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One4All
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      12-28-2006

Arnor Baldvinsson wrote:
> Hi David,
>
> > galleries. How in hell do you get any sense of a photographic vision?
> > Or, do you want/need one? If you don't, just be happy with the birthday
> > parties, school events, etc., etc.

>
> I'm a software developer not a photographer although I hope to, at some
> point, become a photographer. I have _no intentions of doing event
> photography<bg> I'm learning (and while I just turned 45 I have been
> pleasantly surprised at how quickly I pick things up, but then in software
> development I have to keep up with new things all the time) and have given
> myself 5 years to work my way into photography. I'm on month 6! So even if
> I went to a museum or an art gallery I'm just now far enough into it to be
> able to really appreciate what I see.


I'm not sure one "becomes a photographer." I can only speak for myself:
I started using a camera when I was 12 yrs. old. That was 58 yrs. ago.
I've read and studied countless Popular Photography, Modern
Photography, National Geographic, Life, Look, and other magazines, for
starters. I subscribe to several photo mag's to this day, one of which
is about digital photography. I've read many books on photography over
the years, and have tried, tried, tried to incorporate what I've read
into what I see, and seeing is what it's all about. Long ago, there was
the phrase, "the photographer's eye."

That's what you have to develop, and hopefully you will, but it's a
curse, in a way. I never am free to just see a scene for what it is,
but for what it will look like as a framed image, provided the scene
gets my attention. If my camera is not handy (Sometimes I intentionally
leave it behind.), there's a mild agony. It's like seeing a woman who
could be the love of your life and knowing you will never see her
again.

You can develop the photographer's eye, perhaps in a short time.
Incidentally, I think that was the title of a book on photography I
read long ago. You have to relate to the world around you (what other
world is there?) and see, SEE it as filled with wonderful possibilities
within a frame of good composition, good light, and meaningful content.
The light is all, the presence and absence of it. I could go on and on.
Just start reading, not only about photography, but about art, and by
that I mean sculpture and architecture, which are three-dimensional, as
well as two-dimensional painting. BTW, Picasso's work strived to bring
three-dimensions into two-dimensions.

>My step daughter, who is majoring in
> art management, will be here for a week in early January and I plan on
> picking her brain and maybe she can drag me to some interesting galleries or
> something<g>


If you're serious about developing the photographer's eye, your
daughter should not have to drag you to art galleries and museums.
These will be life-blood for you. They are for me. : )

 
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Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)
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      12-28-2006
Scott W wrote:
> Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark) wrote:
> > Eric,

>
>>Sorry to have stirred up such a hornet's nest. The fair thing to
>>do in situations like this is to describe in the photo
>>that the moon was added. Then people can judge for themselves
>>the photo, and it upholds your honesty.

>
> I don't think this is always needed, as example this photo
> http://www.pbase.com/konascott/image/72238481/original
>
> The fact that it is bigger then normal gives it away and I don't think
> anyone would not catch on that
> that it was added.
>
> Scott
>

Hi Scott,
You give people too much credit (or brains).
Never underestimate the stupidity of humans.
(I woke up early and haven't had my coffee yet.
On Halloween when a group of teenagers came to the door,
one commented on what a cute dog my bearded collie was.
I said that's not my dog, thats my son dressed up in
a "Cousin It" costume. She responded "Really!?"
and left thinking that was a person in costume!
Ever watch Jay Leno and "Jaywalking?" Some of those
people aren't faking.

Roger
 
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Arnor Baldvinsson
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      12-28-2006
Hi David,

> I'm not sure one "becomes a photographer." I can only speak for myself:
> I started using a camera when I was 12 yrs. old. That was 58 yrs. ago.


I got my first camera when I was 9. I've been through several cameras
through the years but never had the chance to really get into it. I've been
working with computers for 20 years and thought that was my profession, but
I've always had this strong urge to photograph and now have the opportunity
to work on it as much as possible.

> Just start reading, not only about photography, but about art, and by
> that I mean sculpture and architecture, which are three-dimensional, as


I've been reading everything I can get my hands on. Unfortunately my time
is limited due to work (I work for myself, almost always have) so I don't
have as much time as I would like.

