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Newbie Question About Color Balance Problem in D70s ?

 
 
Magnusfarce
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      01-22-2007
I recently acquired a D70s and used it to shoot some indoor sporting event
pictures this weekend that I'm not satisfied with. At times, with no
adjustment to any camera settings, the color tone shifted back and forth
between a very cool or blue tone to a rather warm or yellow overall tone. I
suspect that this has something to do with the automatic color balance
features of the camera (perhaps a slight shift in background between
pictures is causing this to happen). Can someone confirm if this is the
area I need to study, and if so, recommend a good article on line where I
can learn more about it? TIA

- Magnusfarce


 
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David Dyer-Bennet
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      01-22-2007
Magnusfarce wrote:
> I recently acquired a D70s and used it to shoot some indoor sporting event
> pictures this weekend that I'm not satisfied with. At times, with no
> adjustment to any camera settings, the color tone shifted back and forth
> between a very cool or blue tone to a rather warm or yellow overall tone. I
> suspect that this has something to do with the automatic color balance
> features of the camera (perhaps a slight shift in background between
> pictures is causing this to happen). Can someone confirm if this is the
> area I need to study, and if so, recommend a good article on line where I
> can learn more about it? TIA


More likely to be the light source. Daylight is very different from
tungsten light, which is very different from long-tube fluorescent
light, which is very different from mercury-vapor lights (as found in
some gymnasiums, say). The camera can to some degree adjust for this
automatically, but not always perfectly. And if the scene has multiple
light sources (of different types, that is) it gets really *very*
complicated; getting all the colors right is, at that point, no longer
on the table, just trying to find a compromise that's visually tolerable.

Manual white balance, especially custom white balance, might help
(though of course once you go to manual, you're then responsible for
adjusting whenever you go to different conditions).
 
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Adrian Boliston
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      01-22-2007
"Magnusfarce" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ...

>I recently acquired a D70s and used it to shoot some indoor sporting event
>pictures this weekend that I'm not satisfied with. At times, with no
>adjustment to any camera settings, the color tone shifted back and forth
>between a very cool or blue tone to a rather warm or yellow overall tone.
>I suspect that this has something to do with the automatic color balance
>features of the camera (perhaps a slight shift in background between
>pictures is causing this to happen). Can someone confirm if this is the
>area I need to study, and if so, recommend a good article on line where I
>can learn more about it? TIA


I don't like the sound of "auto colour balance" and have never even tried it
with my d70s as just the sound of it sounds like trouble. Simply dial in
the WB on the camera as you can fine tune it later in Capture (or whatever
raw converter you use).

cheers adrian www.boliston.co.uk


 
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Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!)
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      01-23-2007
On Mon, 22 Jan 2007 21:42:28 -0000, in rec.photo.digital "Adrian Boliston"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Simply dial in
>the WB on the camera as you can fine tune it later in Capture (or whatever
>raw converter you use).


If you are shooting and processing raw, it matters not what WB setting one
chooses in the camera itself.
--
Ed Ruf ((E-Mail Removed))
http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photog...ral/index.html
 
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Magnusfarce
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      01-23-2007
OP here -

Thanks for the thoughts. I probably should have mentioned that one of the
most obvious cases of this shift in color occurred in a pair of consecutive
shots taken not more than maybe a second apart with the same background.
I'd be happy to e-mail them to one of you for inspection if you think it
would be helpful. Is it likely that this is a problem with the camera?
(BTW, I shoot in a somewhat compressed mode for things like this, as opposed
to raw.)

- Magnusfarce


"Magnusfarce" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ...
>I recently acquired a D70s and used it to shoot some indoor sporting event
>pictures this weekend that I'm not satisfied with. At times, with no
>adjustment to any camera settings, the color tone shifted back and forth
>between a very cool or blue tone to a rather warm or yellow overall tone.
>I suspect that this has something to do with the automatic color balance
>features of the camera (perhaps a slight shift in background between
>pictures is causing this to happen). Can someone confirm if this is the
>area I need to study, and if so, recommend a good article on line where I
>can learn more about it? TIA
>
> - Magnusfarce
>



 
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Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!)
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      01-23-2007
On Mon, 22 Jan 2007 20:26:16 -0800, in rec.photo.digital "Magnusfarce"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>OP here -
>
>Thanks for the thoughts. I probably should have mentioned that one of the
>most obvious cases of this shift in color occurred in a pair of consecutive
>shots taken not more than maybe a second apart with the same background.
>I'd be happy to e-mail them to one of you for inspection if you think it
>would be helpful. Is it likely that this is a problem with the camera?
>(BTW, I shoot in a somewhat compressed mode for things like this, as opposed
>to raw.)


Then I'd guess you where using spot or center-weighted metering.
--
Ed Ruf ((E-Mail Removed))
http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photog...ral/index.html
 
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Magnusfarce
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      01-23-2007
Thanks, I'll look into that. May have more questions as a result.

- Magnusfarce


"Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Mon, 22 Jan 2007 20:26:16 -0800, in rec.photo.digital "Magnusfarce"
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>OP here -
>>
>>Thanks for the thoughts. I probably should have mentioned that one of the
>>most obvious cases of this shift in color occurred in a pair of
>>consecutive
>>shots taken not more than maybe a second apart with the same background.
>>I'd be happy to e-mail them to one of you for inspection if you think it
>>would be helpful. Is it likely that this is a problem with the camera?
>>(BTW, I shoot in a somewhat compressed mode for things like this, as
>>opposed
>>to raw.)

>
> Then I'd guess you where using spot or center-weighted metering.
> --
> Ed Ruf ((E-Mail Removed))
> http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photog...ral/index.html



 
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Adrian Boliston
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      01-23-2007
"Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...

> On Mon, 22 Jan 2007 21:42:28 -0000, in rec.photo.digital "Adrian Boliston"
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Simply dial in
>>the WB on the camera as you can fine tune it later in Capture (or whatever
>>raw converter you use).

>
> If you are shooting and processing raw, it matters not what WB setting one
> chooses in the camera itself.


I aim to get it fairly close using the camera settings so that when I
preview in Nikon View 6 I get something that looks fairly natural.

cheers adrian www.boliston.co.uk


 
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acl
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      01-23-2007

Magnusfarce wrote:
> Thanks, I'll look into that. May have more questions as a result.
>
> - Magnusfarce


Changing metering pattern doesn't affect white balance, only exposure.

Were you shooting under fluorescent lights?

 
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Magnusfarce
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      01-24-2007
This took place in a large gymnasium-type building set up with decent
lighting, but honestly, I never thought to look up. (Guess I need to get
into the habit.)

If I can find out, I'll post. In situations where lighting can be properly
identified, can a filter be used to restore neutral white balance, or would
that be done better through the camera WB settings? Should I be able to
look at a ceiling light and identify its type by color, either now or with
practice?

- Magnusfarce (OP)


"acl" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
>
> Magnusfarce wrote:
>> Thanks, I'll look into that. May have more questions as a result.
>>
>> - Magnusfarce

>
> Changing metering pattern doesn't affect white balance, only exposure.
>
> Were you shooting under fluorescent lights?
>



 
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