Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Programming > C Programming > Please Help ----------Free Downloadable Ebooks for C & C++ Language needed

Reply
Thread Tools

Please Help ----------Free Downloadable Ebooks for C & C++ Language needed

 
 
abhay
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-14-2006
hi friends,
i am not new to C language but also i am not an expert at it.
i want some free downloadable links for ebooks on C-language.if anybody
has ebook in pdf format
of C-complete reference please provide me.i would be very grateful.
i want to learn more about data structures in C , file operations ,
hardware interaction through C.

please help me .

also i need some good e-books on C++.i am a beginner to it

thank you

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
santosh
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-14-2006
abhay wrote:
> hi friends,
> i am not new to C language but also i am not an expert at it.
> i want some free downloadable links for ebooks on C-language.if anybody
> has ebook in pdf format
> of C-complete reference please provide me.i would be very grateful.
> i want to learn more about data structures in C , file operations ,
> hardware interaction through C.
>
> please help me .
>
> also i need some good e-books on C++.i am a beginner to it


Why don't you try libraries and used book stores, (both real and
online), instead of engaging in copyright infringement.

Search via Google for 'n1124.pdf' and 'CBook'. Both are free for
downloading and/or using. The former is the latest draft version of the
ISO C standard, while the latter is a reasonably good introduction to
ANSI C. Beyond that, regular practise in programming and perusal of,
and participation in, this group are both excellent ways to develop
your C skills.

Finally, if you can at all offered it, buy a copy of 'The C Programming
Language' Second Edition by Kernighan and Ritchie.

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
abhay
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-15-2006

hi,
I would be grateful if u provide me some direct links or books in pdf
format
this is because most of the links that i am trying are not giving me
any fruitful results.
thank you

 
Reply With Quote
 
jacob navia
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-15-2006
abhay wrote:
> hi friends,
> i am not new to C language but also i am not an expert at it.
> i want some free downloadable links for ebooks on C-language.if anybody
> has ebook in pdf format
> of C-complete reference please provide me.i would be very grateful.
> i want to learn more about data structures in C , file operations ,
> hardware interaction through C.
>
> please help me .
>
> also i need some good e-books on C++.i am a beginner to it
>
> thank you
>


http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~lcc-win32

Download the tutorial.pdf.

It has a complete description of C, and you can download the associated
compiler that goes with the book at the same address.

Enjoy!

jacob

 
Reply With Quote
 
Richard Heathfield
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-15-2006
jacob navia said:

<snip>

> Download the tutorial.pdf.


Have you yet fixed the bugs in that tutorial that were pointed out last time
you pushed it?

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: normal service will be restored as soon as possible. Please do not
adjust your email clients.
 
Reply With Quote
 
CBFalconer
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-15-2006
abhay wrote:
>
> I would be grateful if u provide me some direct links or books in
> pdf format this is because most of the links that i am trying are
> not giving me any fruitful results.


U has never posted to this newsgroup.

--
Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>

 
Reply With Quote
 
Richard Heathfield
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-15-2006
CBFalconer said:

> abhay wrote:
>>
>> I would be grateful if u provide me some direct links or books in
>> pdf format this is because most of the links that i am trying are
>> not giving me any fruitful results.

>
> U has never posted to this newsgroup.


A number of articles have been posted to comp.lang.c by people who boast a
single letter U somewhere in their name. The best candidate I found was
someone rejoicing in the name of U.P., who posted here in March 1998.

Unfortunately, the Google Groups archive has mangled his email address, so
contacting him may prove problematical.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: normal service will be restored as soon as possible. Please do not
adjust your email clients.
 
Reply With Quote
 
jacob navia
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-15-2006
Richard Heathfield wrote:
> jacob navia said:
>
> <snip>
>
>>Download the tutorial.pdf.

>
>
> Have you yet fixed the bugs in that tutorial that were pointed out last time
> you pushed it?
>


Yes, I hope so.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Richard Heathfield
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-15-2006
jacob navia said:

> Richard Heathfield wrote:
>> jacob navia said:
>>
>> <snip>
>>
>>>Download the tutorial.pdf.

>>
>>
>> Have you yet fixed the bugs in that tutorial that were pointed out last
>> time you pushed it?
>>

>
> Yes, I hope so.


Upthread, you said:

"Download the tutorial.pdf. It has a complete description of C"

The tutorial says:

"this is not a full-fledged introduction to all of C." and "there isn't here
a description of all the features of the language".

I spot a contradiction, don't you?

Anyway, here are the next half-dozen bugs for you. But you might find it
easier to find someone who knows C, and get them to go through the whole
thing, fixing all the bugs in one fell swoop.