> If you're serious about developing the photographer's eye, your
> daughter should not have to drag you to art galleries and museums.
> These will be life-blood for you. They are for me. : )


Different strokes.
--
Arnor Baldvinsson
San Antonio, Texas


 
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John McWilliams
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      12-28-2006
One4All wrote:
> John McWilliams wrote:
>> One4All wrote:
>>> Arnor Baldvinsson wrote:
>>>
>>>>> identified as "digital print," or something like that. I have no
>>>>> quarrel with digitally manipulated images. The artist must reveal
>>>>> his/her medium. Any digital artist that avoids this is a fraud.
>>> >What about photos that are manipulated on film/print?
>>>
>>> The divide between digital photography and film photography is as
>>> massive as that between film photography and painting.

>> Hardly.
>>
>>> We're talking about art media.

>> You are. And "art media" probably ain't digital photography.

>
> Oh, lord.


That'd be "Lord". But let's dispense with formalities here.

What is it you were unable to articulate?

--
John McWilliams
 
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One4All
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      12-28-2006

John McWilliams wrote:
> One4All wrote:> >
> > Oh, lord.

>
> That'd be "Lord". But let's dispense with formalities here.


The lower case was intentional.
>
> What is it you were unable to articulate?


What is it you don't understand?
>
> --
> John McWilliams


 
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One4All
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      12-29-2006

Eric Miller wrote:
> > So, now, with digital, you can put any element into your composition
> > with a few clicks of a mouse. If you are skillful, which Eric was not,
> > and which Roger exposed, you might get away with it. So much for the
> > incredulity of the American public. All Eric needs to do is identify
> > his work as a digital collage. That is, if he is a true artist.

>
> Lets be clear, I exposed the fact that the moon was added. I didn't have
> to; I could easily have added the same moon to the color image and in
> the same position since the moon was added to the uncropped image as a
> 100% crop from another image taken on the same evening (it's actually an
> eclipse and not a half moon, that's why it looks odd). When I posted the
> image the way I did, nearly two years ago, I had no real intention of
> "fooling" anyone. My sole intention was to make the image a better one.
> It is at the end of a travelogue meant mostly for friends and family and
> not for wide distribution.


I didn't have to add "if he is a true artist," and I apologize for
suggesting you were intentionally deceptive. Your reply has made me
more aware of how a digital image can "morph" beyond its original
purpose (for family/friends vs. wide distribution). I'm also putting
together a DVD of my images for family/friends. I've tweaked tones and
colors in PS, altho not adding anything. I've deleted some distracting
elements to improve the photos. Pre-digital, techniques were taught to
sandwich transparencies in an enlarger to achieve a desired effect. I'm
thinking maybe your fault was in not making the moon more believable to
knowing eyes.

In other words, photography is a medium, unlike oils or watercolors,
that people believe is a true rendition of the original scene when the
shutter was snapped. Somehow, the hand of the photographer is suspect,
as the hand of the painter is not. If the hand of the photographer is
not apparent in a photograph, the image is accepted. It just gets down
to whether the image pleases most people or not.

You're still a damned good photographer.

 
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One4All
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      12-29-2006

Arnor Baldvinsson wrote:
> I've been reading everything I can get my hands on. Unfortunately my time
> is limited due to work (I work for myself, almost always have) so I don't
> have as much time as I would like.


While I was working (retired, now) I joined a local photo club & was
amazed (this is pre-digital) how these guys came up with such great
prints while working full-time. Somebody (the wife? the kids?) had to
be picking up the slack. It's been said that the law is a jealous
mistress. I think photography is the same way. I understand where
you're coming from. I've been there. The only thing I can suggest is,
capture what you can, save and archive it for the time when you retire
and have the time, altho you'll be faced with the same time issues. I
know.

 
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Arnor Baldvinsson
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      12-30-2006
Hi,

> you're coming from. I've been there. The only thing I can suggest is,
> capture what you can, save and archive it for the time when you retire
> and have the time, altho you'll be faced with the same time issues. I
> know.


I have every intention of making photography my business, long time before I
retire - don't think I ever will retire, don't really know what that is<g>
I'm approaching photography as any other business venture. I feel I have
the creativity to make up for lack of technical knowledge. I don't aim to
be the best of the best, just good enough that I and others can enjoy my
work and I can use it as an additional source of income. I have a lot to
learn, but I bet I can pick up a few things about photography as well new
programming languages and new software techniques<g> So far, everything
sounds logical and makes perfect sense to me.

--
Arnor Baldvinsson
San Antonio, Texas


 
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