicals.

> Will it make my insurance go up?


Your insco has its own rules about good driver discounts and what you
have to do to lose the discount. Typically a single ticket for a
mechanical violation even one which turned into a real ticket because it
was ignored instead of going away because it was remedied -- isn't going
to have an impact on your ins rates.

The best thing to do is to fix the light and get the mechanical
violation to just go away. If you ignore something like that and its
derivatives thoroughly enough, you can end up with a warrant for your
arrest being issued.


--
Mike Easter

 
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Blinky the Shark
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      06-18-2006
Plato wrote:

> I took my daughters car for inspection at a state facility. It failed
> for NO break lights whatsoever.


That's why they were "break lights".

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Blinky RLU 297263
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Blinky the Shark
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      06-18-2006
(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> (E-Mail Removed) quipped:
>
>>Hi. The other day, I was stopped in my car by the police and given
>>what's called a "civil infraction" for having a burned out passenger
>>side brake light. I have 14 days to get it fixed and to go to the
>>station to provide proof that it is fixed. As I understand it, the
>>civil infraction will then be closed.
>>
>>I have a few questions:
>>
>>Where are civil infractions recorded?

>
> ..they're not, unless you don't get the car fixed. Then it's recorded
> as a non-moving violation. Like a defective equipment violation on
> your record.
>
>>
>>How long do they stay on the record?

>
> ..*if* you don't comply and it gets on your record, 3-5 years
> ,depending on your states motor vehicle code.
>
>>
>>Does this get reported to my car insurance provider?

>
> ..only if you don't get it fixed.
>
>>
>>Will it make my insurance go up?

>
> ..depends on your insurance company. Some insurance companies could
> care less about non-moving violations. Others take anything


Seems they might, as insurers, be interested in *safety* violations --
brake lights aren't the same as, say, a noisy muffler.


--
Blinky RLU 297263
Killing all posts from Google Groups
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Coming Soon: Filtering rules specific to various real news clients
 
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Wereo_SUPREMACY
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      06-18-2006

Mike Easter wrote:
> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> > The other day, I was stopped in my car by the police and given
> > what's called a "civil infraction" for having a burned out passenger
> > side brake light.

>
> We call that a 'fixit ticket'.
>
> > I have 14 days to get it fixed and to go to the
> > station to provide proof that it is fixed.

>
> Yep.
>
> > As I understand it, the
> > civil infraction will then be closed.

>
> That's the way it is around here. It goes away.
>
> > I have a few questions:
> >
> > Where are civil infractions recorded?

>
> You didn't even say what planet you are on - or country - or state - or
> city - or county - or what jurisdiction was the officer who gave you the
> ticket -- and you want to know where it is recorded? Doh.
>
> It would become recorded in the jurisdictional entity of the officer who
> issued the ticket. Look at your ticket. If you fail to remedy and
> prove you have remedied the violation, then you have broken a law and
> then there are consequences ranging from having to mail in a fine to
> having to appear before a judge for the violation. It is much better to
> fix the problem and show it to a cop at a local cop facility. Around
> here, the local police have little storefront operations just for such
> issues.
>
> > How long do they stay on the record?

>
> Usually if you keep it off the record it isn't on the record.
>
> > Does this get reported to my car insurance provider?

>
> Usually if you let a 'forgiveable' infraction turn into a real
> violation, then it gets reported to the state which issues your DL.
> Some states only keep track of moving violations like speeding. Not
> mechanicals.
>
> > Will it make my insurance go up?

>
> Your insco has its own rules about good driver discounts and what you
> have to do to lose the discount. Typically a single ticket for a
> mechanical violation even one which turned into a real ticket because it
> was ignored instead of going away because it was remedied -- isn't going
> to have an impact on your ins rates.
>
> The best thing to do is to fix the light and get the mechanical
> violation to just go away. If you ignore something like that and its
> derivatives thoroughly enough, you can end up with a warrant for your
> arrest being issued.
>
>
> --
> Mike Easter

The absurdity of this whole thread is I thought this is a computer
repair newsgroup.

 
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Oldus Fartus
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      06-18-2006
Wereo_SUPREMACY wrote:

> The absurdity of this whole thread is I thought this is a computer
> repair newsgroup.
>


You thought wrong.

--
Cheers
Oldus Fartus
 
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