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Converging verticals

 
 
Laurie
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      11-29-2006
Does anyone know of software which will correct convergimg verticals in
architectiralphotography?
Laurie, U.K.

 
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Jim
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      11-29-2006

"Laurie" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
> Does anyone know of software which will correct convergimg verticals in
> architectiralphotography?
> Laurie, U.K.
>

Photoshop (since V7 at least).
PSP
PSE

And probably others.

Jim


 
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frederick
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      11-29-2006
Laurie wrote:
> Does anyone know of software which will correct convergimg verticals in
> architectiralphotography?
> Laurie, U.K.
>

Gimp (free) for Windows / *nix.

 
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jeremy
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      11-29-2006

"frederick" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:1164821665.663688@ftpsrv1...
> Laurie wrote:
>> Does anyone know of software which will correct convergimg verticals in
>> architectiralphotography?
>> Laurie, U.K.
>>

> Gimp (free) for Windows / *nix.
>


I use Corel Paint Shop Pro Photo XI and it does an excellent job. And they
made it very easy to use in the latest version.

The software superimposes a square on top of the photo. All you do is to
drag each corner of the square to each of the four corners of the building.
Click execute and the building is straightened out. Very quick, very
accurate.

The software has a feature called the Learning Center, that literally walks
you through numerous editing tasks, including the deformation tool. It also
has some "one-click" fixes, for those times that you want to tweak an image
automatically, rather than spend a lot of time doing individual tweaks.

There is a fully functional 30 day trial version available on the Corel Web
Site for download. If you choose to buy, be sure to order the CD version,
rather than the download version, as the CD version includes two hours of
video tutorials.

One major advantage of PSPXI is that Corel has gone to some lengths to ease
the learning curve, with tutorials, an excellent help section and the
Learning Center. I stopped using PS long ago, because PSP was just so much
easier and intuitive. Just my 2-cents'


 
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Dave Cohen
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      11-29-2006
Laurie wrote:
> Does anyone know of software which will correct convergimg verticals in
> architectiralphotography?
> Laurie, U.K.
>

I think most true Photo Editors which will normally not be of the
freebie variety will do the job.
However, how you do it may vary. I use PhotoPlus (an earlier version of
this may be free or nearly so, www.serif.com) which has a thing called
deform tool that does the trick. I doubt the final result is quite the
same as using a large format plate or film camera with all the swings
and tilts and a bulb release that uses a true ball.
Dave Cohen
 
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bmoag
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      11-30-2006
Whatever program you use remember that simply straightening the lines is not
enough as the image will likely be foreshortened and require additional
correction. If you have used a very wide angle lens it is likely there is
pre-existing barrel distortion which should be corrected as well.. Also
significant parts of the image will be unusable so cropping is always
necessary


 
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jeremy
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      11-30-2006

"bmoag" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:yoqbh.1327$(E-Mail Removed) ...
> Whatever program you use remember that simply straightening the lines is
> not enough as the image will likely be foreshortened and require
> additional correction. If you have used a very wide angle lens it is
> likely there is pre-existing barrel distortion which should be corrected
> as well.. Also significant parts of the image will be unusable so cropping
> is always necessary


On the Schneider web site they make the argument that a good perspective
control lens beats software correction hands down. Schneider just happens
to make an expensive PC lens.

Even with the factors that you raise, I still prefer the software solution.
You are right about cropping--it is important to leave room at the edges of
the frame for the inevitable cropping that must occur when the image is
straightened out.


 
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bugbear
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      11-30-2006
jeremy wrote:
>
> On the Schneider web site they make the argument that a good perspective
> control lens beats software correction hands down. Schneider just happens
> to make an expensive PC lens.


(chuckle)

This may be true.

But it's woefully inapplicable to mr Ordinary
and a compact P&S camera!

Or do Schneider make a PC lens to fit the Canon a510?!?!?

BugBear
 
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jeremy
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      11-30-2006

"bugbear" <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote in message
news:456eb3ba$0$8711$(E-Mail Removed)...
> jeremy wrote:
>>
>> On the Schneider web site they make the argument that a good perspective
>> control lens beats software correction hands down. Schneider just
>> happens to make an expensive PC lens.

>
> (chuckle)
>
> This may be true.
>
> But it's woefully inapplicable to mr Ordinary
> and a compact P&S camera!
>
> Or do Schneider make a PC lens to fit the Canon a510?!?!?
>
> BugBear


I did not know that we were discussing converging verticals on P&S cameras.
The OP just asked what software was available that corrected the problem.

Schneider may have a valid argument about the correction being better done
by the optics rather than corrected post-shoot by software. I doubt that
most P&S users would even know what converging verticals are, much less be
concerned about correcting them.


 
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tomm42
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      11-30-2006


On Nov 30, 5:34 am, bugbear <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:
> jeremy wrote:
>
> > On the Schneider web site they make the argument that a good perspective
> > control lens beats software correction hands down. Schneider just happens
> > to make an expensive PC lens.(chuckle)

>
> This may be true.
>
> But it's woefully inapplicable to mr Ordinary
> and a compact P&S camera!
>
> Or do Schneider make a PC lens to fit the Canon a510?!?!?
>
> BugBear


That said, there is an old tome "use the tool that fits the job".
Correcting perspective in software does degrade the image,
significantly in some cases. My tool of choice for this is Photoshop
CS, I'm not sure if Elements has the same tools. That said, I do prefer
4x5 for architecture, but clients often won't pay for it. Then it is
DSLR off the tripod trying to keep everything linear and as little
correction as possible, I find a little scewed perspective preferable
to soft images.

Tom

 
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