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Dell Dimension P/S

 
 
Charlie Bress
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      05-08-2006
I am working on a Dell 2350. The original p/s appears to be dead.
I have an ATX p/s that will power up the box. I have nothing attached as
yet. No keyboard, mouse monitor etc. Just looking for life. The fans come
on. It is alive.

I am aware that Dell uses a nonstandard pinout. The pinout on the main power
connector matches up with my list of outputs for a standard ATX. There is
one extra connector that Dell uses. It brings 12 volt power to the mobo.
What is the purpose of this 12v line?
Will I create a problem by powering up the whole system to see if the
peripheral stuff works before I spring for the right replacement?

Is it feasible to simply splice this "extra" connector into the lines from
the main connector and use the p/s on hand?

Charlie


 
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Toolman Tim
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Posts: n/a
 
      05-09-2006
In news:(E-Mail Removed),
Charlie Bress spewed forth:
> I am working on a Dell 2350. The original p/s appears to be dead.
> I have an ATX p/s that will power up the box. I have nothing attached
> as yet. No keyboard, mouse monitor etc. Just looking for life. The
> fans come on. It is alive.
>
> I am aware that Dell uses a nonstandard pinout. The pinout on the
> main power connector matches up with my list of outputs for a
> standard ATX. There is one extra connector that Dell uses. It brings
> 12 volt power to the mobo. What is the purpose of this 12v line?
> Will I create a problem by powering up the whole system to see if the
> peripheral stuff works before I spring for the right replacement?
>
> Is it feasible to simply splice this "extra" connector into the lines
> from the main connector and use the p/s on hand?
>
> Charlie


Try this: http://www.endpcnoise.com/cgi-bin/e/...=dellconverter

It has a picture. If that's the problem you have, then yes, you can probably
make your own adapter. But you'd better really REALLY do your research
first. Try here:
http://www.quepublishing.com/article...&seqNum=4&rl=1

If that ISN'T what you're talking about, you may be seeing the P4 power
supply plug required by most newer motherboards, and supplied by most newer
power supplies. That is covered in the same article as above.

--
Whenever I feel blue, I start breathing again.


 
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Charlie Bress
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-09-2006

"Toolman Tim" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:4LR7g.46$(E-Mail Removed)...
> In news:(E-Mail Removed),
> Charlie Bress spewed forth:
> > I am working on a Dell 2350. The original p/s appears to be dead.
> > I have an ATX p/s that will power up the box. I have nothing attached
> > as yet. No keyboard, mouse monitor etc. Just looking for life. The
> > fans come on. It is alive.
> >
> > I am aware that Dell uses a nonstandard pinout. The pinout on the
> > main power connector matches up with my list of outputs for a
> > standard ATX. There is one extra connector that Dell uses. It brings
> > 12 volt power to the mobo. What is the purpose of this 12v line?
> > Will I create a problem by powering up the whole system to see if the
> > peripheral stuff works before I spring for the right replacement?
> >
> > Is it feasible to simply splice this "extra" connector into the lines
> > from the main connector and use the p/s on hand?
> >
> > Charlie

>
> Try this: http://www.endpcnoise.com/cgi-bin/e/...=dellconverter
>
> It has a picture. If that's the problem you have, then yes, you can

probably
> make your own adapter. But you'd better really REALLY do your research
> first. Try here:
> http://www.quepublishing.com/article...&seqNum=4&rl=1
>
> If that ISN'T what you're talking about, you may be seeing the P4 power
> supply plug required by most newer motherboards, and supplied by most

newer
> power supplies. That is covered in the same article as above.
>
> --
> Whenever I feel blue, I start breathing again.
>



Looking at the refernce you posted, I found the following information.

"If you are replacing your motherboard with a new one that requires the
ATX12V connection for the CPU voltage regulator, and yet your existing power
supply doesn't have that connector, an easy solution is available. Merely
convert one of the peripheral power connectors to an ATX12V type. PC Power
and Cooling has released just such an adapter that can instantly make any
standard ATX power supply into one with an ATX12V connector. The issue is
not whether the power supply can generate the necessary 12v-that has always
been available via the peripheral connectors."

That is essentially what I have. he supply I have is an old on that was
cannabilized from a junker. The mobo in the Dell is only about 2 years old.
So I will just grab an extra power connector and use the 12 volt connector
from the dead supply. The pin outs for the main connector do not show a
discrepancy.

