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one-file HDR

 
 
Stan Beck
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      11-10-2006
If most people knew how the human eye sees, they would wish they had a
camera instead.

The eye sees with hi res &color, only a few degrees directly forward.
Everything else is low res and moves to black & white in the peripheral
areas. What the eye does, is record the hi-res images with every eye
movement, and the brain "pastes" them onto the low-res & B&W image of the
whole of what it sees. Then the brain interpolates the patchwork image, and
presents the "interpolated image" for us to appreciate.

And you thought the camera chip was complicated?

--
You can take good photos with a bad camera, and horrible photos with a good
camera.

Stan Beck > From New Orleans to Brandon MS
To reply, remove 101 from address.
***

>>
>> As I said, the eye has a computer behind it; so, no, the eye didn't
>> see the scene as fake.

>
> While it is tru the eye has an effective dynamic range much
> greater than any camera, and an HDR image can record that range,
> the problem then becomes processing the data to compress that
> range into a smaller dynamic range that any output device is capable
> of showing, whether CRT, LCD, paper, Plasma, etc. It is that
> processing step that can mangle the data to make the image look
> fake.
>
> Roger



 
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POTD.com.au
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      11-10-2006

<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ps.com...
> Rutger wrote:
>> Today i made some one-file HDR images:
>> Took a RAW, processed it for under, normal and overexposure and processed
>> them further for HDR.
>>
>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/zwaardd...440531/detail/

>
> Sorry, but I just don't "get" HDR. Most of those pictures look pretty
> bad to me, especially the one with all the tree branches. I think all
> of them would look much better in a single exposure.
>
> I've seen a few HDR pictures that look good, and where *very subtle*
> use of HDR actually makes sense. But it seems that most fans of HDR go
> completely overboard, and end up with grey, flat, low-contrast
> pictures, with weird grey and white halos everywhere. Not very
> attractive.


Agreed... "subtle" is the key to HDR and most do go way over the top and end
up with results as you described. The most noticible give away is usually
the halos, as these hit you in the face even before you can truly access the
image.

HDR can be useful tool though and one that can be brought into play when and
if needed, so I would recommend it as part of the photographer's kit,
provided that it is used effectively.

Here is a 6 image HDR blend and an single exposure... this was my first go
with Photomatix and was simply to check it out....

http://www.potd.com.au/gallery/album...Sunset_HDR.jpg

http://www.potd.com.au/gallery/album...lcoySunset.jpg

Now I understand that people's image prefs will vary and that's cool, but as
I said, this was a test and it was enough to show me that HDR would be
useful at times.

Cheers

Russell


 
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Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)
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      11-11-2006
Stan Beck wrote:

> If most people knew how the human eye sees, they would wish they had a
> camera instead.
>
> The eye sees with hi res &color, only a few degrees directly forward.
> Everything else is low res and moves to black & white in the peripheral
> areas. What the eye does, is record the hi-res images with every eye
> movement, and the brain "pastes" them onto the low-res & B&W image of the
> whole of what it sees. Then the brain interpolates the patchwork image, and
> presents the "interpolated image" for us to appreciate.
>
> And you thought the camera chip was complicated?
>


Having written a book about how the eye sees, I'll keep my eyes,
and not trade them for any camera sensor.

Notes on the Resolution and Other Details of the Human Eye
http://www.clarkvision.com/imagedeta...esolution.html

Roger



 
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Stan Beck
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      11-11-2006
Absolutely. Anything done to my eyes would be an act of desperation.

And thanks for the link. I'll spend a little time there.

--
You can take good photos with a bad camera, and horrible photos with a good
camera.

Stan Beck > From New Orleans to Brandon MS
To reply, remove 101 from address.
***

"Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
message news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Stan Beck wrote:
>
>> If most people knew how the human eye sees, they would wish they had a
>> camera instead.
>>
>> The eye sees with hi res &color, only a few degrees directly forward.
>> Everything else is low res and moves to black & white in the peripheral
>> areas. What the eye does, is record the hi-res images with every eye
>> movement, and the brain "pastes" them onto the low-res & B&W image of the
>> whole of what it sees. Then the brain interpolates the patchwork image,
>> and presents the "interpolated image" for us to appreciate.
>>
>> And you thought the camera chip was complicated?
>>

>
> Having written a book about how the eye sees, I'll keep my eyes,
> and not trade them for any camera sensor.
>
> Notes on the Resolution and Other Details of the Human Eye
> http://www.clarkvision.com/imagedeta...esolution.html
>
> Roger
>
>
>



 
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