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Suggestions for positions now that I have MCSD

 
 
Hermit Dave
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Posts: n/a
 
      08-31-2004
rightly said..

--

Regards,

Hermit Dave
(http://hdave.blogspot.com)
<WKidd> wrote in message news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> IT developers are like the journeyman sailors of the 18th century. We sign
> up with the first ship that comes to port looking for an able seaman,
> experience a shipwreck or two, survive (or even participate in) a good
> mutiny, occasionally find ourselves languishing unemployed in some port,

and
> dream of one day being master or even commander of our own vessel.
> WKidd
>
> "The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere" <.> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > >My advice to anyone just getting started would be to first finish their
> > >degree (4 years will suffice)

> >
> > too right.
> >
> > > It
> > >doesn't matter which development shop, a good observer can learn

lessons
> > >even from a bad shop.

> >
> > although the reputation of the 'bad shop', as you put it, travels with
> > you has well....
> >
> > Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3

>
>



 
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Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-31-2004
Yohoho and A Bottle Of Rum!!!


"Hermit Dave" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> rightly said..
>
> --
>
> Regards,
>
> Hermit Dave
> (http://hdave.blogspot.com)
> <WKidd> wrote in message news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > IT developers are like the journeyman sailors of the 18th century. We

sign
> > up with the first ship that comes to port looking for an able seaman,
> > experience a shipwreck or two, survive (or even participate in) a good
> > mutiny, occasionally find ourselves languishing unemployed in some port,

> and
> > dream of one day being master or even commander of our own vessel.
> > WKidd
> >
> > "The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere" <.> wrote in message
> > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > > >My advice to anyone just getting started would be to first finish

their
> > > >degree (4 years will suffice)
> > >
> > > too right.
> > >
> > > > It
> > > >doesn't matter which development shop, a good observer can learn

> lessons
> > > >even from a bad shop.
> > >
> > > although the reputation of the 'bad shop', as you put it, travels with
> > > you has well....
> > >
> > > Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3

> >
> >

>
>



 
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Eric
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-03-2004
Geoff wrote:

> No company in their right mind would be interested in
> employing someone who does not have the proper on the job
> experience within the company's area of expertise. It is
> giving people false hope suggesting otherwise.
>


I disagree. I think a URL aimed at a site you made yourself is better
than having nothing at all to show a company.

Of course, you can bring in code samples to show off some work you did,
but they really like to see the end result - especially when web sites
are involved.

It should be non-trivial in order to have some value, and preferably a
site that uses a back-end database.

The use a a data access layer, and a business object layer, would be
pluses - especially for an entry-level developer. This would show that
you're ready to do "real work".

I totally agree that paid experience is worth more, but if you have no
experience at all, you need to show what you can do in order to get
that first job.

I can't imagine getting a job in ASP.NET if you have nothing at all to
show a company. Jobs are too tight now for that to happen. Of course,
you might get lucky, but I wouldn't plan on getting this lucky.

Eric
 
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The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-03-2004
>It should be non-trivial in order to have some value

indeed if it solves real world business problems.

However, the difference between a noddy web site for some two bit
company, produced for nothing, showing pretty pictures, is somewhat
different than a 'real world' business solution which securely handles
hundreds or thousands of business transactions actions an hour.

Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
 
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Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-06-2004
A large percentage of experienced developers are only involved in one aspect
of a project lifecycle, for example maintenace programming, GUI design or
database development. If you asked them to develop even a simple data driven
website from front to back, including gathering requirements from the
client, then they would drop the ball. Therefore, if someone demonstrated to
me that they personally built a website from front to back for even a small
business or non-profit, then that would be significant.

<Eric> wrote in message news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Geoff wrote:
>
> > No company in their right mind would be interested in
> > employing someone who does not have the proper on the job
> > experience within the company's area of expertise. It is
> > giving people false hope suggesting otherwise.
> >

>
> I disagree. I think a URL aimed at a site you made yourself is better
> than having nothing at all to show a company.
>
> Of course, you can bring in code samples to show off some work you did,
> but they really like to see the end result - especially when web sites
> are involved.
>
> It should be non-trivial in order to have some value, and preferably a
> site that uses a back-end database.
>
> The use a a data access layer, and a business object layer, would be
> pluses - especially for an entry-level developer. This would show that
> you're ready to do "real work".
>
> I totally agree that paid experience is worth more, but if you have no
> experience at all, you need to show what you can do in order to get
> that first job.
>
> I can't imagine getting a job in ASP.NET if you have nothing at all to
> show a company. Jobs are too tight now for that to happen. Of course,
> you might get lucky, but I wouldn't plan on getting this lucky.
>
> Eric



 
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The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-06-2004
>A large percentage of experienced developers are only involved in one aspect
>of a project lifecycle


Very true for freelance people, but not for salaried people.

Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
 
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Hermit Dave
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-06-2004
www.steptall.com

well i provided the client with a way to keep modify home page image and not
i dont know what the heck she's doing...
the images are all different sizes in whole lot of backgrounds... but yes
from requirements to design and dev...

the UI (look) was done by a friend.. i am not good with colours

--

Regards,

Hermit Dave
(http://hdave.blogspot.com)
<WKidd> wrote in message news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> A large percentage of experienced developers are only involved in one

aspect
> of a project lifecycle, for example maintenace programming, GUI design or
> database development. If you asked them to develop even a simple data

driven
> website from front to back, including gathering requirements from the
> client, then they would drop the ball. Therefore, if someone demonstrated

to
> me that they personally built a website from front to back for even a

small
> business or non-profit, then that would be significant.
>
> <Eric> wrote in message news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > Geoff wrote:
> >
> > > No company in their right mind would be interested in
> > > employing someone who does not have the proper on the job
> > > experience within the company's area of expertise. It is
> > > giving people false hope suggesting otherwise.
> > >

> >
> > I disagree. I think a URL aimed at a site you made yourself is better
> > than having nothing at all to show a company.
> >
> > Of course, you can bring in code samples to show off some work you did,
> > but they really like to see the end result - especially when web sites
> > are involved.
> >
> > It should be non-trivial in order to have some value, and preferably a
> > site that uses a back-end database.
> >
> > The use a a data access layer, and a business object layer, would be
> > pluses - especially for an entry-level developer. This would show that
> > you're ready to do "real work".
> >
> > I totally agree that paid experience is worth more, but if you have no
> > experience at all, you need to show what you can do in order to get
> > that first job.
> >
> > I can't imagine getting a job in ASP.NET if you have nothing at all to
> > show a company. Jobs are too tight now for that to happen. Of course,
> > you might get lucky, but I wouldn't plan on getting this lucky.
> >
> > Eric

>
>



 
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Hermit Dave
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-06-2004
that was done sometime last year when i gave 315

--

Regards,

Hermit Dave
(http://hdave.blogspot.com)
"Hermit Dave" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:ucxH$(E-Mail Removed)...
> www.steptall.com
>
> well i provided the client with a way to keep modify home page image and

not
> i dont know what the heck she's doing...
> the images are all different sizes in whole lot of backgrounds... but yes
> from requirements to design and dev...
>
> the UI (look) was done by a friend.. i am not good with colours
>
> --
>
> Regards,
>
> Hermit Dave
> (http://hdave.blogspot.com)
> <WKidd> wrote in message news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > A large percentage of experienced developers are only involved in one

> aspect
> > of a project lifecycle, for example maintenace programming, GUI design

or
> > database development. If you asked them to develop even a simple data

> driven
> > website from front to back, including gathering requirements from the
> > client, then they would drop the ball. Therefore, if someone

demonstrated
> to
> > me that they personally built a website from front to back for even a

> small
> > business or non-profit, then that would be significant.
> >
> > <Eric> wrote in message news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > > Geoff wrote:
> > >
> > > > No company in their right mind would be interested in
> > > > employing someone who does not have the proper on the job
> > > > experience within the company's area of expertise. It is
> > > > giving people false hope suggesting otherwise.
> > > >
> > >
> > > I disagree. I think a URL aimed at a site you made yourself is better
> > > than having nothing at all to show a company.
> > >
> > > Of course, you can bring in code samples to show off some work you

did,
> > > but they really like to see the end result - especially when web sites
> > > are involved.
> > >
> > > It should be non-trivial in order to have some value, and preferably a
> > > site that uses a back-end database.
> > >
> > > The use a a data access layer, and a business object layer, would be
> > > pluses - especially for an entry-level developer. This would show that
> > > you're ready to do "real work".
> > >
> > > I totally agree that paid experience is worth more, but if you have no
> > > experience at all, you need to show what you can do in order to get
> > > that first job.
> > >
> > > I can't imagine getting a job in ASP.NET if you have nothing at all to
> > > show a company. Jobs are too tight now for that to happen. Of course,
> > > you might get lucky, but I wouldn't plan on getting this lucky.
> > >
> > > Eric

> >
> >

>
>



 
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