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Dust on sensor

 
 
frederick
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      03-01-2007
Jørn Dahl-Stamnes wrote:
> frederick wrote:
>> It is dust/dirt on your sensor.
>> I reckon some of the "welded dust" is sticky pollens from flowers - not
>> the usual airborne pollens that cause hay fever etc.
>> Make a cleaning wand from plastic.
>> Use pec pads - never touch the pad with your hands.
>> Attach the pec pad to the wand with tape - as explained by the
>> copperhill method web site.
>> Use methanol or as an alternative so-called "100%" grade isopropynol is
>> usually readily available from pharmacists. Isopropynol is a little
>> slower evaporating than methanol, but works fine.
>> Get an old microscope slide or similar small piece of glass to practice
>> on. Only a drop or two of methanol/isopropynol is enough - and don't
>> forget to let it soak in for 30 secs or so before wiping.
>> Look closely, and the "right speed" to draw the wand across the glass is
>> when you can only just see a trail of alcohol trailing behind, and
>> evaporating quickly from the surface. Practice getting to one end of the
>> sensor filter, altering the angle that you hold the wand, then wiping it
>> back the other way.
>> Throw away the brush - they are bad news. In the field, I use a small
>> (3ml) disposable plastic pipette to blow the odd speck away. You can aim
>> right at the speck, and if you slip (which I've never done) the soft
>> plastic isn't going to damage the filter. Just remember never do it in
>> the field if your battery is low.

>
> Thanks. This sounds like a very good advice. I'll try to get some 100% pure
> methanol and try this.
>

If methanol is hard to obtain, then iso-propynol is good.
A further tip is when looking at the sensor surface, it's very hard to
focus on it. I find it's best to focus on an edge of it, then scan your
eyes over it. Generally any dust large enough to be visible in a photo
at normal apertures can be seen in good light with the naked eye.
Don't be afraid to use a little pressure - similar to what you might use
holding a ball-point pen. If you can see the stuck on spot, then you
might be able to work on that area, but will need to finish by wiping
the entire surface.
Never use a pec pad saturated in methanol/isopropynol. I have heard of
people doing this and ending up with seepage behind the filter surface.
Aside from that risk, too much doesn't clean the surface well - you
can see this when you practice - hold the glass in good light against a
dark background. One or two small drops is plenty - and don't forget to
let it soak up before using.
If you're going to make a wand, then avoid plasticised PVC. I am
guessing that the alcohol may leach additives from the PVC and cause
smears. I made a wand using some polyethylene sheet, cut to size and
shape, beveled the wiping edge, and held securely in the blade holder of
a small stylus knife. Works like a charm.

Good luck.
 
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=?ISO-8859-1?Q?J=F8rn?= Dahl-Stamnes
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      03-01-2007
frederick wrote:

> If methanol is hard to obtain, then iso-propynol is good.


What about other kind of solvents? I got a big bottle of aceton (not sure
about the english/us name, but it is the active solvent in nail polish
remover)?

Something say me that I should avoide it...

> A further tip is when looking at the sensor surface, it's very hard to
> focus on it. I find it's best to focus on an edge of it, then scan your
> eyes over it. Generally any dust large enough to be visible in a photo
> at normal apertures can be seen in good light with the naked eye.
> Don't be afraid to use a little pressure - similar to what you might use
> holding a ball-point pen. If you can see the stuck on spot, then you
> might be able to work on that area, but will need to finish by wiping
> the entire surface.
> Never use a pec pad saturated in methanol/isopropynol. I have heard of
> people doing this and ending up with seepage behind the filter surface.
> Aside from that risk, too much doesn't clean the surface well - you
> can see this when you practice - hold the glass in good light against a
> dark background. One or two small drops is plenty - and don't forget to
> let it soak up before using.


I use q-tip like sticks made of wood. They are for medical use.

--
Jørn Dahl-Stamnes
http://www.dahl-stamnes.net/dahls/
 
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Ed Ruf
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      03-01-2007
On Thu, 01 Mar 2007 16:16:33 +0100, in rec.photo.digital Jørn
Dahl-Stamnes <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>frederick wrote:
>
>> If methanol is hard to obtain, then iso-propynol is good.

>
>What about other kind of solvents? I got a big bottle of aceton (not sure
>about the english/us name, but it is the active solvent in nail polish
>remover)?


NO!

>I use q-tip like sticks made of wood. They are for medical use.


This could be part of you problems. I wouldn't something that is this
loosely held. Do yourself a favor and get some Sensor swabs to start
and then PecPads to re-wrap the plastic spatulas for reuse.
-
Ed Ruf ((E-Mail Removed))
http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photog...ral/index.html
 
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M-M
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      03-01-2007
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
Jørn Dahl-Stamnes <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> > If methanol is hard to obtain, then iso-propynol is good.