Minor nit: on page 16, strictly speaking the argument to your printf call is
the result of evaluating "Hello\n" - and that result is a pointer, not a
string.

Medium nit: merely saying that the return value from main is optional is to
miss an opportunity to explain why main returns a value, and what that
value is used for.

Medium nit: For int fn(int a) on page 18, you claim that a is an argument.
It isn't. It's a parameter. You continually confuse the two in your
tutorial.

Major nit: you claim on page 19 that, when you see a statement like
printf("Hello\n"); the address of the first element is passed to printf
(which is true), but you then say that "the array can be modified by the
function you are calling". But the printf function takes const char * as
its first parameter. It cannot modify the array whose first element's
address is passed, except by violent means, such as casting away the
constness.

Medium nit: compilers exist which pre-date C99 and for which their
implementors, at the time of release, correctly claimed conformance to ANSI
C. On page 22, you give a list of headers which *all* "ANSI compliant" C
compilers provide. So a reader, learning C from your tutorial but using an
early Borland or Microsoft compiler, is going to be very confused by your
list. They will also be thrown by your occasional for(int i = ...) code.

Major nit: On page 24, "char *argv[] This is an array..." It isn't. It's a
pointer.



--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: normal service will be restored as soon as possible. Please do not
adjust your email clients.
 
Reply With Quote
 
jacob navia
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      11-15-2006
Richard Heathfield wrote:
> jacob navia said:
>
>
>>Richard Heathfield wrote:
>>
>>>jacob navia said:
>>>
>>><snip>
>>>
>>>>Download the tutorial.pdf.
>>>
>>>
>>>Have you yet fixed the bugs in that tutorial that were pointed out last
>>>time you pushed it?
>>>

>>
>>Yes, I hope so.

>
>
> Upthread, you said:
>
> "Download the tutorial.pdf. It has a complete description of C"
>
> The tutorial says:
>
> "this is not a full-fledged introduction to all of C." and "there isn't here
> a description of all the features of the language".
>
> I spot a contradiction, don't you?


It could be a contradiction, but actually after writing that sentence
(when I started the tutorial project) I went on to a complete
description of every feature. This started with the big tables where I
describe ALL operators, syntax quircks, preprocessor stuff, etc.

A fair description would be a "almost complete description"
>
> Anyway, here are the next half-dozen bugs for you. But you might find it
> easier to find someone who knows C, and get them to go through the whole
> thing, fixing all the bugs in one fell swoop.
>
>
> Minor nit: on page 16, strictly speaking the argument to your printf call is
> the result of evaluating "Hello\n" - and that result is a pointer, not a
> string.
>


It is a pointer to a string. OK.

> Medium nit: merely saying that the return value from main is optional is to
> miss an opportunity to explain why main returns a value, and what that
> value is used for.
>


True, I will add that.

> Medium nit: For int fn(int a) on page 18, you claim that a is an argument.
> It isn't. It's a parameter. You continually confuse the two in your
> tutorial.
>


Parameter is from the function's point of view, argument is from the
calling function's point of view... Is that very important?


> Major nit: you claim on page 19 that, when you see a statement like
> printf("Hello\n"); the address of the first element is passed to printf
> (which is true), but you then say that "the array can be modified by the
> function you are calling". But the printf function takes const char * as
> its first parameter. It cannot modify the array whose first element's
> address is passed, except by violent means, such as casting away the
> constness.
>


Yes in the case of printf you are right. I will use another example.


> Medium nit: compilers exist which pre-date C99 and for which their
> implementors, at the time of release, correctly claimed conformance to ANSI
> C. On page 22, you give a list of headers which *all* "ANSI compliant" C
> compilers provide. So a reader, learning C from your tutorial but using an
> early Borland or Microsoft compiler, is going to be very confused by your
> list. They will also be thrown by your occasional for(int i = ...) code.
>


Here we disagree. I mean as ANSI compliant compilers that conform to the
current ANSI standard for the C language: C99.

> Major nit: On page 24, "char *argv[] This is an array..." It isn't. It's a
> pointer.
>


It is a pointer to an array of pointers.

Normally the arguments are accessed using array notation (argv[2]). But
eternal confusion in C between pointers and arrays will be difficult
to explain. See our other discussion yesterday about array/pointers
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
5 Excellent Downloadable eBooks To Teach Yourself Linux victor NZ Computing 22 08-17-2009 11:54 AM
Help Help Help Pentax S5i Help needed (Please) The Martian Digital Photography 14 06-20-2008 07:56 AM
Downloadable Vista Ultimate language packs direct links =?Utf-8?B?Q2FybG9z?= Windows 64bit 0 10-26-2007 10:25 AM
please help... ...me learn C++ please please please :) KK C++ 2 10-14-2003 02:08 PM



Advertisments