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Does IS whir?

 
 
Bryan Olson
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      11-13-2006
Randy Berbaum wrote:
> Bryan Olson <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> : Hebee Jeebes wrote:
> : > In the case of Pentax K100D and K10D they use magnets.
>
> : O.K.; they use magnets.
> : For what, and what does it have to do with the question here?
>
> A magnet suspended between several springs will sense the movement of the
> camera. The magnet tries to remain in place when the camera moves. If this
> magnet then is moving in a coil of wire (the coil is attached to the
> camera, while the magnet is floating) a small voltage is induced in the
> coil that the camera can use to sense direction and speed of motion.


No, that's wrong. You've described a system to detect translational
acceleration, not angular movement. That is not how it works, and
that would not work.

Magnetic coils move the image sensor to compensate for pitch and
yaw. The question was about detecting the angular motion.


> There
> are other more solid state devices (such as using the Hall effect) but
> this is the easiest to describe and explain.


Easy to explain, but wrong.


--
--Bryan
 
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Stewy
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      11-13-2006
In article <(E-Mail Removed). com>,
"(E-Mail Removed)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> If you put your ear or maybe a stethoscope up to a camera or lens with
> IS can you hear a whir? Is that how they work - little gimbals?
>

Nah, it's the air conditioning for the little blighters who do all the
operations inside. Don't you know computers are a myth? If you look
inside any computer it's not electrical switches, it's little guys and
gals doing the work.
 
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m Ransley
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      11-13-2006
The sony H5 is noisy, a staticky kind of constant noise I hear easily.

 
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Daniel Silevitch
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      11-13-2006
On Mon, 13 Nov 2006 20:38:55 +0900, Stewy <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed). com>,
> "(E-Mail Removed)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> If you put your ear or maybe a stethoscope up to a camera or lens with
>> IS can you hear a whir? Is that how they work - little gimbals?
>>

> Nah, it's the air conditioning for the little blighters who do all the
> operations inside. Don't you know computers are a myth? If you look
> inside any computer it's not electrical switches, it's little guys and
> gals doing the work.


No, that's not right. The whir is the spinning of the hamster wheel that
powers the camera (and all other modern electronic devices).

-dms
 
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acl
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      11-13-2006
Randy Berbaum wrote:
> are other more solid state devices (such as using the Hall effect) but


What you described is a device for measuring linear acceleration. How
could you measure it using the Hall effect?

Or was the idea to use the Hall effect to measure change in a magnetic
field and therefore the motion of the magnets above (ie replace the
springs with something using the H effect)?
 
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acl
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      11-13-2006
Bryan Olson wrote:
>
> No, that's wrong. You've described a system to detect translational
> acceleration, not angular movement. That is not how it works, and
> that would not work.
>


Well, you could have one such detector on the top of the camera and one
on the bottom. Then you'd be able to find the angular acceleration about
one axis. And with two more, another axis.

I don't think this is how it's done, though (but have no clue, maybe it is).
 
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say now
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      11-13-2006
There's an image sensor in the lens ? Try again.

"Bryan Olson" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:<TMX5h.9233$(E-Mail Removed) t>...

....

> > A magnet suspended between several springs will sense the movement


> > of the


> > camera. The magnet tries to remain in place when the camera moves. If
> > this


> > magnet then is moving in a coil of wire (the coil is attached to the


> > camera, while the magnet is floating) a small voltage is induced in the


> > coil that the camera can use to sense direction and speed of motion.


>


> No, that's wrong. You've described a system to detect translational


> acceleration, not angular movement. That is not how it works, and that


> would not work.


>


> Magnetic coils move the image sensor to compensate for pitch and yaw.


> The question was about detecting the angular motion.


>


>


> > There


> > are other more solid state devices (such as using the Hall effect) but


> > this is the easiest to describe and explain.


>


> Easy to explain, but wrong.


>


>


> --


> --Bryan



 
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Bill Funk
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      11-13-2006
On Mon, 13 Nov 2006 12:28:12 GMT, Daniel Silevitch
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Mon, 13 Nov 2006 20:38:55 +0900, Stewy <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> In article <(E-Mail Removed). com>,
>> "(E-Mail Removed)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> If you put your ear or maybe a stethoscope up to a camera or lens with
>>> IS can you hear a whir? Is that how they work - little gimbals?
>>>

>> Nah, it's the air conditioning for the little blighters who do all the
>> operations inside. Don't you know computers are a myth? If you look
>> inside any computer it's not electrical switches, it's little guys and
>> gals doing the work.

>
>No, that's not right. The whir is the spinning of the hamster wheel that
>powers the camera (and all other modern electronic devices).
>
>-dms


You're both wrong.
All electronic devices run on smoke.
If the smoke escapes, the device no longer works.
--
Bill Funk
replace "g" with "a"
 
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=?iso-8859-1?Q?M=E5ns_Rullg=E5rd?=
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      11-13-2006
Bryan Olson <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>> If you put your ear or maybe a stethoscope up to a camera or lens with
>> IS can you hear a whir? Is that how they work - little gimbals?

>
> If you're listening for gyroscopes in a Canon, Nikon, Pentax, or
> Minolta/Sony image-stabilization system, no, you won't hear them.
> The gyro sensors are electronic devices with no moving mechanical
> parts.
>
> Outside the gyro sensors, the systems do move some element, to
> compensate for pitch and yaw. Don't know whether the mounts are
> properly "gimbals".
>
> Do they whir? Having neither an IS lens/body nor a stethoscope
> handy, I can't say for sure. I'd guess not, but I've been
> surprised by noises from various tech gadgets.


My Canon IS lens makes a slight whir. I'm guessing the sound is made
by whatever is moving the glass around, not by the motion sensors.

--
Måns Rullgård
(E-Mail Removed)
 
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lubecki@hotmail.com
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      11-13-2006
say now wrote:
> There's an image sensor in the lens ? Try again.


No, but there is an image sensor in the body. Pentax has image
stabilization in the body, not in the lens (unlike, say, Canon).

-Gniewko

 
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