Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Programming > C Programming > C compiler variants

Reply
Thread Tools

C compiler variants

 
 
DanielJohnson
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-20-2007
I am a newbie in C programming and I have already heard lot of C
compiler variants including ANSI, C9X, Borland etc. Could somebody
complete the list.

Which compiler is the most versatile and largely used ? I am using gcc
on Ubuntu as I don't have access to any other ones.

Can sombody throw light on how the journey of C has changed from K&R
times to now.

Thanks

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Richard Heathfield
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      02-20-2007
DanielJohnson said:

> I am a newbie in C programming and I have already heard lot of C
> compiler variants including ANSI, C9X, Borland etc. Could somebody
> complete the list.


ANSI and C9X aren't compilers, for a start.

ANSI is the American National Standards Institute, which standardised C
in 1989. For short, we call that C Standard "C89", but it's a standard,
not a compiler. ISO (the International Standards Organisation) adopted
that standard the following year, which is why we also refer to "C90".
"C9X" was the great upgrade-to-C project which finally resulted in a
modification to the Standard (the X was used because they didn't know
when they'd finish). This has become known as C99, since it was
eventually released in 1999. (There was a minor update in 1995 too,
which some people ignore and others know as C95.)

To list all the C compilers is a task beyond my ability to answer, but
the principal serious contenders are gcc in its many flavours,
Microsoft C, and Borland C. C/370 and perhaps LE370 for the mainframe
market, Norcroft for embedded systems. Dozens more, though.

All these compilers (as far as I know, anyway) conform to the ANSI C
Standard of 1989 - and *therefore* the ISO C Standard of 1990 (since
it's the same document, just with different section numbering because
ISO added a few lumps of boilerplate to the beginning).

None of them, as far as I know, conform to C99. There are one or two
conforming C99 compilers out there, but nobody I know actually uses
one. C99 conformance is not high on the implementation agenda, and is
unlikely to become so.


> Which compiler is the most versatile and largely used ? I am using gcc
> on Ubuntu as I don't have access to any other ones.


gcc is fine.

> Can sombody throw light on how the journey of C has changed from K&R
> times to now.


See above for a quick precis, or take a peek at
http://www.cs.bell-labs.com/who/dmr/ for some background on C.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
15454-OC121IR1310 Variants Will Cisco 0 06-29-2005 01:46 AM
Re: Open source is a real phenomenon, but it doesn't require unix variants. Avengerę Computer Support 13 02-05-2005 05:54 AM
Question: Comparing template singleton variants John Harrison C++ 7 11-12-2004 08:21 AM
fgets and variants Diego C Programming 2 04-03-2004 03:25 AM
WORM_NACHI.A + variants FeaolPlay Computer Support 0 09-22-2003 09:38 AM



Advertisments