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who read what c++ books and best learning practices?

 
 
puzzlecracker
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      05-08-2006
It'd be interesting to compare the learning practices of c++
practitioners. I'll start with mine

The C++ Programming Language
C++ Primer
Effective C++
More Effective C++
Effective STL
The C++ Standard Library : A Tutorial and Reference (most of it)
Exceptional C++
More Exceptional C++
C++ strategies and tactics
Designed Patterns
Professional C++ (started reading, but didn't like it after first
chapter - thus stopped)

This summer goal:
Large Scale design in C++
C++ Templates
Thinking in C++ both volumes

Suggestions, other peoples experiences, comments?

How's is C++ doing these days?

I am ended being a java developer (never developed a commercial
software in C++, only for fun).

Cheers,

puzzlecracker

 
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Jonathan Mcdougall
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      05-08-2006
puzzlecracker wrote:
> It'd be interesting to compare the learning practices of c++
> practitioners. I'll start with mine


Your next book should be about usenet etiquette. Meanwhile, RTFM.

http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/


Jonathan

 
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Phlip
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      05-08-2006
Jonathan Mcdougall wrote:

> puzzlecracker wrote:
>> It'd be interesting to compare the learning practices of c++
>> practitioners. I'll start with mine

>
> Your next book should be about usenet etiquette. Meanwhile, RTFM.
>
> http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/


Wha'd he do wrong? We discuss books here all the time...

--
Phlip
http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?ZeekLand <-- NOT a blog!!!


 
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Roy Smith
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      05-08-2006
In article <(E-Mail Removed). com>,
"puzzlecracker" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> It'd be interesting to compare the learning practices of c++
> practitioners. I'll start with mine
>
> The C++ Programming Language
> C++ Primer
> Effective C++
> More Effective C++
> Effective STL
> The C++ Standard Library : A Tutorial and Reference (most of it)
> Exceptional C++
> More Exceptional C++
> C++ strategies and tactics
> Designed Patterns
> Professional C++ (started reading, but didn't like it after first
> chapter - thus stopped)
>
> This summer goal:
> Large Scale design in C++
> C++ Templates
> Thinking in C++ both volumes
>
> Suggestions, other peoples experiences, comments?


Not a bad reading list, but I do have a comment. Learn something else.
No, I'm not being facetious. Learn Python, Ruby, Smalltalk, C#, D,
whatever. Maybe not all of them, but certainly more than one. This may
not make you a better "C++ practitioner", but it'll make you a more rounded
programmer, as you see how similar problems can be solved in different ways.

> How's is C++ doing these days?


It's a dying language. It's been dying for the last 10 years, and I
predict it will continue to be dying for the next 10 or 20 years. I think
there will continue to be a market for good C++ programmers for a long
time, but there will be an even better market for good programmers, for
whom C++ is just one of their skills.
 
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puzzlecracker
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      05-08-2006

> It's a dying language. It's been dying for the last 10 years, and I
> predict it will continue to be dying for the next 10 or 20 years. I think
> there will continue to be a market for good C++ programmers for a long
> time, but there will be an even better market for good programmers, for
> whom C++ is just one of their skills.


What is a good compliment to C++?

What good technologies these exploit?

thx

 
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Jonathan Mcdougall
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      05-08-2006
Phlip wrote:
> Jonathan Mcdougall wrote:
>
> > puzzlecracker wrote:
> >> It'd be interesting to compare the learning practices of c++
> >> practitioners. I'll start with mine

> >
> > Your next book should be about usenet etiquette. Meanwhile, RTFM.
> >
> > http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/

>
> Wha'd he do wrong? We discuss books here all the time...


Oh, he's done nothing wrong per se with this post. It's just that he's
a chronic troll. Look it up, it`s actually fun.


