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compilers

 
 
madhura
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      02-14-2006
Hello,
I have a basic question about compilers. What are the different types
of compilers, are they written by different companies, why there are
different names of compilers, what is the purpose, I want to know about
them. Are interpreters of C available, and if yes, how can I get them.
Madhura

 
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Walter Roberson
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      02-14-2006
In article <(E-Mail Removed) .com>,
madhura <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>I have a basic question about compilers. What are the different types
>of compilers,


K&R compliant, C89 compliant, C94 compliant, C99 compliant,
and Broken.

>are they written by different companies,


A number of different companies write C compilers, and the same company
may have several different C compilers out (which may fall into one
or more of the above categories.) There are also a lot of compilers
written by entities other than companies, some more organized than
others.

>why there are different names of compilers,


Why are there different names of anything?? Why is your mother's
name not the same as your father's name or your name, and why
do your neighbours have different names than those?

>what is the purpose, I want to know about
>them. Are interpreters of C available, and if yes, how can I get them.


There is at least 1 C interpreter available, and I would imagine
that you could find out more about it in the C FAQ which is regularily
posted and cited in this newsgroup .
--
Okay, buzzwords only. Two syllables, tops. -- Laurie Anderson
 
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Ian Collins
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      02-14-2006
madhura wrote:
> Hello,
> I have a basic question about compilers. What are the different types
> of compilers, are they written by different companies, why there are
> different names of compilers, what is the purpose, I want to know about
> them. Are interpreters of C available, and if yes, how can I get them.
> Madhura
>

Different compilers are written for different platforms and deployment
targets.

If you have specific questions about your environment, post it on a
group dedicated to that environment.

Why would you want an interpretor for a compiled language?

--
Ian Collins.
 
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Malcolm
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      02-14-2006

"Ian Collins" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote
>
> Why would you want an interpretor for a compiled language?
>

Because an interpreter can be easier to write than a compiler, it may also
be easier to detect certain problems with programs, like memory leaks.
It also enables you to run the program on any platform with a compiler for
the interpreter. With C this isn't much of a practical advantage, but if you
have your own pet language you want to become the next hot technology, it
might help to have an interpreter written in an inferior but more common
language.


 
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tmp123
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      02-14-2006
Ian Collins wrote:
> madhura wrote:
> > them. Are interpreters of C available, and if yes, how can I get them.
> > Madhura

>
> Why would you want an interpretor for a compiled language?


(Sorry if this question has an obvious answer); There are anything in
the C standard that mades mandatory that C was a compiled language?

 
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Jordan Abel
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      02-14-2006
On 2006-02-14, tmp123 <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Ian Collins wrote:
>> madhura wrote:
>> > them. Are interpreters of C available, and if yes, how can I get them.
>> > Madhura

>>
>> Why would you want an interpretor for a compiled language?

>
> (Sorry if this question has an obvious answer); There are anything in
> the C standard that mades mandatory that C was a compiled language?


There's something about the paradigm of "translation" that tends to make
it a better fit, but nothing absolute
 
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Eric Sosman
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      02-14-2006


tmp123 wrote On 02/14/06 17:28,:
> Ian Collins wrote:
>
>>madhura wrote:
>>
>>>them. Are interpreters of C available, and if yes, how can I get them.
>>>Madhura

>>
>>Why would you want an interpretor for a compiled language?

>
>
> (Sorry if this question has an obvious answer); There are anything in
> the C standard that mades mandatory that C was a compiled language?


The Standard requires (5.1.1.1) that it be possible
to "translate" isolated segments of C source at different
times, to retain the results of "translation" in files
and libraries, and to "link" those results into executable
(or perhaps executING) programs still later. I think we
can take "translate" to be a synonym for "compile," so in
that sense C is indeed a "compiled language."

However, that doesn't mean C can't also be interpreted!
The Standard does not describe the nature of the output of
translation, nor the mechanism that causes the program to
"do stuff" at run-time. A compiler that emits code for an
interpreter to execute isn't ruled out. In fact, it's done
all the time, from one viewpoint anyhow: If a program is
running on a microcoded machine, is it running "natively"
or is it being "interpreted" by the microcode?

--
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)

 
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Keith Thompson
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      02-14-2006
Eric Sosman <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
[snip]
> However, that doesn't mean C can't also be interpreted!
> The Standard does not describe the nature of the output of
> translation, nor the mechanism that causes the program to
> "do stuff" at run-time. A compiler that emits code for an
> interpreter to execute isn't ruled out. In fact, it's done
> all the time, from one viewpoint anyhow: If a program is
> running on a microcoded machine, is it running "natively"
> or is it being "interpreted" by the microcode?


Sure, but a compiler that generates some form of code that's then
interpreted is a compiler -- and the interpreter itself isn't a C
interpreter, it's an interpreter for the generated code (P-code,
J-code, whatever).

It would be theoretically possible to create a true C interpreter, one
that would interpret C source code without translating it to some
lower-level form. It would be easier to translate the C code on the
fly to some internal form that's then interpreted (similar to the way
Perl works).

--
Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) (E-Mail Removed) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
 
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osmium
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      02-15-2006
"Ian Collins" wrote:

> Why would you want an interpretor for a compiled language?


Some people consider that a painless way to learn the syntax of a new
language. The instant and effortless feedback has a lot of appeal. Once
you learn it, you switch to using a compiler.


 
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Neil
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      02-15-2006
madhura wrote:
> Hello,
> I have a basic question about compilers. What are the different types
> of compilers, are they written by different companies, why there are
> different names of compilers, what is the purpose, I want to know about
> them. Are interpreters of C available, and if yes, how can I get them.
> Madhura
>

The Herb Shlit C reference has the source code for a C Interpreter in
the back.
 
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