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Yahoo account password harvester?

 
 
Senti
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      03-16-2006
Can someone confirm for me whether or not this is a fake Yahoo site?

http://wowthischiksarehot.gratishost.com/login.php

Anyway, I was on YIM and a friend of mine quickly popped on and sent me
this message:

(12:23:54) fakeusername: Hi check out this girls page
www.geocities.com/the.litllecat
(12:23:57) fakeusername logged out.

I was kind of suspicious because she's at work right now and can't use
Yahoo. Anyway, the URL from the message redirects to the URL at the
top. I'm guessing that someone is trying to harvest Yahoo account IDs
and passwords. I've already told her to change her password and scan
for viruses/worm/trojans. Better to be paranoid than be wrong.

--
In 1797 James Hetherington invented the top hat and wore it in public.
He was arrested for disturbing the peace.
 
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Trax
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      03-16-2006
Senti <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

|>Can someone confirm for me whether or not this is a fake Yahoo site?
|>
|>http://wowthischiksarehot.gratishost.com/login.php

I call fake, from the source it receives it's Yahoo graphics from:
http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/yahoo.gif

WhoIs reports
Looking up us.i1.yimg.com at whois.abuse.net.

http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) (for yimg.com)

Above are the results from www.abuse.net, and are the E-mail
address(es) that abuse complaints should be sent to.


|>Anyway, I was on YIM and a friend of mine quickly popped on and sent me
|>this message:
|>
|>(12:23:54) fakeusername: Hi check out this girls page
|>www.geocities.com/the.litllecat
|>(12:23:57) fakeusername logged out.
|>
|>I was kind of suspicious because she's at work right now and can't use
|>Yahoo. Anyway, the URL from the message redirects to the URL at the
|>top. I'm guessing that someone is trying to harvest Yahoo account IDs
|>and passwords. I've already told her to change her password and scan
|>for viruses/worm/trojans. Better to be paranoid than be wrong.


--
The Abu Ghraib files
http://salon.com/news/abu_ghraib/200.../introduction/
 
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Evan Platt
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      03-16-2006
On Thu, 16 Mar 2006 19:00:09 GMT, Senti
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Can someone confirm for me whether or not this is a fake Yahoo site?
>
>http://wowthischiksarehot.gratishost.com/login.php


Considering the word 'yahoo' doesn't appear anywhere in it.. I'd say
it's most likely.. umm.. Hmm. . Wait, I need to think.

>Anyway, I was on YIM and a friend of mine quickly popped on and sent me
>this message:
>
>(12:23:54) fakeusername: Hi check out this girls page
>www.geocities.com/the.litllecat
>(12:23:57) fakeusername logged out.
>
>I was kind of suspicious because she's at work right now and can't use
>Yahoo. Anyway, the URL from the message redirects to the URL at the
>top. I'm guessing that someone is trying to harvest Yahoo account IDs
>and passwords. I've already told her to change her password and scan
>for viruses/worm/trojans. Better to be paranoid than be wrong.


Your friend is infected by a worm. I had a friend send me a similar
link, and it turns out she had downloaded a program and it IM'd the
site to everyone in her buddy list.
 
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Paulos
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      03-16-2006
Hey senti did you also know he was the cause of the riot that got him
arrested and a few years later the bowler hat appeared and barely anyone
noticed!!!

--
Cheers Paulos
"Senti" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:ZAiSf.150478$H%4.116932@pd7tw2no...
> Can someone confirm for me whether or not this is a fake Yahoo site?
>
> http://wowthischiksarehot.gratishost.com/login.php
>
> Anyway, I was on YIM and a friend of mine quickly popped on and sent me
> this message:
>
> (12:23:54) fakeusername: Hi check out this girls page
> www.geocities.com/the.litllecat
> (12:23:57) fakeusername logged out.
>
> I was kind of suspicious because she's at work right now and can't use
> Yahoo. Anyway, the URL from the message redirects to the URL at the top.
> I'm guessing that someone is trying to harvest Yahoo account IDs and
> passwords. I've already told her to change her password and scan for
> viruses/worm/trojans. Better to be paranoid than be wrong.
>
> --
> In 1797 James Hetherington invented the top hat and wore it in public. He
> was arrested for disturbing the peace.



 
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Senti
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-17-2006
No I hadn't known that. Thanks, Paulos.

And thanks to the others who replied to my post. The advice was
appreciated.

