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pow(2, 1/2) != pow(2, 0.5) problem

 
 
Richard Bos
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      06-20-2005
Joe Wright <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Gordon Burditt wrote:


> >>And I'm quite miffed that there is no stardate conversion
> >>specifier for strftime.

> >
> > Is there a known formula for that which all Trekkies will agree on?
> > There is a problem with the common Unix 32-bit time_t implementation,
> > which runs out in 2106 (if you make it unsigned) or 2038 (if it's
> > signed). However, nothing in ANSI C says time_t has to be 32 bits.

>
> And nothing to say it must be integral seconds. Why not double? With
> 53-bit precision and 2 ^ +-1024 range, we should have interesting times
> pretty well covered, from millions of years to small fractions of
> nanoseconds.


And if you find a continuity error in Star Trek, you can blame it on
floating point rounding.

> And I'm the first to think about and suggest double for time_t, right?


Wrong.

Richard
 
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glen herrmannsfeldt
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      06-20-2005

Walter Roberson wrote:

>If you are going to talk about "classical" interpretations
>and "familiar symbols", then Oberon does *not* "get it right".
>The "classical" meaning of / (solidus), dating back hundreds of
>years, is as a seperator between shilling and pence in writing currency.
>The use of solidus as meaning division only goes back a little over
>a hundred years according to OED. The use of the solidus as
>integer division in C (1972) is directly taken from the same use
>in Kerninghan's B (1970) -- predating the decimalization of
>UK coinage in 1971.


Integer division with an integer quotient likely came from
Fortran before B and C.

-- glen

 
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Alan Balmer
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      06-20-2005
On Mon, 20 Jun 2005 14:20:25 -0700, glen herrmannsfeldt
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
>Walter Roberson wrote:
>
>>If you are going to talk about "classical" interpretations
>>and "familiar symbols", then Oberon does *not* "get it right".
>>The "classical" meaning of / (solidus), dating back hundreds of
>>years, is as a seperator between shilling and pence in writing currency.


Dozens of references claim that the symbol dates back to ancient Rome,
somewhat before shillings and pence, I think.

OTOH, every one of the dozens of references I found is a copy of the
exact same article (long live plagiarism!) and I wonder if the
unacknowledged original author was confusing it with the coin of the
same name.

>>The use of solidus as meaning division only goes back a little over
>>a hundred years according to OED. The use of the solidus as
>>integer division in C (1972) is directly taken from the same use
>>in Kerninghan's B (1970) -- predating the decimalization of
>>UK coinage in 1971.

>
>Integer division with an integer quotient likely came from
>Fortran before B and C.
>
>-- glen


--
Al Balmer
Balmer Consulting
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)
 
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