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/Reliable/ backup solution for home?

 
 
Paul W
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      02-15-2007
Hello,

If I need to store 100s of GBs of photos and I need duplicate backup
(mirrored), what would be the most reliable home backup solution?

Thanks,
Paul W.

 
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Lars Forslin
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      02-15-2007
Maybe RAID level 1 would be right for you?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redunda...ependent_disks
/Lars

"Paul W" <(E-Mail Removed)> skrev i meddelandet
news:(E-Mail Removed) ups.com...
> Hello,
>
> If I need to store 100s of GBs of photos and I need duplicate backup
> (mirrored), what would be the most reliable home backup solution?
>
> Thanks,
> Paul W.
>



 
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Bob Willard
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      02-15-2007
Lars Forslin wrote:
> Maybe RAID level 1 would be right for you?
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redunda...ependent_disks
> /Lars
>
> "Paul W" <(E-Mail Removed)> skrev i meddelandet
> news:(E-Mail Removed) ups.com...
>
>>Hello,
>>
>>If I need to store 100s of GBs of photos and I need duplicate backup
>>(mirrored), what would be the most reliable home backup solution?
>>
>>Thanks,
>> Paul W.
>>

>
>
>


RAID1 only gives you some protection against failure of the physical HD,
a device with a typical MTBF of roughly a hundred centuries. RAID1 gives
no protection against failure of any other hardware component of a PC, or
protection against failure of the OS or other software, or protection
against malware, or protection against environmental problems (brownout,
heatwave, fire, earthquake, etc.), or protection against human aggression
(theft, sabotage, etc.), or protection against the most common cause of
file loss -- fumble fingers.

RAID1 is a great tool for professionals to deploy with servers. For SOHO
PCs, RAID1 is IMHO mostly used for bragging rights.
--
Cheers, Bob
 
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J. Clarke
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      02-15-2007
On Thu, 15 Feb 2007 12:11:54 +0100, "Lars Forslin"
<lars.privat_nospamdevice@monarda_nospamdevice.s e> wrote:

>Maybe RAID level 1 would be right for you?
>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redunda...ependent_disks


RAID isn't backup. Its primary utility is reliability of the primary
system--when a disk fails the system stays up. If Junior decides to
wipe the system or the cat pees in it or somebody breaks in and walks
off with the computer you're not covered.

Backup deals with those eventualities.

One way to work is to set up a machine in a separate location that is
synchronized regularly with the main machine. That doesn't cover you
for a flood or for the house burning down but it does cover you for
lesser disasters.

Another is to put a removable drive caddy in your machine and use
several hard disks as backup devices in a rotation system. Keep one
offsite and you're covered for fire, but not necessarily for
flood--keep it in a Pelican case and you're covered for that too if
you can find it after.

>/Lars
>
>"Paul W" <(E-Mail Removed)> skrev i meddelandet
>news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
>> Hello,
>>
>> If I need to store 100s of GBs of photos and I need duplicate backup
>> (mirrored), what would be the most reliable home backup solution?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Paul W.
>>

>

 
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Scott Schuckert
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      02-15-2007
In article <(E-Mail Removed). com>, Paul
W <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> If I need to store 100s of GBs of photos and I need duplicate backup
> (mirrored), what would be the most reliable home backup solution?


I'm a bit of a backup nut; over the years I've used tape, removable
cartridge, CD, and DVD. My current recommended solution is an external
HD with appropriate backup software. For example, I recently picked up
a Seagate 300 GB external drive for $100. FireWire, if available on
your computer, is a bit faster and more stable than USB 2.0.

The backup software I use is Retrospect; it uses one backup set rather
than the more usual primary/incremental system. It also keeps all
chronological versions of a document. That is, if you edit a file
repeatedly you can retrieve the version from your choice of dates.

I leave my drive plugged in, but you don't have to. Attach/turn on the
drive, run the Retrospect script, tell Windows to detach the drive, and
turn it off. For a little more safety, move the external drive away
from your computer (in case it explodes) Seriously, since your backup
device is offline 99% of the time, it's pretty safe.
 
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Dr. Joel M. Hoffman
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      02-15-2007
>If I need to store 100s of GBs of photos and I need duplicate backup
>(mirrored), what would be the most reliable home backup solution?


An external HD is your best bet.

Keep all of your photos in one directory (with subdirectories, of
course), and backup that directory to an external drive.

To do it right, you need at least three external drives. You rotate
through the drives as you backup, using a different one, say, each
week. This way, the most you can lose is a week's worth of data, even
if your computer crashes during a backup, destroying your ingternal HD
and the external one. You'll still have a week-old backup, and, just
in *case* somehow that doesn't work, you'll have a two-week backup,
too.

If one week is too much data to lose, you can backup everything every
day, or, better, run incremental backups daily.

-Joel

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Marvin
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      02-15-2007
Scott Schuckert wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed). com>, Paul
> W <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> If I need to store 100s of GBs of photos and I need duplicate backup
>> (mirrored), what would be the most reliable home backup solution?

>
> I'm a bit of a backup nut; over the years I've used tape, removable
> cartridge, CD, and DVD. My current recommended solution is an external
> HD with appropriate backup software. For example, I recently picked up
> a Seagate 300 GB external drive for $100. FireWire, if available on
> your computer, is a bit faster and more stable than USB 2.0.
>
> The backup software I use is Retrospect; it uses one backup set rather
> than the more usual primary/incremental system. It also keeps all
> chronological versions of a document. That is, if you edit a file
> repeatedly you can retrieve the version from your choice of dates.
>
> I leave my drive plugged in, but you don't have to. Attach/turn on the
> drive, run the Retrospect script, tell Windows to detach the drive, and
> turn it off. For a little more safety, move the external drive away
> from your computer (in case it explodes) Seriously, since your backup
> device is offline 99% of the time, it's pretty safe.


I recently bought a 160 GB external HD for $50 after rebate,
and set it up to be used as backup for the two computers in
our home network. For a start, I'm using the Smart Backup
software from jam-software.com. I haven't used it long
enough to rate it, but it does seem to work well.

I plug it in when it is to be used, and then disconnect it
using the Safely Remove Hardware utility in Win XP.
 
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Dave Cohen
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-15-2007
Paul W wrote:
> Hello,
>
> If I need to store 100s of GBs of photos and I need duplicate backup
> (mirrored), what would be the most reliable home backup solution?
>
> Thanks,
> Paul W.
>


I bought an external dvd burner when external hd's were still pricey, so
I don't follow my own advice.
Today, an external usb hd, a big one. Comodo have a freeware backup
utility, maybe not the best but will do the job with option of full
backup, differential and at scheduled intervals (they call it synchronized).
If you are really paranoid you could get a second usb hd, if you wait
for a sale they are ridiculously cheap.
DVD still has it's uses, but you invariably get a burner with a new pc
anyway.
Dave Cohen
 
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ray
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-15-2007
On Thu, 15 Feb 2007 02:31:38 -0800, Paul W wrote:

> Hello,
>
> If I need to store 100s of GBs of photos and I need duplicate backup
> (mirrored), what would be the most reliable home backup solution?
>
> Thanks,
> Paul W.


I would suggest archiving to DVD as you go.

 
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Neil Ellwood
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      02-15-2007
On 15 Feb 2007 02:31:38 -0800
"Paul W" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Hello,
>
> If I need to store 100s of GBs of photos and I need duplicate backup
> (mirrored), what would be the most reliable home backup solution?
>
> Thanks,
> Paul W.
>

Google for this group and look back through the archives.

--
Neil
Reverse 'r' and 'a', delete 'l' for email.
 
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