>
> What about other kind of solvents? I got a big bottle of aceton (not sure
> about the english/us name, but it is the active solvent in nail polish
> remover)?
>
> Something say me that I should avoide it...



Acetone will dissolve many plastics.
--
m-m
 
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J. Clarke
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      03-01-2007
On Thu, 01 Mar 2007 16:16:33 +0100, Jørn Dahl-Stamnes
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>frederick wrote:
>
>> If methanol is hard to obtain, then iso-propynol is good.

>
>What about other kind of solvents? I got a big bottle of aceton (not sure
>about the english/us name, but it is the active solvent in nail polish
>remover)?
>
>Something say me that I should avoide it...


It's a fairly powerful solvent that will dissolve many common
plastics. I would avoid it for any electronics unless the
manufacturer specifically said to use it.

>> A further tip is when looking at the sensor surface, it's very hard to
>> focus on it. I find it's best to focus on an edge of it, then scan your
>> eyes over it. Generally any dust large enough to be visible in a photo
>> at normal apertures can be seen in good light with the naked eye.
>> Don't be afraid to use a little pressure - similar to what you might use
>> holding a ball-point pen. If you can see the stuck on spot, then you
>> might be able to work on that area, but will need to finish by wiping
>> the entire surface.
>> Never use a pec pad saturated in methanol/isopropynol. I have heard of
>> people doing this and ending up with seepage behind the filter surface.
>> Aside from that risk, too much doesn't clean the surface well - you
>> can see this when you practice - hold the glass in good light against a
>> dark background. One or two small drops is plenty - and don't forget to
>> let it soak up before using.

>
>I use q-tip like sticks made of wood. They are for medical use.

 
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=?ISO-8859-1?Q?J=F8rn?= Dahl-Stamnes
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      03-01-2007
Ed Ruf wrote:

>>I use q-tip like sticks made of wood. They are for medical use.

>
> This could be part of you problems. I wouldn't something that is this
> loosely held. Do yourself a favor and get some Sensor swabs to start
> and then PecPads to re-wrap the plastic spatulas for reuse.


I bought them from Visible Dust... AFAIK they don't sell things that would
cause problem... or?

--
Jørn Dahl-Stamnes
http://www.dahl-stamnes.net/dahls/
 
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=?iso-8859-1?Q?Rita_=C4_Berkowitz?=
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      03-01-2007
Jørn Dahl-Stamnes wrote:

> What about other kind of solvents? I got a big bottle of aceton (not
> sure about the english/us name, but it is the active solvent in nail
> polish remover)?


You would be better off using some methylene chloride or methyl ethyl
ketone. I can't believe you're still dicking around with this. You were
already told how to attack this problem, do it or send the camera back to
Nikon and let them do it. Of course, you could always get your camera
retrofitted with Nikon's sensor cleaner.

http://www.geocities.com/ritaberk2006/sensor.htm







Rita

 
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frederick
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      03-02-2007
Rita Ä Berkowitz wrote:
> Jørn Dahl-Stamnes wrote:
>
>> What about other kind of solvents? I got a big bottle of aceton (not
>> sure about the english/us name, but it is the active solvent in nail
>> polish remover)?

>
> You would be better off using some methylene chloride or methyl ethyl
> ketone. I can't believe you're still dicking around with this. You were
> already told how to attack this problem, do it or send the camera back to
> Nikon and let them do it. Of course, you could always get your camera
> retrofitted with Nikon's sensor cleaner.
>
> http://www.geocities.com/ritaberk2006/sensor.htm
>
>


I presume that you're joking about the methylene chloride or MEK.
(Don't use it)
 
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=?ISO-8859-1?Q?J=F8rn?= Dahl-Stamnes
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      03-02-2007
Rita Ä Berkowitz wrote:

> Jørn Dahl-Stamnes wrote:
>
>> What about other kind of solvents? I got a big bottle of aceton (not
>> sure about the english/us name, but it is the active solvent in nail
>> polish remover)?

>
> You would be better off using some methylene chloride or methyl ethyl
> ketone. I can't believe you're still dicking around with this. You were
> already told how to attack this problem, do it or send the camera back to
> Nikon and let them do it. Of course, you could always get your camera
> retrofitted with Nikon's sensor cleaner.


Send back a Canon camera to Nikon? You must be joking.

A friend of my with a Nikon D70 mailed his camera back to Nikon to get the
sensor cleaned. 2+ weeks without the camera. It returned with a nearly 200
USD bill for the job!!!

--
Jørn Dahl-Stamnes
http://www.dahl-stamnes.net/dahls/
 
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