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NIKON - MADE IN ?!?

 
 
Just D
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      02-15-2007
"JohnR66"
> Perhaps, but the manual assembly is limited to putting the compenents of
> the camera together. It all depends on the design for the covers and the
> engeneering to properly makean accurate fit. If screw holes don't line up
> causing a poor fit, it more of fault of the mold design. The person
> putting the screw in has no control over that. Lens assembly is a critical
> area where design and assembly are critical to good performance.


Even if the manual assembly is limited I'd say the country affects the final
product too much. I have no idea in particular about Nikons, but I made a
low-level comparison of different hard drives (Quantum Fireball) created in
a different countries many years ago when this brand was still alive. One
smart Russian guy (from Fidonet ) wrote a program to show the number of
defective clusters hid in the IDE HD reserved area. For those who have no
idea what does it mean just a few words. I'm not talking now about the
primitive first generation of the first hard drives. The more advanced IDE
drives are smart enough to hide the defective sectors even on the fly
replacing (actually remapping them) with the ones taken from the reserved
space on the same hard drive. All hard drives are having bad sectors, maybe
it's a secret for most of the people, but it's true. When you buy a new hard
drive these bad sectors are usually remapped so that you will never be able
to notice that until you use a low-lever utility able to read the remapped
info from the hard drive showing the map of the bad and remapped sectors.
This tool should work from DOS only, no Windows or other systems are not
allowed because this utility works with the HD controller directly. Another
one method around this^ tool to get the quality of the hard drive pretty
quickly is the graphical tool also working from DOS without cache or
something. This tool was just reading the hard drive cylinder by cylinder
showing the reading speed. All latest hard drives are having Zones, that's
clear and all these zones are visible as the stairs, jumps on the graph
provided by the second too. But there is another kind of jumps. IF the hard
drive sees the call to the defective sector which is remapped it
automatically jumps to the remapped sector, reads it and then returns back
to the next one. If that happens then we see the gaps on the graph,
sometimes very significant gaps decreasing the reading speed. Also if the
hard drive is not quiet enough we'll head these jumps after some experience.
That's it. SO what I got testing these hard drives?

1. Japan - took two hard drives, 3.4% and 4.2% of the reserved space was
remapped, so almost the whole reserved space was not used, very good quality
of the drives.
2. Ireland - took three hard drives, 12%, 14% and 17% of reserved space was
used for remapping of the bad sectors.
3. Malaysia - Pretty close to 2^.
4. India - took two hard drives, 37% and 43% of the reserved space was
already used. In general very noisy hard drives since a lot of jumps to the
remapped sectors. Also these jumps decrease the total life of these drives,
not only affect the real read/write speed.

You can make your own conclusions yourselves. Just keep in mind that the
factories assembling these hard drives were just located in different
countries. All hard drives were of the same model, brand new, just taken
from the store.

I don't think that it's possible to significantly hide the sensor defects,
but the dust, the quality of the assembling, etc, could be a serious issue.

Just D.


 
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aniramca@yahoo.com
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      02-16-2007
On Feb 15, 5:59 pm, "Just D" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> "JohnR66"
>
> > Perhaps, but the manual assembly is limited to putting the compenents of
> > the camera together. It all depends on the design for the covers and the
> > engeneering to properly makean accurate fit. If screw holes don't line up
> > causing a poor fit, it more of fault of the mold design. The person
> > putting the screw in has no control over that. Lens assembly is a critical
> > area where design and assembly are critical to good performance.

>
> Even if the manual assembly is limited I'd say the country affects the final
> product too much. I have no idea in particular about Nikons, but I made a
> low-level comparison of different hard drives (Quantum Fireball) created in
> a different countries many years ago when this brand was still alive. One
> smart Russian guy (from Fidonet ) wrote a program to show the number of
> defective clusters hid in the IDE HD reserved area. For those who have no
> idea what does it mean just a few words. I'm not talking now about the
> primitive first generation of the first hard drives. The more advanced IDE
> drives are smart enough to hide the defective sectors even on the fly
> replacing (actually remapping them) with the ones taken from the reserved
> space on the same hard drive. All hard drives are having bad sectors, maybe
> it's a secret for most of the people, but it's true. When you buy a new hard
> drive these bad sectors are usually remapped so that you will never be able
> to notice that until you use a low-lever utility able to read the remapped
> info from the hard drive showing the map of the bad and remapped sectors.
> This tool should work from DOS only, no Windows or other systems are not
> allowed because this utility works with the HD controller directly. Another
> one method around this^ tool to get the quality of the hard drive pretty
> quickly is the graphical tool also working from DOS without cache or
> something. This tool was just reading the hard drive cylinder by cylinder
> showing the reading speed. All latest hard drives are having Zones, that's
> clear and all these zones are visible as the stairs, jumps on the graph
> provided by the second too. But there is another kind of jumps. IF the hard
> drive sees the call to the defective sector which is remapped it
> automatically jumps to the remapped sector, reads it and then returns back
> to the next one. If that happens then we see the gaps on the graph,
> sometimes very significant gaps decreasing the reading speed. Also if the
> hard drive is not quiet enough we'll head these jumps after some experience.
> That's it. SO what I got testing these hard drives?
>
> 1. Japan - took two hard drives, 3.4% and 4.2% of the reserved space was
> remapped, so almost the whole reserved space was not used, very good quality
> of the drives.
> 2. Ireland - took three hard drives, 12%, 14% and 17% of reserved space was
> used for remapping of the bad sectors.
> 3. Malaysia - Pretty close to 2^.
> 4. India - took two hard drives, 37% and 43% of the reserved space was
> already used. In general very noisy hard drives since a lot of jumps to the
> remapped sectors. Also these jumps decrease the total life of these drives,
> not only affect the real read/write speed.
>
> You can make your own conclusions yourselves. Just keep in mind that the
> factories assembling these hard drives were just located in different
> countries. All hard drives were of the same model, brand new, just taken
> from the store.
>
> I don't think that it's possible to significantly hide the sensor defects,
> but the dust, the quality of the assembling, etc, could be a serious issue.
>
> Just D.


That was quite an explanation. Anyway, it shows that there are
variations between quality from plant in one country and the other. It
may just be a matter of management, and good quality control. It boils
down for prestige, cost and money. It the product is your centrepiece,
you want to have it near your design center, in case problem of
retooling, etc can be reported, redesigned and changed quickly.
Consider this:
1. In the 1970s, Australian Holden car was assembled in another
country. But quality was bad in the assembly line. Instead of 6 nuts,
they only place 5 nuts (perhaps they keep the extra nut and sell in
the market). as a result, Holden name dropped and noone wants to buy
that car in the country. Even until now, the Holden name appears to
have negative impression of poor quality.
2. How do you know that the assembly line in the third world country
for a reknown "widget" brand "Soho", in which strict quality control
was used. At the end of the day, the local company also does
"moonlighting", and produces identical "widget" named 'Soko". However,
during the shift, they resupply the nuts with inferior quality nuts.
At the end of the shift, before the company will start with the "Soho"
line again, some of those inferior nuts left in the bin, and the new
worker uses them for the "soho" widget. As a result, some Soho widget
uses inferior parts and may fail sooner.... This is just fictional
example. Names are fictional, but it can happen. Greedy people wants
to make a buck... using the tools from "Soho" to make "Soko" will make
them rich.... and no one from Soho management in Japan knows, as it is
far away from home. They did not realize that the factory runs 24
hours a day, instead the regular 12 hours.

 
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