~SF

Paulos wrote:
> Hey senti did you also know he was the cause of the riot that got him
> arrested and a few years later the bowler hat appeared and barely anyone
> noticed!!!
>

 
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Oldus Fartus
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      03-17-2006
Paulos wrote:
> Hey senti did you also know he was the cause of the riot that got him
> arrested and a few years later the bowler hat appeared and barely anyone
> noticed!!!
>


An excellent history of the top-hat, and unashamedly plagiarized is:

History of the Top Hat

When Emily Post laid down her rules regarding top hats, she included one
that had nothing to do with etiquette. "Wear it level on your head," she
said. Now, I’ll accept Mrs. Post’s authority when it comes to whether I
should take my hat off in an elevator, but as to how my hat should sit
on my head, no thank you. As it happens, she was dead wrong about the
top hat. A man should not wear it flat on his head. He should wear it
tilted forward and to one side - very slightly though, no more than 10
degrees in either direction - about the same angle Lord Ribblesdale wore
his in the famous portrait by John Singer Sargent.

I single out Lord Ribblesdale, because as he is seen in the Sargent
portrait he represents the ultimate in top-hatted aplomb. He wears a
long riding coat, a white waistcoat, shiny black riding boots, and
jodhpurs. One hand rests on his hip, the other clutches a riding crop,
and he looks straight out of the canvas in a strong, forthright manner.
The painting is a study in refined self-assurance, which is precisely
the attitude the top hat was intended to convey. This is the hat, after
all, that inspired the expression "high hat" as a designation of
arrogance and snobbishness. Ribblesdale himself was the epitome of the
Edwardian aristocrat; he was master of the backhands and lord-in-waiting
to Queen Victoria. The hat that sat so perfectly on his head was the hat
that dominated the nineteenth century.

This was a surprise to everybody, because his top hat caused a riot the
first time it was seen in London. The perpetrator was a haberdasher name
John Hetherington, who designed it, made it and was the first person to
wear it into the street. According to a contemporary newspaper account,
passersby panicked at the sight. Several women fainted, children
screamed, dogs yelped, and an errand boy’s arm was broken when he was
trampled by the mob. Hetherington was hauled into court for wearing "a
tall structure having a shining luster calculated to frighten timid
people." It was much ado about nothing, really; Hetherington had merely
concocted a silk-covered variation of the contemporary riding hat, which
had a wider brim, a lower crown, and was made of beaver. There was
initial resistance to Hetherington’s silk topper from those who wanted
to continue wearing beaver hats. But in 1850 Prince Albert started
wearing top hats made of "hatter’s plush" (a fine silk shag), and that
effectively settled the questions; coincidentally it also all but wiped
out the beaver-trapping industry in America.

It’s easy to see from old photographs and drawings why the nineteenth
century is sometimes know as the Century of the Top Hat. Men wore top
hats for business, pleasure and formal occasions - pearl gray for
daytime, black for day or night. The historian James Laver once made the
observation that an assemblage of toppers looked like factory chimney’s
and thus added to the mood of the industrial era. The height and contour
of the hat fluctuated with the decades. In England, post-Brummel dandies
went in for flared crowns and swooping brims. Their counterparts in
France, known as the Incroyables, wore top hats of such outlandish
dimensions that there was no room for them in overcrowded cloakrooms
until Antoine Gibus came along in 1823 and invented the collapsible
opera hat. Later on, the American financier J. P. Morgan approached the
same problem from another angle; he ordered a limousine with an
especially high roof so he could ride around without taking his hat off.
A milestone of a different sort was achieved in 1814 by a French
magician named Louis Comte; he became the first conjurer on record to
pull a white rabbit out of a top hat.

By the time Sargent painted Ribblesdale’s portrait in 1902, the top hat
was actually nearing the end of its century-long primacy, soon to be
replaced by the more compact homburg. In short order, the top hat
settled into the status it has today - that of a costume prop, a
graceful anachronism worn with white tie, tails and gloves on only the
rarest of formal ceremonies.

The top hat is a piece of history now, not really a part of the
contemporary wardrobe despite its occasional uses. For a while, back in
the 1930s and 1940s, Europeans got the false impression that it was
making a comeback in American. They’d been watching Fred Astaire movies
and simply assumed that all American men were dressing the way he did.
Astaire wore top hats in a dozen or more films (notably Top Hat, in
1935). In fact, I’d have to say that after Lord Ribblesdale, Astaire was
one of the most accomplished top hat wearers of all time. He wore the
hat tilted, of course - at a jaunty, almost rakish angle. Emily Post
would not have approved.

Article by John Berendt



--
Cheers
Oldus Fartus
 
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