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Why Calibrate Your Monitor?

 
 
Christopher Campbell
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      12-19-2006
The thread on the Spyder got me to wondering, why calibrate your monitor at
all? No matter what I do, the picture on the monitor is not going to match
the print. The print, for one thing, is not backlit, which seems to me to be
a major change right there. And if I am just going to show the picture on the
web, I have no control over others' monitors. For all I know, skin tones on
others' monitors come out different shades of green.

And, heck, if you are not doing the printing yourself, you really have no
control at all.

 
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MarkČ
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      12-19-2006
Christopher Campbell wrote:
> The thread on the Spyder got me to wondering, why calibrate your
> monitor at all? No matter what I do, the picture on the monitor is
> not going to match the print. The print, for one thing, is not
> backlit, which seems to me to be a major change right there. And if I
> am just going to show the picture on the web, I have no control over
> others' monitors. For all I know, skin tones on others' monitors come
> out different shades of green.
>
> And, heck, if you are not doing the printing yourself, you really
> have no control at all.


I was likely one of the people in that thread...and my prints match my
monitor exactly.
Color, shadows, highlights, everything.

--
Images (Plus Snaps & Grabs) by MarkČ at:
www.pbase.com/markuson


 
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Roy G
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      12-19-2006
"Christopher Campbell" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) e.com...
> The thread on the Spyder got me to wondering, why calibrate your monitor
> at
> all? No matter what I do, the picture on the monitor is not going to match
> the print. The print, for one thing, is not backlit, which seems to me to
> be
> a major change right there. And if I am just going to show the picture on
> the
> web, I have no control over others' monitors. For all I know, skin tones
> on
> others' monitors come out different shades of green.
>
> And, heck, if you are not doing the printing yourself, you really have no
> control at all.
>

Hi,

There is a very large amount of truth and a certain amount of logic in what
you say.

You will never get a Print to Exactly match the screen, because of the
transmitted light, and also because of the different Gamuts.

BUT if you calibrate it, and your Printer, then you should get the
differences down to a reasonable amount.

If you post images on the Web or send them by Email, at least those people
with Calibrated Monitors will see your images the same way you do.

For those who don't bother calibrating, they will get whatever colours and
density their system happens to show. That will be their loss.

Roy G


 
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Ken Lucke
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      12-19-2006

In article <(E-Mail Removed) m>,
Christopher Campbell <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Christopher Campbell wrote:
> > The thread on the Spyder got me to wondering, why calibrate your
> > monitor at all? No matter what I do, the picture on the monitor is
> > not going to match the print. The print, for one thing, is not
> > backlit, which seems to me to be a major change right there.


If your monitor is calibrated properly, that's irrelevant to the result.

> > And if I
> > am just going to show the picture on the web, I have no control over
> > others' monitors. For all I know, skin tones on others' monitors come
> > out different shades of green.


As for the other peoples's monitors, I don't care particularly if
theirs are not correct - that's their problem, not mine, and one that
has no bearing on my workflow. If they tolerate green skin tones when
it's obvious that they shouldn't be, it's an SEP.

> >
> > And, heck, if you are not doing the printing yourself, you really
> > have no control at all.


Wrong. You dial up the color profile for the printer and paper that
they are going to be using (you DID ask them, right? And request a
copy of their profiles prior to final image adjustment?), and output
the image sent to them appropriately, and it still comes back just like
it was on your monitor. That's all part of a managed-color workflow.

In article <_KXhh.15952$(E-Mail Removed)>, MarkČ < here)@cox..net>
answered:
> I was likely one of the people in that thread...and my prints match my
> monitor exactly.
> Color, shadows, highlights, everything.


Which is exactly the whole point of calibration - so youu can
soft-proof your image onscreen and not waste paper/ink/time/hardware
usage/effort [all==$$] to repetively make a print, tweak it, make a
print, tweak it, etc.

--
You need only reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a
reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating
the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for
independence.
-- Charles A. Beard
 
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Kinon O'Cann
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-20-2006

"Christopher Campbell" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) e.com...
> The thread on the Spyder got me to wondering, why calibrate your monitor
> at
> all? No matter what I do, the picture on the monitor is not going to match
> the print. The print, for one thing, is not backlit, which seems to me to
> be
> a major change right there. And if I am just going to show the picture on
> the
> web, I have no control over others' monitors. For all I know, skin tones
> on
> others' monitors come out different shades of green.
>
> And, heck, if you are not doing the printing yourself, you really have no
> control at all.
>


I calibrate both and the match damned near perfect. Maybe that's why...