Charlie


 
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Toolman Tim
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-09-2006
In news:(E-Mail Removed),
Charlie Bress spewed forth:
> "Toolman Tim" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:4LR7g.46$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> In news:(E-Mail Removed),
>> Charlie Bress spewed forth:
>>> I am working on a Dell 2350. The original p/s appears to be dead.
>>> I have an ATX p/s that will power up the box. I have nothing
>>> attached as yet. No keyboard, mouse monitor etc. Just looking for
>>> life. The fans come on. It is alive.
>>>
>>> I am aware that Dell uses a nonstandard pinout. The pinout on the
>>> main power connector matches up with my list of outputs for a
>>> standard ATX. There is one extra connector that Dell uses. It
>>> brings 12 volt power to the mobo. What is the purpose of this 12v
>>> line? Will I create a problem by powering up the whole system to
>>> see if the peripheral stuff works before I spring for the right
>>> replacement?
>>>
>>> Is it feasible to simply splice this "extra" connector into the
>>> lines from the main connector and use the p/s on hand?
>>>
>>> Charlie

>>
>> Try this: http://www.endpcnoise.com/cgi-bin/e/...=dellconverter
>>
>> It has a picture. If that's the problem you have, then yes, you can
>> probably make your own adapter. But you'd better really REALLY do
>> your research first. Try here:
>> http://www.quepublishing.com/article...&seqNum=4&rl=1
>>
>> If that ISN'T what you're talking about, you may be seeing the P4
>> power supply plug required by most newer motherboards, and supplied
>> by most newer power supplies. That is covered in the same article as
>> above.
>>
>> --
>> Whenever I feel blue, I start breathing again.
>>

>
>
> Looking at the refernce you posted, I found the following information.
>
> "If you are replacing your motherboard with a new one that requires
> the ATX12V connection for the CPU voltage regulator, and yet your
> existing power supply doesn't have that connector, an easy solution
> is available. Merely convert one of the peripheral power connectors
> to an ATX12V type. PC Power and Cooling has released just such an
> adapter that can instantly make any standard ATX power supply into
> one with an ATX12V connector. The issue is not whether the power
> supply can generate the necessary 12v-that has always been available
> via the peripheral connectors."
>
> That is essentially what I have. he supply I have is an old on that
> was cannabilized from a junker. The mobo in the Dell is only about 2
> years old. So I will just grab an extra power connector and use the
> 12 volt connector from the dead supply. The pin outs for the main
> connector do not show a discrepancy.
>
> Charlie


My thoughts exactly. But since there have been several changes in the last
few years to power supply connectors (the newest being the addition of SATA
connectors) I thought the picture and good descriptions would be helpful.

Just remember: at the relatively small cost of a new power supply, if you
aren't certain you can do the job correctly the FIRST time, think twice
about just buying a new one. The cost of replacing a CPU or motherboard (or
both) or even more parts because of a botched power connection far outweighs
the savings involved.

--
Whenever I feel blue, I start breathing again.


 
Reply With Quote
 
Charlie Bress
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-09-2006

"Toolman Tim" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:YxS7g.372$(E-Mail Removed)...
> In news:(E-Mail Removed),
> Charlie Bress spewed forth:
>> "Toolman Tim" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:4LR7g.46$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>> In news:(E-Mail Removed),
>>> Charlie Bress spewed forth:
>>>> I am working on a Dell 2350. The original p/s appears to be dead.
>>>> I have an ATX p/s that will power up the box. I have nothing
>>>> attached as yet. No keyboard, mouse monitor etc. Just looking for
>>>> life. The fans come on. It is alive.
>>>>
>>>> I am aware that Dell uses a nonstandard pinout. The pinout on the
>>>> main power connector matches up with my list of outputs for a
>>>> standard ATX. There is one extra connector that Dell uses. It
>>>> brings 12 volt power to the mobo. What is the purpose of this 12v
>>>> line? Will I create a problem by powering up the whole system to
>>>> see if the peripheral stuff works before I spring for the right
>>>> replacement?
>>>>
>>>> Is it feasible to simply splice this "extra" connector into the
>>>> lines from the main connector and use the p/s on hand?
>>>>
>>>> Charlie
>>>
>>> Try this: http://www.endpcnoise.com/cgi-bin/e/...=dellconverter
>>>
>>> It has a picture. If that's the problem you have, then yes, you can
>>> probably make your own adapter. But you'd better really REALLY do
>>> your research first. Try here:
>>> http://www.quepublishing.com/article...&seqNum=4&rl=1
>>>
>>> If that ISN'T what you're talking about, you may be seeing the P4
>>> power supply plug required by most newer motherboards, and supplied
>>> by most newer power supplies. That is covered in the same article as
>>> above.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Whenever I feel blue, I start breathing again.
>>>

>>
>>
>> Looking at the refernce you posted, I found the following information.
>>
>> "If you are replacing your motherboard with a new one that requires
>> the ATX12V connection for the CPU voltage regulator, and yet your
>> existing power supply doesn't have that connector, an easy solution
>> is available. Merely convert one of the peripheral power connectors
>> to an ATX12V type. PC Power and Cooling has released just such an
>> adapter that can instantly make any standard ATX power supply into
>> one with an ATX12V connector. The issue is not whether the power
>> supply can generate the necessary 12v-that has always been available
>> via the peripheral connectors."
>>
>> That is essentially what I have. he supply I have is an old on that
>> was cannabilized from a junker. The mobo in the Dell is only about 2
>> years old. So I will just grab an extra power connector and use the
>> 12 volt connector from the dead supply. The pin outs for the main
>> connector do not show a discrepancy.
>>
>> Charlie

