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C++ shines in what application domains?

 
 
Joe Van Dyk
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      05-23-2006
Hi,

What application domains is C++ "best of breed" in?

I can make strong arguments for C++ in embedded systems and realtime
software, and that's pretty much it.

Thanks,
Joe
 
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Jim Langston
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      05-23-2006

"Joe Van Dyk" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hi,
>
> What application domains is C++ "best of breed" in?
>
> I can make strong arguments for C++ in embedded systems and realtime
> software, and that's pretty much it.


It tends to work good for games IMO, as the object oreintation fits well
with "objects" in a game.


 
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Joe Van Dyk
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      05-23-2006
Jim Langston wrote:
> "Joe Van Dyk" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>>Hi,
>>
>>What application domains is C++ "best of breed" in?
>>
>>I can make strong arguments for C++ in embedded systems and realtime
>>software, and that's pretty much it.

>
>
> It tends to work good for games IMO, as the object oreintation fits well
> with "objects" in a game.


Oh yes, I left out (complex) games from my list. Although, games could
be made with a "dynamic" or "scripting" layer, but it probably depends
on the game as to what parts of the game should be in that scriptable
layer. I have zero game experience, so I have no idea.

Joe


 
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Markus Schoder
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      05-23-2006
Joe Van Dyk wrote:
> Hi,
>
> What application domains is C++ "best of breed" in?
>
> I can make strong arguments for C++ in embedded systems and realtime
> software, and that's pretty much it.


- numerical computation (possibly with an extension similar to C99's
"restricted" keyword)
- 3D graphics
- pretty much any "off the shelf" software for the mass market

 
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phlip
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      05-23-2006
Joe Van Dyk wrote:

> What application domains is C++ "best of breed" in?


All the ones where you tried a more programmer-friendly language, and
failed these criteria:

- portability
- deployability
- performance
- footprint
- interoperability

--
Phlip
 
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Cy Edmunds
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      05-23-2006

"Joe Van Dyk" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Jim Langston wrote:
>> "Joe Van Dyk" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>
>>>Hi,
>>>
>>>What application domains is C++ "best of breed" in?
>>>
>>>I can make strong arguments for C++ in embedded systems and realtime
>>>software, and that's pretty much it.

>>
>>
>> It tends to work good for games IMO, as the object oreintation fits well
>> with "objects" in a game.

>
> Oh yes, I left out (complex) games from my list. Although, games could be
> made with a "dynamic" or "scripting" layer, but it probably depends on the
> game as to what parts of the game should be in that scriptable layer. I
> have zero game experience, so I have no idea.
>
> Joe
>
>


Most games today are written in C++ and a (often home-brewed) scripting
language.

Cy


 
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Joe Van Dyk
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      05-23-2006
Markus Schoder wrote:
> Joe Van Dyk wrote:
>
>>Hi,
>>
>>What application domains is C++ "best of breed" in?
>>
>>I can make strong arguments for C++ in embedded systems and realtime
>>software, and that's pretty much it.

>
>
> - numerical computation (possibly with an extension similar to C99's
> "restricted" keyword)
> - 3D graphics


How does C++ excel at 3D graphics?

Joe

> - pretty much any "off the shelf" software for the mass market
>

 
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res7cxbi@verizon.net
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      05-24-2006
Because the APIs that handles 3D graphics are supported, and sometimes
only, in C++, and C++ is fast.

For example, OpenGL and DirectX.

You can always implement a 3D engine in any language, however, 3D
Graphics require an intensive amount of computing power
Languages like Java are more than capable for 3D engine, however, the
performance may not be enough for any hard-core graphics.
The speed of C++ makes it possible for programmers to create engines
fast enough for their needs.

 
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Phlip
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      05-24-2006
res7cxbi wrote:

> Because the APIs that handles 3D graphics are supported, and sometimes
> only, in C++, and C++ is fast.
>
> For example, OpenGL and DirectX.


Yup. Two magnificent examples of pure C++ there!



--
Phlip
http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?ZeekLand <-- NOT a blog!!!


 
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Jerry Coffin
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      05-24-2006
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) says...
> Hi,
>
> What application domains is C++ "best of breed" in?


Depending on viewpoint, probably none -- for almost any
individual application, there will often be a language
that's at least arguably better. A large system, however,
will often include applications that favor quite a few
different languages, but trying to implement each in its
own language becomes unwieldy. A common alternative is to
ignore the absolute best for a specific application in
favor of one that's close to that good, but for a much
wider variety of applications.

> I can make strong arguments for C++ in embedded systems and realtime
> software, and that's pretty much it.


C++ offers a combination of reasonable portability, a
reasonable degree of low-level access to the machine, and
a reasonable degree of high-level organization of the
code.

C++ offers relatively easy low-level access to things
like raw memory (albeit, non-portably) that supports
writing things like device drivers and operating systems.
Likewise, its bit manipulation capabilities allow it to
work reasonably well for things like encryption, network
packet processing (e.g routing, computing CRCs) and so
on.

It has mid-level capabilities such as data structuring
and modularity that make it reasonable for writing things
like compilers, interpreters, virtual machines, network
protocols, numeric processing, and so on. Many of these
also depend (to varying degrees) on the lower-level
capabilities as well, of course.

It has high-level code-organization capabilities such as
object orientation, exception handling, and templates
that help considerably in controlling complexity while
building larger systems.

The first were mostly inherited from C. The last is
(largely) what C++ added.

--
Later,
Jerry.

The universe is a figment of its own imagination.
 
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