 
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Skip
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      12-20-2006
"Christopher Campbell" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) e.com...
> The thread on the Spyder got me to wondering, why calibrate your monitor
> at
> all? No matter what I do, the picture on the monitor is not going to match
> the print. The print, for one thing, is not backlit, which seems to me to
> be
> a major change right there. And if I am just going to show the picture on
> the
> web, I have no control over others' monitors. For all I know, skin tones
> on
> others' monitors come out different shades of green.
>
> And, heck, if you are not doing the printing yourself, you really have no
> control at all.
>

Actually, even if you aren't printing yourself, you still have control. If
your monitor is calibrated, it will match your printer's output. If you
take a print from your own printer to the lab, that lets them know what you
expect. In our case, we have our monitors calibrated with the same (Spyder)
software as the local lab we use the most, so our output matches theirs on a
consistent basis. Even given that, our output matches that of Mpix and
White House Custom Color. If our monitors were not calibrated, then we'd be
engaging in a crapshoot every time we sent a file in for production. This
way, we have some leverage if we were to tell them the color is incorrect.

--
Skip Middleton
www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
www.pbase.com/skipm


 
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Derek Fountain
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      12-20-2006
Christopher Campbell wrote:
> And if I am just going to show the picture on the
> web, I have no control over others' monitors. For all I know, skin tones on
> others' monitors come out different shades of green.


Everyone else has pointed out the flaws in your argument, but the above
quote is correct. If you're just generating images for the web, to be
viewed by the average, uncalibrated monitor, a fully managed workflow
isn't necessary.
 
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David Azose
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      12-20-2006
Christopher Campbell wrote:
> The thread on the Spyder got me to wondering, why calibrate your monitor at
> all? No matter what I do, the picture on the monitor is not going to match
> the print. The print, for one thing, is not backlit, which seems to me to be
> a major change right there. And if I am just going to show the picture on the
> web, I have no control over others' monitors. For all I know, skin tones on
> others' monitors come out different shades of green.
>
> And, heck, if you are not doing the printing yourself, you really have no
> control at all.
>

I think a color managed work flow is only necessary if you will be
having someone other than yourself print (or view?) your images. The
goal here is PREDICTABLE color, especially between 2 or more calibrated
systems. In that case, it certainly helps to have things calibrated to a
known standard.

If you will be printing the images yourself, on your own printer, using
just your own monitor, then "pleasing color" is what you are after. If
it looks right to you, your done, and for that you really don't need to
calibrate anything.

David A.
 
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Ron Hunter
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      12-21-2006
Derek Fountain wrote:
> Christopher Campbell wrote:
>> And if I am just going to show the picture on the web, I have no
>> control over others' monitors. For all I know, skin tones on others'
>> monitors come out different shades of green.

>
> Everyone else has pointed out the flaws in your argument, but the above
> quote is correct. If you're just generating images for the web, to be
> viewed by the average, uncalibrated monitor, a fully managed workflow
> isn't necessary.

I set up monitor very scientifically. I displayed both text, and
images, and set it to display the scene the way I LIKED IT. Job done.
No printed charts, no color matching, just set it for my own personal
preferences. Funny, but when I print, things look just like they did no
the monitor. Same eyes, maybe? Grin.
 
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Mike Russell
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      12-21-2006
"Christopher Campbell" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) e.com...
> The thread on the Spyder got me to wondering, why calibrate your monitor
> at
> all? No matter what I do, the picture on the monitor is not going to match
> the print. The print, for one thing, is not backlit, which seems to me to
> be
> a major change right there. And if I am just going to show the picture on
> the
> web, I have no control over others' monitors. For all I know, skin tones
> on
> others' monitors come out different shades of green.
>
> And, heck, if you are not doing the printing yourself, you really have no
> control at all.


LOL - everything you say has some truth to it. If you find that your
results are satisfactory, there is indeed no need for calibration. That
said, there is some benefit to calibrating with a screen colorimeter such as
the Spyder or the Eye One, but this is not absolutely necessary for good and
even excellent results.

Print and display will never match, in the sense that you might grab your
LCD screen by mistake, thinking it is a piece of paper, however it is
possible to use an LCD image as a good guide for overall brightness, as well
as detailed contrast and color judgments, and have that pay off in terms of
a good looking, predictable print. Once again, calibration devices may not
be necessary at all for this, which is a good think since printer
calibration generally requires an order of magnitude more investment in
equipment than accurate monitor calibration.
--

Mike Russell
www.curvemeister.com/forum/


 
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