>
> My thoughts exactly. But since there have been several changes in the last
> few years to power supply connectors (the newest being the addition of
> SATA connectors) I thought the picture and good descriptions would be
> helpful.
>
> Just remember: at the relatively small cost of a new power supply, if you
> aren't certain you can do the job correctly the FIRST time, think twice
> about just buying a new one. The cost of replacing a CPU or motherboard
> (or both) or even more parts because of a botched power connection far
> outweighs the savings involved.
>
> --
> Whenever I feel blue, I start breathing again.

Not a problem anywhere. It boots up just fine. Dell has the pinout on their
web. I checked against the ATX list. It matched up OK.
Took the 4 pin connector and leads from the dead supply and replaced an
unused connector on my old supply to bring in the 12 volts. All the
voltage/current ratings matched.

Thanks for the assist


Charlie


 
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Toolman Tim
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-09-2006
In news:(E-Mail Removed),
Charlie Bress spewed forth:
> "Toolman Tim" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:YxS7g.372$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> In news:(E-Mail Removed),
>> Charlie Bress spewed forth:
>>> "Toolman Tim" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>> news:4LR7g.46$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>> In news:(E-Mail Removed),
>>>> Charlie Bress spewed forth:
>>>>> I am working on a Dell 2350. The original p/s appears to be dead.
>>>>> I have an ATX p/s that will power up the box. I have nothing
>>>>> attached as yet. No keyboard, mouse monitor etc. Just looking for
>>>>> life. The fans come on. It is alive.
>>>>>
>>>>> I am aware that Dell uses a nonstandard pinout. The pinout on the
>>>>> main power connector matches up with my list of outputs for a
>>>>> standard ATX. There is one extra connector that Dell uses. It
>>>>> brings 12 volt power to the mobo. What is the purpose of this 12v
>>>>> line? Will I create a problem by powering up the whole system to
>>>>> see if the peripheral stuff works before I spring for the right
>>>>> replacement?
>>>>>
>>>>> Is it feasible to simply splice this "extra" connector into the
>>>>> lines from the main connector and use the p/s on hand?
>>>>>
>>>>> Charlie
>>>>
>>>> Try this: http://www.endpcnoise.com/cgi-bin/e/...=dellconverter
>>>>
>>>> It has a picture. If that's the problem you have, then yes, you can
>>>> probably make your own adapter. But you'd better really REALLY do
>>>> your research first. Try here:
>>>> http://www.quepublishing.com/article...&seqNum=4&rl=1
>>>>
>>>> If that ISN'T what you're talking about, you may be seeing the P4
>>>> power supply plug required by most newer motherboards, and supplied
>>>> by most newer power supplies. That is covered in the same article
>>>> as above.
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Whenever I feel blue, I start breathing again.
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Looking at the refernce you posted, I found the following
>>> information. "If you are replacing your motherboard with a new one that
>>> requires
>>> the ATX12V connection for the CPU voltage regulator, and yet your
>>> existing power supply doesn't have that connector, an easy solution
>>> is available. Merely convert one of the peripheral power connectors
>>> to an ATX12V type. PC Power and Cooling has released just such an
>>> adapter that can instantly make any standard ATX power supply into
>>> one with an ATX12V connector. The issue is not whether the power
>>> supply can generate the necessary 12v-that has always been available
>>> via the peripheral connectors."
>>>
>>> That is essentially what I have. he supply I have is an old on that
>>> was cannabilized from a junker. The mobo in the Dell is only about 2
>>> years old. So I will just grab an extra power connector and use the
>>> 12 volt connector from the dead supply. The pin outs for the main
>>> connector do not show a discrepancy.
>>>
>>> Charlie

>>
>> My thoughts exactly. But since there have been several changes in
>> the last few years to power supply connectors (the newest being the
>> addition of SATA connectors) I thought the picture and good
>> descriptions would be helpful.
>>
>> Just remember: at the relatively small cost of a new power supply,
>> if you aren't certain you can do the job correctly the FIRST time,
>> think twice about just buying a new one. The cost of replacing a CPU
>> or motherboard (or both) or even more parts because of a botched
>> power connection far outweighs the savings involved.
>>
>> --
>> Whenever I feel blue, I start breathing again.

> Not a problem anywhere. It boots up just fine. Dell has the pinout on
> their web. I checked against the ATX list. It matched up OK.
> Took the 4 pin connector and leads from the dead supply and replaced
> an unused connector on my old supply to bring in the 12 volts. All the
> voltage/current ratings matched.
>
> Thanks for the assist
>

Good job! I think Dell has moved away from the really proprietary stuff.

--
Whenever I feel blue, I start breathing again.


 
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