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DNS problems with new active directory home lab

 
 
Max
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      10-02-2003
I am studying for the 270 test as my first Microsoft exam. I am
concentrating on XP Pro, but I need to setup a Server 2003 server that will
be the domain controller, and DNS server, then later an RIS server for the
lab.
The lab network is connected to a Linksys router that's connected to a cable
modem. The Linksys also provides DHCP and internet access for the
workstations on the network. I set up the server to have a static address
and it also needs internet access.

I have an XP workstation and a Win2k laptop.
The Win 2k laptop is connected via wireless and when I try to join it to the
domain I am prompted for a user name and password as expected. However, the
XP workstation is connected to the Linksys router via an ethernet cable, and
is unable to see the domain. (I would have expected to have more problems
with the wireless Win2k laptop.)

I was trying various DNS server settings and I can't get the XP Pro
workstation to see the domain controller. I finally formatted the server
and I'll try again later with all the default settings again.

I really did not want to spend so much time configuring the server since I
am just trying to do the workstation exercises for now.
What are the minimum basic steps you need to do with the DNS server setup so
that the computers on the network will be able to resolve the server's host
name and join the AD? It looks like leaving everything at default doesn't
work.


 
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AT
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      10-02-2003
Your DC should be connected to the cable modem and your Linksys router to
your DC.
The routers are normally set up with 192.168.0.1 as their IP address and
that could probably interfere with what you have for your DC. Also take the
DHCP off the router and use your DC for DHCP. Good luck

AT

"Max" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> I am studying for the 270 test as my first Microsoft exam. I am
> concentrating on XP Pro, but I need to setup a Server 2003 server that

will
> be the domain controller, and DNS server, then later an RIS server for the
> lab.
> The lab network is connected to a Linksys router that's connected to a

cable
> modem. The Linksys also provides DHCP and internet access for the
> workstations on the network. I set up the server to have a static address
> and it also needs internet access.
>
> I have an XP workstation and a Win2k laptop.
> The Win 2k laptop is connected via wireless and when I try to join it to

the
> domain I am prompted for a user name and password as expected. However,

the
> XP workstation is connected to the Linksys router via an ethernet cable,

and
> is unable to see the domain. (I would have expected to have more problems
> with the wireless Win2k laptop.)
>
> I was trying various DNS server settings and I can't get the XP Pro
> workstation to see the domain controller. I finally formatted the server
> and I'll try again later with all the default settings again.
>
> I really did not want to spend so much time configuring the server since I
> am just trying to do the workstation exercises for now.
> What are the minimum basic steps you need to do with the DNS server setup

so
> that the computers on the network will be able to resolve the server's

host
> name and join the AD? It looks like leaving everything at default doesn't
> work.
>
>



 
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Rick
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Posts: n/a
 
      10-02-2003
I am going to go step by step.
1) Connect you Linksys directly to the Cable modem
2) Connect both you PC and your Server to the Linksys
3) Use Internet explorer to go into you linksys router and look at you
status. The status should tell you what the two DNS servers are for the
internet. You will need this later to setup forwards on your 2003 Domain
controller.
4) Install 2003 Server with a static IP address I think the router uses
192.168.1.1 so set the server to 192.168.1.2 use 192.168.1.1 as the default
gateway Set your DNS server to 192.168.1.2 (yes that is the same IP as your
DC which is correct)
(these instructions are from a 2000 server Domain controller environment
but should work with 2003)
5) Run DC Promo or Active Directory wizard. When you choose a domain name
use name.local where Name is any name you chose and .local. The .local
signifies that it is not going to be used as an internet domain.
6) run the MMC for DNS after AD has finished installing. If I Recall
correctly you should only see a forward and reverse lookup zone for you
domain. if you see something that is simple a period for the name you need
to delete that so that you can setup forwarders. I believe the period
signifies a root domain which you do not want!
7) In the DNS MMC Right click on server name and go to properties from there
click on forwarders. enable forwarders and put in the DNS address from your
ISP.
open your Internet explorer to check if it works. If you can browse the
internet continue
9) load DHCP and disable DHCP on the router.
10) create a DHCP Scope for 192.168.1.1 subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
11) Exclude 192.168.1.1 through 192.168.1.5 (I would do this so you could
add other static devices such as printers)
12) set the DHCP scope options i.e. router (192.168.1.1) DNS (192.168.1.2)
13) Authorize DHCP server
13) reboot you XP machine and see if it gets an IP address and can browse
the internet.

At this point if all is working you should be able to join you XP box to the
domain

These steps will work but there are many details I have left out. If you do
the research to understand all of this you will be able to complete the
task. It will also help you with server test which I expect you are also
looking to take. Hope this helps


Rick


 
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Max
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-02-2003
I tried following those steps and it worked after I found out about
authorizing the DHCP server and manually entering the gateway and dns server
addresses so the DHCP server would assign those automatcially instead of
only assigning an IP and subnet mask.
Great. Both the wireless Win2k laptop and the wired XP Pro workstation can
join the domain (but only if I add the .local to the domain name).
Now I can go back to concentrating on studying XP Pro as long as the the
server remains problem free from this point on.
The machine I'm running the 2003 Server on is too noisy to keep running all
the time, so I'll turn it off and reactivate DHCP through the Linksys
whenever I'm not using it for lab exercises.





"Rick" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> I am going to go step by step.
> 1) Connect you Linksys directly to the Cable modem
> 2) Connect both you PC and your Server to the Linksys
> 3) Use Internet explorer to go into you linksys router and look at you
> status. The status should tell you what the two DNS servers are for the
> internet. You will need this later to setup forwards on your 2003 Domain
> controller.
> 4) Install 2003 Server with a static IP address I think the router uses
> 192.168.1.1 so set the server to 192.168.1.2 use 192.168.1.1 as the

default
> gateway Set your DNS server to 192.168.1.2 (yes that is the same IP as

your
> DC which is correct)
> (these instructions are from a 2000 server Domain controller environment
> but should work with 2003)
> 5) Run DC Promo or Active Directory wizard. When you choose a domain name
> use name.local where Name is any name you chose and .local. The .local
> signifies that it is not going to be used as an internet domain.
> 6) run the MMC for DNS after AD has finished installing. If I Recall
> correctly you should only see a forward and reverse lookup zone for you
> domain. if you see something that is simple a period for the name you need
> to delete that so that you can setup forwarders. I believe the period
> signifies a root domain which you do not want!
> 7) In the DNS MMC Right click on server name and go to properties from

there
> click on forwarders. enable forwarders and put in the DNS address from

your
> ISP.
> open your Internet explorer to check if it works. If you can browse the
> internet continue
> 9) load DHCP and disable DHCP on the router.
> 10) create a DHCP Scope for 192.168.1.1 subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
> 11) Exclude 192.168.1.1 through 192.168.1.5 (I would do this so you could
> add other static devices such as printers)
> 12) set the DHCP scope options i.e. router (192.168.1.1) DNS (192.168.1.2)
> 13) Authorize DHCP server
> 13) reboot you XP machine and see if it gets an IP address and can browse
> the internet.
>
> At this point if all is working you should be able to join you XP box to

the
> domain
>
> These steps will work but there are many details I have left out. If you

do
> the research to understand all of this you will be able to complete the
> task. It will also help you with server test which I expect you are also
> looking to take. Hope this helps
>
>
> Rick
>
>



 
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