Jonathan

 
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Roy Smith
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      05-08-2006
In article <(E-Mail Removed) .com>,
"puzzlecracker" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> > It's a dying language. It's been dying for the last 10 years, and I
> > predict it will continue to be dying for the next 10 or 20 years. I think
> > there will continue to be a market for good C++ programmers for a long
> > time, but there will be an even better market for good programmers, for
> > whom C++ is just one of their skills.

>
> What is a good compliment to C++?


Well, in my original post, I listed "Python, Ruby, Smalltalk, C#, D". I
think any of those would be worth learning. They're all object oriented
languages, and all have somewhat different design goals and philosophies.
You indicated that you already know Java, so I didn't put that on the list;
it goes without saying that any well-rounded programmer today should have
at least some familiarity with Java.

Of those on my list, Smalltalk and D are probably the least commercially
important today (and C# the most). Smalltalk will give you a historical
perspective. D will let you explore some "what if" scenarios in current
language design.
 
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Alan Johnson
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      05-08-2006
puzzlecracker wrote:
>> It's a dying language. It's been dying for the last 10 years, and I
>> predict it will continue to be dying for the next 10 or 20 years. I think
>> there will continue to be a market for good C++ programmers for a long
>> time, but there will be an even better market for good programmers, for
>> whom C++ is just one of their skills.

>
> What is a good compliment to C++?
>
> What good technologies these exploit?
>
> thx
>


I recommend the following, which have nothing to do with any particular
language:

1. Fundamentals of Algorithmics, by Gilles Brassard and Paul Bratley

A good introduction to algorithmics, with a decent balance between the
academic and the pragmatic.

2. Algorithmic Design, by Jon Kleinberg and Eva Tardos

This was clearly designed to be an undergraduate Algorithms text book,
complete with problem sets.

3. Introduction to Algorithms, by Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest, and Stein

This book, referred to commonly as just CLRS, is less of an
introduction, and more of massive catalog of algorithms, along with
proofs of correctness and run-time analysis.


If you've really read (and understood) all the books on your list, then
you've already extracted all but a marginal amount of the value
available from studying C++, and you'd do much better to study computer
science in general.

If you are looking for a new language to learn, I suggest Lisp. It is
likely you have a good grasp on procedural programming, and if you read
and understood Design Patterns, you likely have a decent grasp on object
oriented programming as well. Learning Lisp would complete the picture
by teaching you functional programming (assuming you don't already have
experience with it).

--
Alan Johnson
 
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Phlip
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      05-08-2006
Jonathan Mcdougall wrote:

>> Wha'd he do wrong? We discuss books here all the time...

>
> Oh, he's done nothing wrong per se with this post. It's just that he's
> a chronic troll. Look it up, it`s actually fun.


I'm completely aware of his posting history and I only fault him for being
socially inept.

Sure, the FAQ might possibly cover "don't post short open-ended questions
that sound like prompts for exam essays", but I don't see how just posting
RTFM will improve things...

--
Phlip
http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?ZeekLand <-- NOT a blog!!!


 
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Phlip
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      05-08-2006
puzzlecracker wrote:

>> It's a dying language. It's been dying for the last 10 years, and I
>> predict it will continue to be dying for the next 10 or 20 years. I
>> think
>> there will continue to be a market for good C++ programmers for a long
>> time, but there will be an even better market for good programmers, for
>> whom C++ is just one of their skills.


I think the industry has yet to learn if the pure STL-style of programming,
beyond mere "C with Classes", will take off and lead to killer apps.

> What is a good compliment to C++?


C++ represents the static typing model within OO. Get with a dynamic typing
model, such as Python, Ruby, or Smalltalk. Perl also qualifies - just as
Java qualifieds as another static model - but they come with major issues.

> What good technologies these exploit?


Good dynamic languages are very easy to extend and bond with existing
systems. So for example Ruby distributions can easily bundle with GUI
toolkits like Tk, Qt, FOX, FLTK, etc. The ability to bond modules together
is very important.

--
Phlip
http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?ZeekLand <-- NOT a blog!!!


 
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