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Does IS whir?

 
 
ronviers@gmail.com
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      11-13-2006
If you put your ear or maybe a stethoscope up to a camera or lens with
IS can you hear a whir? Is that how they work - little gimbals?

Thanks,
Ron

 
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Cgiorgio
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      11-13-2006
Image stabilizers are using "gyro sensors" to detect angular movement of the
camera. Some of them use rotating parts, others are solid state gyro
sensors, all rely on inertial forces. The sensors output a signal indicating
the movement to a processor which in turn drives some form of motor to move
optical parts or the image sensor in the camera for compensation.

<(E-Mail Removed)> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:(E-Mail Removed) ups.com...
> If you put your ear or maybe a stethoscope up to a camera or lens with
> IS can you hear a whir? Is that how they work - little gimbals?
>
> Thanks,
> Ron
>



 
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ronviers@gmail.com
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      11-13-2006

Cgiorgio wrote:
> Image stabilizers are using "gyro sensors" to detect angular movement of the
> camera. Some of them use rotating parts, others are solid state gyro
> sensors, all rely on inertial forces. The sensors output a signal indicating
> the movement to a processor which in turn drives some form of motor to move
> optical parts or the image sensor in the camera for compensation.
>

Do the ones that rotate sell on the higher-end equipment or the lower
end?

Thanks,
Ron

 
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Hebee Jeebes
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      11-13-2006
In the case of Pentax K100D and K10D they use magnets.

R


"Cgiorgio" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:ej98am$foo$03$(E-Mail Removed)-online.com...
> Image stabilizers are using "gyro sensors" to detect angular movement of
> the camera. Some of them use rotating parts, others are solid state gyro
> sensors, all rely on inertial forces. The sensors output a signal
> indicating the movement to a processor which in turn drives some form of
> motor to move optical parts or the image sensor in the camera for
> compensation.
>
> <(E-Mail Removed)> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
> news:(E-Mail Removed) ups.com...
>> If you put your ear or maybe a stethoscope up to a camera or lens with
>> IS can you hear a whir? Is that how they work - little gimbals?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Ron
>>

>
>



 
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Kevin McMurtrie
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      11-13-2006
In article <(E-Mail Removed). com>,
"(E-Mail Removed)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> If you put your ear or maybe a stethoscope up to a camera or lens with
> IS can you hear a whir? Is that how they work - little gimbals?
>
> Thanks,
> Ron


They don't need to have spinning parts. Gyroscopes are used for
ultra-sensitive motion detection. A lens can use accelerometers.

The Canon 70-300 DO IS lens makes noise but it's probably dithered motor
control to eliminate the need for bulky and inefficient analog power
amplifiers. It resembles the sound that the tracking motors on some CD
player lenses make, but deeper.
 
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Cgiorgio
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      11-13-2006
Solid state gyro - sensors are just later technology, probably cheaper to
make, have possibly a longer lifespan (which does not help when the system
life is limited by other components) and can be built smaller. Power
requirements may also be lower for solid state, but it really has nothing to
do with "high end" or "low end".

<(E-Mail Removed)> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
>
> Cgiorgio wrote:
>> Image stabilizers are using "gyro sensors" to detect angular movement of
>> the
>> camera. Some of them use rotating parts, others are solid state gyro
>> sensors, all rely on inertial forces. The sensors output a signal
>> indicating
>> the movement to a processor which in turn drives some form of motor to
>> move
>> optical parts or the image sensor in the camera for compensation.
>>

> Do the ones that rotate sell on the higher-end equipment or the lower
> end?
>
> Thanks,
> Ron
>



 
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ronviers@gmail.com
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      11-13-2006

Kevin McMurtrie wrote:

> The Canon 70-300 DO IS lens makes noise but it's probably dithered motor
> control to eliminate the need for bulky and inefficient analog power
> amplifiers. It resembles the sound that the tracking motors on some CD
> player lenses make, but deeper.


I shouldn't be disappointed, but for some reason I wanted them to use
gyroscopes.
I am glad they at least make noise.

Thanks for the information,
Ron

 
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Bryan Olson
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      11-13-2006
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> Cgiorgio wrote:
>> Image stabilizers are using "gyro sensors" to detect angular movement of the
>> camera. Some of them use rotating parts, others are solid state gyro
>> sensors, all rely on inertial forces. The sensors output a signal indicating
>> the movement to a processor which in turn drives some form of motor to move
>> optical parts or the image sensor in the camera for compensation.
>>

> Do the ones that rotate sell on the higher-end equipment or the lower
> end?


If mechanically rotating gyro sensors are in use at all, they're on
the very, outlandishly, exotically high end.


--
--Bryan
 
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Bryan Olson
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      11-13-2006
Hebee Jeebes wrote:
> In the case of Pentax K100D and K10D they use magnets.


O.K.; they use magnets.
For what, and what does it have to do with the question here?



--
--Bryan
 
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Randy Berbaum
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      11-13-2006
Bryan Olson <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
: Hebee Jeebes wrote:
: > In the case of Pentax K100D and K10D they use magnets.

: O.K.; they use magnets.
: For what, and what does it have to do with the question here?

A magnet suspended between several springs will sense the movement of the
camera. The magnet tries to remain in place when the camera moves. If this
magnet then is moving in a coil of wire (the coil is attached to the
camera, while the magnet is floating) a small voltage is induced in the
coil that the camera can use to sense direction and speed of motion. There
are other more solid state devices (such as using the Hall effect) but
this is the easiest to describe and explain.

Randy

==========
Randy Berbaum
Champaign, IL

 
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